Ask a Question forum: Question about wood planters ready to plant

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Name: D
London, UK
didacus
Sep 18, 2017 6:32 AM CST
Hi all,

I have recently purchased two wood planters to transfer some of my plants. I never done it before so I have a simple question about it.

The planter is suppose to be ready to plant. It has a double layer of fabric inside but I am unsure if I should add the soil mix direct to it as there are gaps on the bottom of the planter (pictures attached). I live in an apartment and I am afraid that the moist will weak the fabric and all the soil will drop on my neighbours balcony. Should I add something in-between or is it okay add the mix directly.

Thank you in advance.

Thumb of 2017-09-18/didacus/0a25f8
Thumb of 2017-09-18/didacus/ba2441

Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
Image
joannakat
Sep 18, 2017 6:47 AM CST
They are beautiful! Yes, they will leak, as they look like they're built to facilitate drainage which is good for plants. This is a good thing.

The simple solution is to put a tray or something similar underneath. Boot trays are great, you know, the type that are supposed to be put near doorways so you can put your wet boots on them when you come inside.

A small word of warning--I had some planters like these and the fabric degraded over time. It was a lot of work to remove the plants and soil, and to reline them. My eventual solution was to purchase large bags of planter mix, poke lots of drainage holes in one side of the bag and then place the whole bag into the planter with the holes on the bottom. Then, I cut open the top of the bags and planted my plants directly into the mix. It worked like a charm and held for many years.

Good luck!
AKA Joey.
Name: D
London, UK
didacus
Sep 18, 2017 7:01 AM CST
Good tip. I will follow your recommendation!

Thank you.
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
Image
joannakat
Sep 18, 2017 7:34 AM CST
Welcome!
AKA Joey.
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
Image
Philipwonel
Sep 18, 2017 11:29 AM CST
Mister D : Howdy from California 😁
Hears my ideal ol chap.
First. I would RIP out that netting. Then, paint inside, with some old paint, or cheep paint. It will keep wood from rotting.
Then. Buy a piece of fiberglass window screen to put in bottom. It will keep soil in, let water out. And !!! Won't rot Hurray! Like plastic bag will.
Have a cheeri-hoe day ! Ol Chap I tip my hat to you.
Yee Haa ! 🏇 !
😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Sep 19, 2017 1:27 PM CST
Here is another idea.

Leave the planters as they are with the fabric liner, but put a liner of a heavy gauge clear polyvinyl (plastic) on the bottom and up the sides so it is watertight. Then, keep the plants you are using in their plastic nursery pots and have them sit in saucers inside the box. Cover the top with a top dressing of Spanish moss to disguise the plastic pots.

This will prevent any leakage and allow you to water each plant individually and also replace them individually, if necessary. The Spanish moss is light enough that it is easy to pull aside to see inside the box and make sure you are watering properly. It also means you don't have to disturb the roots of the plants you are using.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
Image
Philipwonel
Sep 19, 2017 1:48 PM CST
Gee ! Will ! It sounds like your setting him up, to dround his plants.
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Sep 19, 2017 2:12 PM CST
Philip - Not at all. Each plant is maintained in its grow pot and watered as needed. Excess water collects in that plant's saucer. With the Spanish moss, it is easy to see to the bottom to make sure excess water is not accumulating. This is just a variation on double potting an individual plant in a single planter.

Let me know if I have been unclear about this setup.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
Image
Philipwonel
Sep 19, 2017 3:00 PM CST
Ok Will. I understand now.
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
Image
joannakat
Sep 19, 2017 7:26 PM CST
WillC said:Philip - Not at all. Each plant is maintained in its grow pot and watered as needed. Excess water collects in that plant's saucer. With the Spanish moss, it is easy to see to the bottom to make sure excess water is not accumulating. This is just a variation on double potting an individual plant in a single planter.

Let me know if I have been unclear about this setup.


Also easy enough to remove the saucers to remove any excess water! Great idea.
AKA Joey.
Name: D
London, UK
didacus
Sep 20, 2017 1:16 AM CST
Oh, too late now but I appreciate the tips. I will look into these other options on the next batch Smiling Thank you very much.

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