Houseplants forum: Dyna Gro Foliage Pro & Dyna Gro Protekt

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Name: seaecho
Phelan, Ca. (Zone 8b)
There is ALWAYS room for one more p
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seaecho
Sep 11, 2017 11:51 PM CST
Anyone use these together at say, 1/2 teaspoon each per gallon? I get house plants from Florida sometimes, and with my very low humidity, someone suggested I try Protekt, which I'd never heard of before. It was mentioned it helps plants to adjust to their new environment, and I wondered if it would be good to help them along with acclimating to my lower humidity.

By the way, I've been using Dyna Gro Foliage Pro for years with good results.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
Sep 14, 2017 10:29 PM CST
They should be fine to use together. You would end up with 9-3-9 plus silicon. I like their Grow formula (7-9-5) for my succulents since it gives good blooms, but I never tried the other one, or the silicon thing either. My dosing is about the same as yours (half tsp in 5 liters). Ideally you could do some kind of controlled experiment comparing the nutrients plus or minus the Protekt, and see if you can tell any difference, before putting it into general use.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Sep 14, 2017 10:32 PM (+)]
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Sep 15, 2017 10:35 AM CST
I use Foliage Pro because it has the right NPK proportions for most indoor foliage plants and because it is complete, containing all micro and trace elements as well as the macros.

I did use the Protekt for a number of years but did not find that it made a significant difference, so I stopped.

The plants I care for are all in very low humidity environments during the winter.

For less than optimal light conditions, I dilute to half the recommended label rate.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: seaecho
Phelan, Ca. (Zone 8b)
There is ALWAYS room for one more p
Image
seaecho
Sep 18, 2017 4:02 PM CST
Thank you for the replies! I've read good reports on Protekt so thought why not give it a whirl? Will, what kind of plants do you have in your low humidity, just out of curiosity?
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Sep 19, 2017 12:35 PM CST
Seaecho - I care for hundreds of plants in a variety of office and residential settings throughout NYC. In winter here, humidity is desert-dry in most indoor heated locations. Because these locations are not of my choosing and often the plant selection is not either, I have been surprised to find how well most tropical species do in these low humidity environments, without humidifiers or pebble trays or misting.

The few commonly used species that do NOT do well in low humidity are those that are usually grown in terrariums. Most of those are fragile ferns and few other very thin-leaved plants or very exotic species not commonly available.

Just because plants are native to high-humidity environments does not mean they can't adapt to low humidity. Often, it just means making sure they stay properly hydrated through their roots.

Bottom line: Try most any plant in low humidity and you will probably be pleasantly surprised.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: seaecho
Phelan, Ca. (Zone 8b)
There is ALWAYS room for one more p
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seaecho
Sep 21, 2017 2:11 PM CST
Wonderful answer, Will. I do, in fact, grow crotons with no humidity tray and misting only now and then. I wonder why some plants that are so easy for many others, are almost impossible for me. And then again, I have luck with some that other people claim they cannot grow.

You have given me a boost of confidence. I didn't know that just about any plant can adjust to lower humidity. This Scindapsus aureus lost all its mature leaves when I first got it. I thought it was a goner. I read online that it requires high humidity. Well, the new leaves that were emerging must have adjusted well to my humidity, as they are doing fine, and it's been at least 6 months.
Thumb of 2017-09-21/seaecho/2b81d8

Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Sep 21, 2017 2:27 PM CST
Seaecho - I always grimace when I hear someone say that a particular plant is easy or tough to kill. There are certain plants that thrive on neglect, meaning they can withstand drought, and those plants do well for those with a more casual attitude about plant care. However, those plants do not do well for "plant nurturers" who tend to fuss over their plants. Of course, the opposite is also true.

Another very important consideration for success with plants is available light. Plants placed in the right location may indeed be quite hardy but will fail in another location where the light is too much or too little for that species.

Before I ever recommend a plant for someone (something I do a lot), I always carefully evaluate the available light and also the personality (casual or nurturer) of the caregiver.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Kyle
Middle TN (Zone 7a)
Region: Tennessee Plant and/or Seed Trader Cat Lover Dog Lover Roses Ferns
Hostas Foliage Fan Bromeliad Heucheras Native Plants and Wildflowers Birds
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quercusnut
Apr 5, 2018 6:06 PM CST
I read somewhere that Protekt helps fight/repel spider mites and other insect pests because the silica helps make cell walls stronger or thicker. Anyone know know if there is any validity to this? About the only pest problem I have indoors is spider mites on my impatiens and ivies. Misting with plain water knocks them out on the ivies but not so helpful on my impatiens.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Apr 7, 2018 9:00 AM CST
Silica does have some qualities that do help make a sturdier plant, but only if the nutrients in the soil are lacking in some other way. I used Pro-Tekt on many plants for a number of years and observed no benefits.

Keeping plants healthy with proper, sun, water and soil will do more than anything to hold insect pests at bay.

My advice is to save you money.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Kyle
Middle TN (Zone 7a)
Region: Tennessee Plant and/or Seed Trader Cat Lover Dog Lover Roses Ferns
Hostas Foliage Fan Bromeliad Heucheras Native Plants and Wildflowers Birds
Image
quercusnut
Apr 8, 2018 5:20 PM CST
Too late. D'Oh!
Guess I'll do some side-by-side comparisons.

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