Vegetables and Fruit forum: POtaTOES results

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Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Oct 1, 2017 2:32 PM CST
Well I finished digging all my potatoes. I have approx. five bushels between two known types and by guess and by gosh hold overs.
The Chipeta type I got at Menard's on a whim gave fantastic results.
Nearly every hill had two soft-ball sized potatoes, four to six croquet ball sized potatoes and from three to six egg sized potatoes.
Out of the whole two gardens, not enough marbles to make more than two Russian potato type dinners.

Digging down south was actually easier on the whole than I expected but several places was just plain globby.
Having to dig so deep is a pain in the butt, down to sixteen inches but by going that deep is one reason I have so many good sized potatoes.
Next year I imagine I will still have hold overs but it is time to plant more new seed, or new variety of seed.
Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
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Bonehead
Oct 1, 2017 5:03 PM CST
I have always wanted to try planting seed potatoes in the fall, but can never find any other than spuds from the grocery store, which who knows what they might be treated with (likely something to inhibit growth). I don't have hard winters, and always have some volunteer spuds sprouting early in the spring which makes me think fall would be a good time to just plant them and be done with it. I've never looked into mail order, I suppose that might be worth a whirl.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
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Weedwhacker
Oct 5, 2017 12:28 PM CST
Deb, you might be able to buy some in the spring and store them in the fridge until fall -- I did that with onion sets one year.
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Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Deer Ferns Herbs Dragonflies
Spiders! Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Birds Fruit Growers Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Bonehead
Oct 5, 2017 1:06 PM CST
I've also been reading that planting organic spuds will work, and those are readily available to me. Which means I'll need to do some advance planning of where the spuds should go next season. And then remember where I planted them.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Seed Starter Vegetable Grower
Greenhouse Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Enjoys or suffers cold winters Butterflies Birds
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Weedwhacker
Oct 5, 2017 5:33 PM CST
Yes, remembering where things were planted in the fall can be a challenge... that's why I cover my garlic with floating row cover! Hilarious!
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Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Oct 5, 2017 11:06 PM CST
Bonehead said:I've also been reading that planting organic spuds will work, and those are readily available to me. Which means I'll need to do some advance planning of where the spuds should go next season. And then remember where I planted them.

How cold does your ground get?
Do not plant too early or they may come up before you wish.

Even up here in the frozen waste land I get spring time volunteers.
Two years ago I found out I missed most of whole row the year before when they came up in a row.
But here they will not sprout till the frozen ground has warmed, if it does not freeze there you may be surprised how soon they come up.




Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Seed Starter Vegetable Grower
Greenhouse Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Enjoys or suffers cold winters Butterflies Birds
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Weedwhacker
Oct 6, 2017 7:50 AM CST
I always have "missed potatoes" sprouting up in the spring too -- now I'm wondering if it would be worth deliberately planting some in the fall; I never seem to get them planted as early as I should in the spring.
“Think occasionally of the suffering of which you spare yourself the sight." ~ Albert Schweitzer /
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Name: tk
murchison texas (Zone 8a)

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texaskitty111
Oct 8, 2017 1:18 PM CST
I was just ordering fall potatoes from groworganic.com.
Good luck! Let's all post a spring review.
Cauliflower is just a cabbage with a college education (mark twain)

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