Ask a Question forum: Weigela pruning

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Pershore Eorcestershire
AnnieD
Sep 13, 2017 2:06 AM CST
Normally I prune my Weigelas after flowering in late spring early summer. However since the colder spell in August this year they have put on masses of growth and have been flowering again on the new growth in August and still into September. I would like to prune back again as they are too tall and bushy. Should I do it in October/November when the flowering will presumably have stopped or should I do it now to try and re-establish them before the winter. This has never happened before and the same has happened with other late spring flowering shrubs such as kerria.
[Last edited by AnnieD - Sep 13, 2017 2:07 AM (+)]
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Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Sep 13, 2017 9:22 AM CST
Annie - usually pruning encourages new growth and I try to restrain myself from that going into winter since tender new growth wouldn't have time to harden off (at least in my climate). Do you get a winter freeze where you are? If so, I would wait until after things freeze or at least go dormant before pruning.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
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McCannon
Sep 13, 2017 9:50 AM CST
Good information Cindy. I was wondering, since our Weigela got quite leggy over the summer. So just wait and prune it in the early spring sounds like the way to go. I'm assuming that would apply to the Ninebark as well.

BTW, @AnnieD, welcome to NGA.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from them!
[Last edited by McCannon - Sep 13, 2017 9:52 AM (+)]
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Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Sep 13, 2017 10:58 AM CST
Mac - I don't do much fall pruning at all as much as it pains me to look at overly tall shrubs over winter. You could prune in the depths of winter if your hands are itching to get out the pruners. I don't prune hydrangeas either in the fall except for removing the flower heads so that snow doesn't accumulate on them and bend over the branches. BUT - I do have various hydrangeas that bloom on new wood. I have a new dwarf ninebark that finally made it into the ground and I'm not touching it until spring.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Sep 13, 2017 11:07 AM CST
Cindy, the Weigela is tall and but not particularly bushy. The Ninebark, just the opposite. Maybe I should prune it late in the season, when growth is minimal, so the snow doesn't weigh it down too much. We have hydrangeas and azaleas that need a little work too.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from them!
Pershore Eorcestershire
AnnieD
Sep 13, 2017 11:26 AM CST
Thank you Shadegardner for your advice. I live in the uk and yes we can have some very cold winters down to as low as -17c in a very bad year. I will wait until spring. Smiling
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Sep 13, 2017 1:42 PM CST
Annie - I figured you were in the UK but wasn't sure when winter sets in for you. You're welcom and good luck.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb

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