Houseplants forum: Fiddleleaf Figs

Views: 270, Replies: 7 » Jump to the end
Los Angeles
Image
krystenr1
Aug 23, 2017 10:03 AM CST
I brought this small fiddleleaf fig home last night. I've heard that they are notoriously tricky to care for so I'm looking for help before I even really get started here.


Thumb of 2017-08-23/krystenr1/9357af
Thumb of 2017-08-23/krystenr1/b43c64

Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
Tropicals Butterflies Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
purpleinopp
Aug 23, 2017 5:02 PM CST
Looks like a nice start. These get HUGE. Help with what, specifically?
👀😁😂 - SMILE! -☺😎☻☮👌✌∞☯🐣🐦🐔🐝🍯🐾
The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
👒🎄👣🏡🍃🍂🌾🌿🍁❦❧ 🍃🍁🍂🌾🌻🌸🌼🌹🌽❀☀🌺
☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.
Name: Lin
Southeast Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
Aug 23, 2017 6:14 PM CST
Fiddle-leaf Fig (Ficus lyrata) do get large!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Aug 23, 2017 6:33 PM CST
Ficus lyratas are actually quite hardy and forgiving of some care lapses that other indoor plants do not endure. The key mistake that people make is not providing enough light. It has to be right in front of a north or east window or a few feet away from a west or south window. Leaf spots will develop if you don't provide enough light.

The other common mistake is not watering properly. When potted correctly, and it appears that yours is, then water it thoroughly as soon as the top half-inch of soil feels almost dry.

In good conditions, Lyratas do grow tall and can become unwieldy. They generally don't branch, so they get ever taller. When it reaches a height that you like, start pinching out new leaf tips as they emerge. This will not only keep it from getting too tall, it will also keep it from leaning and may encourage some side shoots.

Happy fiddling!
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Los Angeles
Image
krystenr1
Aug 23, 2017 9:56 PM CST
WillC said:Ficus lyratas are actually quite hardy and forgiving of some care lapses that other indoor plants do not endure. The key mistake that people make is not providing enough light. It has to be right in front of a north or east window or a few feet away from a west or south window. Leaf spots will develop if you don't provide enough light.

The other common mistake is not watering properly. When potted correctly, and it appears that yours is, then water it thoroughly as soon as the top half-inch of soil feels almost dry.

In good conditions, Lyratas do grow tall and can become unwieldy. They generally don't branch, so they get ever taller. When it reaches a height that you like, start pinching out new leaf tips as they emerge. This will not only keep it from getting too tall, it will also keep it from leaning and may encourage some side shoots.

Happy fiddling!


Thanks, Will! This is great. Here are some more pictures because I'm concerned that it may be leaning a little bit? I'm about to pot it in a terra cotta pot tomorrow instead of the plastic pot it came with. Does it look a little root bound in its current pot? Should I put it in a slightly bigger pot when I repot? Thanks!



Thumb of 2017-08-24/krystenr1/fbbaaa
Thumb of 2017-08-24/krystenr1/03e74b
Thumb of 2017-08-24/krystenr1/7128cf
Thumb of 2017-08-24/krystenr1/b0a83f

Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Aug 24, 2017 2:33 PM CST
It looks appropriately potted to me. The surface root exposure is normal and not a cause for concern. However, it does look like the rootball has shrunk away from the inside of the pot probably because it got too dry at some point.

Tamp the soil down in tight in that space. Then, sit the pot in water for a couple of hours to completely re-saturate the soil. In the future, water as soon as the soil surface feels almost dry or just barely damp. If that happens more than twice per week, then you may want to move it up one pot size.

If potted directly into a terra cotta pot, the pot will tend to draw water out of the rootball. Therefore, for this plant, I suggest keeping it in a plastic pot (this one or a larger one if necessary) and setting that pot inside a larger terra cotta pot to cover up the plastic pot.

The new growth appears to be leaning. I have a hunch that may be because it has been a bit too dry. Locate it so that the lean is away from the primary light source. That should help it straighten up slowly.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Los Angeles
Image
krystenr1
Aug 24, 2017 2:46 PM CST
Awesome advice, thanks Will. Do people ever give these plants stakes to tie to, or is that unheard of? I see it often with my rubber plants when I buy them, curious if that's ever done with these guys.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Aug 24, 2017 7:27 PM CST
Using stakes is mostly a matter of aesthetics. Personally, I don't like the artificial look of a staked plant unless it was grown as "totem" with the vines attached to the totem. But that wouldn't apply to a Lyrata. My preference is to prune a plant back when it gets so tall it cannot support itself. That makes for a shorter, more compact plant. Taller is not always better. Pruning does not harm a plant.

But that is my personal aesthetic choice. If you prefer to have a very tall plant and don't mind using stakes or props, go for it. Some people have elaborate strings running from their plants to pipes and other household fixtures. Horticulturally, it really doesn't matter. Whatever floats your boat!
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Houseplants forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Cedrus atlantica"