Plant ID forum: Wild shrub ID please

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Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
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McCannon
Aug 22, 2017 1:25 PM CST
This plant grows wild along the creek bank, in pretty much full shade under walnut and other trees. The pics are not the best.

Leaves and seeds or berries.
Thumb of 2017-08-22/McCannon/023681 Thumb of 2017-08-22/McCannon/e6f439
This is a typical plant. Some are 8'+ tall.
Thumb of 2017-08-22/McCannon/563224

The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from that!
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Aug 22, 2017 4:06 PM CST
Any chance that you have "buck brush"?
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Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Aug 22, 2017 5:36 PM CST
Thanks @stone. That's possible.. I've been here for 17 years and the plants were just there. I never payed much attention to them or the flowers. They also bear some semblance to the Tatarian Honeysuckle that was linked to. I was cleaning some underbrush around them and was trying to get an ID to see if it was possible to take cutting or plant seeds to fill in the bare spots. If I don't get a definitive ID I'll pay closer attention to how the berries/seeds progress. And get some better pictures.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from that!
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
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ViburnumValley
Aug 22, 2017 8:07 PM CST
Those are one of the pestiferous Asian Honeysuckle tribe - Lonicera sp. - and not in the least a Symphoricarpos orbiculatus. Buckbrush will never reach 8 feet tall, nor is it keen on growing near excessively wet places.

I'd put this one in the Lonicera maackii crowd, though Lonicera tatarica is fair game too.

You should clear THESE out, and plant more things that belong in riparian zones of Illinois environments. If you aren't familiar with those species - ask. Many here can provide that information, and overwhelming successful examples.
John
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Aug 22, 2017 8:20 PM CST
Thanks for the info John. Our creek is usually near dry, and the bank where these plants grow is probably 6-8 feet above the normal water level. They've been here for years and the root structure helps to support the creek bank, as well as providing a green wall between our property and the property behind us. We have clay soil and during heavy rain the water runs across the yard and over the bank into the creek. I would leery of removing them and replacing with young plantings.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from that!
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Aug 22, 2017 8:23 PM CST
I would agree with you.
Porkpal
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
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ViburnumValley
Aug 22, 2017 8:44 PM CST
I would agree with planting what is native to your area, growing it in, and then exterminating the invaders.

It is nothing short of amazing to me. That creek existed long before anyone lived there, and long before these invasive species were introduced. Plants, animals, insects, and all kinds of other flora and fauna interacted in a dynamic ecosystem - without you, me, or anyone else. If you don't know, or are unsure, of what species will serve the purpose in a higher and better manner - just ask. If you don't know how to work in a dynamic or purportedly unstable environment - again, please ask. Many have come and gone before you, and converted this kind of distorted and unnatural condition to one that performs at a higher and more beneficial level for all the other residents of your part of the world.

Those invasive honeysuckle plants are more of an obstacle to a stable environment than you or I could ever enunciate! Of course, you can make whatever decisions you want on your property - right or wrong. But please don't ever believe that those plants are positive contributors in any way, shape, or form - when you have the means, ability, and knowledge to do otherwise.

If my words are not encouraging or persuasive, look to other sources of information. I work for a municipal parks department in a city with a large institution of higher learning. During my two decades here, I have watched the research performed, and the hands-on volunteer labor execute, the conversion of over 900 acres of riparian parkland and woodlands from a condition of choked-with-honeysuckle near-monoculture to one more like the natural situation prior to this invasive species introduction. The work isn't done, but I'm certain that many non-human residents are thankful for the departure of the pests.
John
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Aug 22, 2017 9:05 PM CST
John, I'm not disputing your suggestion, but at my age it's not practical to take on such a project, which would probably revert back to it's current state anyway. The surrounding property owners aren't going to buy in to such a project for the entire length of this creek, particularly since it's still primarily surrounded by farmland.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from that!
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Aug 22, 2017 9:33 PM CST
We live on a river that floods periodically. Growing on its banks is a forest of some type of malignant mulberry. We don't dare to remove it as it is preventing erosion, however whenever a more desirable tree appears - as they continually do, we clear away the nearby mulberries to allow it to take their place. A slow process and not shared by our neighbors, but more conservative in many ways than getting rid of the current mulberry guardians of our western property line.
Porkpal
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Aug 23, 2017 7:14 AM CST
We have a similar situation here. The creek has continued to widen over many years and occasionally under cuts some of the trees growing along the edges. The bank on our side has a steep drop off in some places, very gradual in others and a variety of trees gown on the sloped areas. It's pretty much undisturbed and we prefer to leave it that way.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from that!

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