Plant ID forum: Oak Tree Identification

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North Alabama
Jayturk
Sep 28, 2017 6:17 AM CST
Hey I need help identifying this oak tree. I am collecting acorns and planting from it, but can't figure out what type of oak it is. Thanks for any help!

Update: the acorns are round, not egg shaped and are ~1/2" long. The leaves are very pointed at ends, idk if you can tell in picture. And I don't think it's a southern red oak because it isn't bell shaped at the bottom coming off the stem.

I believe it is a pin oak, scarlet oak, or shumard oak. Possibly another type of red oak, but I can't tell the difference!
Thumb of 2017-09-28/Jayturk/242f7a

[Last edited by Jayturk - Sep 28, 2017 10:24 AM (+)]
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Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Sep 28, 2017 6:27 AM CST
Jayturk said:Hey I need help identifying this oak tree. I am collecting acorns and planting from it, but can't figure out what type of oak it is. Thanks for any help!

I believe it is a pin oak, scarlet oak, or shumard oak. Possibly another type of red oak, but I can't tell the difference!
Thumb of 2017-09-28/Jayturk/242f7a


According to my Peterson Field Guide, it looks like a Southern Red Oak or Bear Oak.

Name: Cheryl
Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Greenhouse Plant Identifier Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Plumerias Ponds
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ShadyGreenThumb
Sep 28, 2017 6:35 AM CST
I agree
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Sep 28, 2017 10:04 AM CST
To be sure which one, compare the acorns from your tree to both Southern Red Oak (Quercus falcata) and Bear Oak (Quercus ilicifolia). Acorns are always an important part of identifying an oak tree. And, if you have more than one variety growing near each other, a hybrid is always a possibility.
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North Alabama
Jayturk
Sep 28, 2017 10:27 AM CST
DaisyI said:To be sure which one, compare the acorns from your tree to both Southern Red Oak (Quercus falcata) and Bear Oak (Quercus ilicifolia). Acorns are always an important part of identifying an oak tree. And, if you have more than one variety growing near each other, a hybrid is always a possibility.


I don't think it's a southern red oak because the leaf isn't bell shaped at the bottom coming off the stem. And bear oaks don't show to live in my region. However, this is a yard tree. I still think it's between pin, scarlet, or shumard. The leaves look so close alike on them. The acorn is round shaped, not egg, and is around 1/2" long.
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
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wildflowers
Sep 28, 2017 2:19 PM CST
Scarlet Oak, Quercus coccinea looks possible. Scarlet Oak (Quercus coccinea)

Oak trees can be hard to ID! I still haven't ID all of the oaks here.
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