Ask a Question forum: Can I Just Plant Daylily Seeds When They're Done Drying Out?

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Name: Ian McBeth
Lincoln NE (Zone 5b)
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Amaryllis Irises
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SonoveShakespeare
Sep 19, 2017 11:20 AM CST
Next summer I will be x breeding daylilies and I want to know if I could plant them after I dry them out. I heard from others that I put them in the fridge with a little amount water in a small sandwich bag and let the roots develop. But I tried that and it didn't seem to work as I expected. Is there another option for the seeds that does not involve a fridge, or sandwich bags with water. I hope their is, because I have a lot of things to do on my mind next summer. Especially GARDENING! :)
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Sep 19, 2017 11:35 AM CST
Hi Ian,

Daylilies are pretty easy to grow from seed. If you weren't successful, perhaps you did not let the seeds ripen enough before you picked the seedpods from your plants.

Daylilies do need a cold stratification period and dampness does help with that. One way to accomplish this would be to pot your seeds in January or February and leave them in an unheated garage for a month. The seeds won't germinate until spring no matter what you do. I wouldn't recommend putting seeds in a plastic bag with a little water - that sounds like a recipe for mold. If you want to stratify in your refrig., put the seeds in a little bit of damp sphagnum moss in a plastic bag.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
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sooby
Sep 19, 2017 12:04 PM CST
Chilling in the fridge in damp vermiculite or perlite works too. After about a month take them out to germinate at room temperature or outdoors if warm enough. They are not supposed to be left in the fridge until they germinate. They also should not spend an extended period of time submerged in water either in the fridge or out.
Name: Ian McBeth
Lincoln NE (Zone 5b)
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Amaryllis Irises
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SonoveShakespeare
Sep 19, 2017 1:41 PM CST
Thanks, Daisyl. Thank You!
I knew there was another answer out there somewhere. But I didn't know what it was. Oh one more thing. Should I water the seeds too while they are potted in an unheated garage or shed during their germination?
Name: Ian McBeth
Lincoln NE (Zone 5b)
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Amaryllis Irises
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SonoveShakespeare
Sep 19, 2017 1:56 PM CST
I tried germinating stella de oro seeds in the fridge. I added water just a tad so the seeds had time to germinate ( 10 to 12 drops in a mini plastic sandwich bag). But it didn't work. :(

Here's a picture to show you what bag I used compared to the bag you guys might of thought of.
(I used the 2x3 bag)


Thumb of 2017-09-19/SonoveShakespeare/0d8af2

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Sep 19, 2017 2:10 PM CST
Sooby is right, the seeds will not germinate in the cold of the refrig. Its built into the DNA of the seed that growing before winter is over is a bad thing. So when the seed is ripe, it goes into a dormant state that it will remain in until the right conditions occur.

To get the seeds to germinate, you have to try to mimic the conditions that will break the dormancy of the seed. In this case, the right conditions are a cold damp winter, followed by a warm spring.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Sep 19, 2017 2:16 PM CST
The reason for adding water (or better yet putting them in dampened vermiculite or something like that) is because for chilling to break seed dormancy the seeds need to have taken up enough water. If the seeds had been dried down then a few drops is probably not enough to rehydrate them.

The idea of stratification in the fridge is to simulate a winter in the ground, followed afterwards by germination at warmer room temperature (simulating spring). As I said, they are not intended to germinate while still in the fridge, which seems to be a fairly common misconception that you probably read somewhere.

If you do this outdoors instead of in the fridge, the medium you put them in should be as damp as you would normally make it for seed starting, so that they can take up enough water for the cold to have an effect (it needs to be between 32 and 50F for stratification). If you cover the containers they should not need further watering.

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