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Avatar for sammermpc
Sep 12, 2017 5:45 AM CST
Brooklyn, NY
I planted a number of climbing hydrangeas along the fence in my back yard — and two of them seem to be suffering— why, I am not exactly sure.

I apologize for my ignorance — but I am not sure whether it is an insect issue, a disease issue, or one of light and drainage. Happy to provide additional details and photos, or check additional details if someone can point me in the right direction.

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Sep 12, 2017 6:02 AM CST
Name: Ronnie (Veronica)
Southeastern PA (Zone 6b)
Count your blessings, be grateful
Region: Ukraine Organic Gardener Keeps Goats Zinnias Dog Lover Morning Glories
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Welcome! @sammermpc
It looks like maybe they are getting too much sun. Do you have them planted in some shade?
Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see.
Avatar for sammermpc
Sep 13, 2017 6:43 AM CST
Brooklyn, NY
Thanks! You know — they are planted pretty much in full-sun, along a fence with south-eastern exposure. I have noticed that the hydrangeas along the opposite side of the yard appear to be doing much better!

Could that explain all that damage entirely? Are there steps to confirm that's the issue! Thanks for the welcome and the help!
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Sep 13, 2017 6:51 AM CST
Name: Ronnie (Veronica)
Southeastern PA (Zone 6b)
Count your blessings, be grateful
Region: Ukraine Organic Gardener Keeps Goats Zinnias Dog Lover Morning Glories
Annuals Bee Lover Dragonflies Butterflies Hummingbirder Birds
My opinion would be they are definitely getting too much sun. I would think they only way to confirm it is to watch it and see if it gets better Shrug! if not, try and keep it well watered if you can't move it.
Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see.
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Sep 13, 2017 6:59 AM CST
Name: Archivesgirl
Salisbury, MD (Zone 7b)
Birds Cat Lover Critters Allowed Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Region: Maryland
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I agree They need some shade or full shade. I've never planted one in full sun but I agree with Ronnie.

Gayle
Avatar for sammermpc
Sep 13, 2017 3:27 PM CST
Brooklyn, NY
Ok, thank you. That makes sense. Perhaps I will try and move them.

Do you have any recommendations for an attractive replacement that would grow to cover the fence? I think I am in zone 6b, and that fence does get a lot of sun.
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Sep 13, 2017 3:39 PM CST
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
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Herbs Region: Florida Vegetable Grower Daylilies Birds Cat Lover
Hi and welcome. If those climbing hydrangeas have been there for a while, why not plant a tree that will shade them instead of moving them? Many nurseries make big discounts on their shade trees in the fall, and it's a great time to plant a tree.

Honeysuckle is a lovely flowering vine that loves full sun if you do move the hydrangeas. It also smells wonderful and attracts hummingbirds. It will need some string or netting to climb on, but once it's up to the top of the fence, it will ramble along there and be beautiful for a long time.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
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Sep 13, 2017 4:38 PM CST
Name: Ronnie (Veronica)
Southeastern PA (Zone 6b)
Count your blessings, be grateful
Region: Ukraine Organic Gardener Keeps Goats Zinnias Dog Lover Morning Glories
Annuals Bee Lover Dragonflies Butterflies Hummingbirder Birds
Another for sun and smells heavenly is Sweet Sweet Autumn Clematis (Clematis terniflora) Clematis Sweet Autumn Clematis (Clematis terniflora)

Trumpet vine is nice but can get invasive https://garden.org/plants/sear...

Morning glories are nice but are annuals.

Passion flower Maypop (Passiflora incarnata)

There are some hardy Kiwis https://garden.org/plants/sear...
Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see.
Avatar for sammermpc
Sep 13, 2017 7:47 PM CST
Brooklyn, NY
Thank you for the suggestions!

I just put in the hydrangeas this spring, so they have not been in the ground for all that long and are still fairly small.

However, I have planted a small flowering dogwood in front of them, that perhaps could offer some shade, though it is quite small it would be a number of years before it gets up to size (it, for what it's worth, is doing quite well).
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Sep 14, 2017 12:32 PM CST
Name: Deb
Planet Earth (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level
If you do plan to move them, I would do so this fall or next spring - before they really take off on you. I have one plant that is quite old (perhaps 20 years or so) which has taken over the entire side of my barn (as much as I will allow). It didn't do much for the first couple of years, likely establishing roots, then zoom! Here is a recent photo, I keep it trimmed to a quasi-tree shape and prune it down from the roof every couple years. This is the north side of my barn, but it gets lots of sunshine during the summer months when the sun is further north. It is a lovely plant, beautiful blooms, yellow fall color, and host to many bird nests. I've never had any pest or disease problems with it. It does suction to the wood aggressively, so be sure it is where you want to leave it, otherwise you'll end up with lots of scars when you pull it away.
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