Ask a Question forum: I need to identify this bug so I can stop it!!

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Durban, South Africa
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CallyC
Oct 3, 2017 3:33 AM CST
There are these orangey/red and black bugs that are eating my poor butternut squash plant and I can't seem to identify them... If anyone could help me I would really appreciate it! I need to stop them before they kill my plant Sad
Thumb of 2017-10-03/visitor/485d46

Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Oct 3, 2017 6:23 AM CST
Looks to be a sucking bug. A type of stink bug. The adults you pretty much have to kill by hand. Try some NEEM OIL, its systemic.
Pyrethrin is a fast knock down spray, that will kill every bug in your garden, bad and good.
Look for clusters of eggs, clusters of baby nymphs, from base of plant, to top of plant, AND SQUISH THEM.
The battles on !!!
Go get them !!!
Charge 🏇🏇🏇!!!
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Oct 3, 2017 9:36 AM CST
Two-spotted Stink Bug. As Philip pointed out, really hard to get rid of.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Oct 3, 2017 9:46 AM CST
Doesn't look like a two-spotted stink bug, which is a North American pest - the OP is in South Africa.

Two-spotted stink bug:
http://bugguide.net/node/view/...

Is it eating holes in the leaves? If not, what damage is it doing?
[Last edited by sooby - Oct 3, 2017 9:50 AM (+)]
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Name: Sue Taylor
Northumberland, UK
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kniphofia
Oct 3, 2017 9:54 AM CST
Why on earth would you want to kill every bug in "your" garden?! And why spray poisons on an area where you are growing vegetables?! Grumbling

Couldn't you try something less drastic? Covering your plants with fleece or similar?
Durban, South Africa
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CallyC
Oct 3, 2017 11:58 AM CST
Philipwonel said:Looks to be a sucking bug. A type of stink bug. The adults you pretty much have to kill by hand. Try some NEEM OIL, its systemic.
Pyrethrin is a fast knock down spray, that will kill every bug in your garden, bad and good.
Look for clusters of eggs, clusters of baby nymphs, from base of plant, to top of plant, AND SQUISH THEM.
The battles on !!!
Go get them !!!
Charge 🏇🏇🏇!!!


Hi Philip,

Thank you for your response! I flicked the bugs I saw into a jug with soapy warm water and they died. I ended up with five of them. I will check the leaves for eggs tomorrow! I will give the NEEM OIL a try Smiling

I just want to tackle these specific bugs at the moment but thank you for giving me a choice of approaches!

Again, thanks for your help Smiling
Durban, South Africa
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CallyC
Oct 3, 2017 12:01 PM CST
kniphofia said:Why on earth would you want to kill every bug in "your" garden?! And why spray poisons on an area where you are growing vegetables?! Grumbling

Couldn't you try something less drastic? Covering your plants with fleece or similar?


Hi Sue,

Thank you for your message, I appreciate your concern. I'm not going to try and wipe out all the bugs in my garden with chemicals. I try my best to steer clear from pesticides and anything not organic. Right now I am getting rid of these bugs by hand.

Smiling
Durban, South Africa
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CallyC
Oct 3, 2017 12:22 PM CST
sooby said:Doesn't look like a two-spotted stink bug, which is a North American pest - the OP is in South Africa.

Is it eating holes in the leaves? If not, what damage is it doing?


Hi Sue,

Thank you for your help! The bugs seem to be eating holes near the edge of the leaves. Wherever they go, the leaves turn brown and holes appear. They seem to be making quick work of it too, I only spotted them for the first time today and they've already done a fair amount of damage.

I've caught and killed the ones that I saw today and I will do another patrol tomorrow Smiling
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Oct 3, 2017 3:04 PM CST
CallyC said:

Hi Sue,

Thank you for your help! The bugs seem to be eating holes near the edge of the leaves. Wherever they go, the leaves turn brown and holes appear. They seem to be making quick work of it too, I only spotted them for the first time today and they've already done a fair amount of damage.



I was thinking it looked like a beetle rather than a bug, and if it is eating holes in the leaves then that would imply it is indeed a beetle. If it is making puncture wounds that turn brown and then fall out leaving round holes, then it's more likely a bug. I don't know that we'll be able to identify it for you given that you are in South Africa - I did do a bit of searching earlier on South African websites and didn't come up with anything similar. Is there any way you can get a sharper picture of it, such as put one on plain white paper for it's photo op? Have you actually seen them feeding? Just wanting to make sure they're the culprit and not innocent bystanders that are actually beneficial.

Durban, South Africa
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CallyC
Oct 4, 2017 12:55 AM CST
sooby said:

I was thinking it looked like a beetle rather than a bug, and if it is eating holes in the leaves then that would imply it is indeed a beetle. If it is making puncture wounds that turn brown and then fall out leaving round holes, then it's more likely a bug. I don't know that we'll be able to identify it for you given that you are in South Africa - I did do a bit of searching earlier on South African websites and didn't come up with anything similar. Is there any way you can get a sharper picture of it, such as put one on plain white paper for it's photo op? Have you actually seen them feeding? Just wanting to make sure they're the culprit and not innocent bystanders that are actually beneficial.



Hi Sue,

I have seen them causing the damage and they are definitely the culprit. I will get a better picture when I catch another one!

Thank you Smiling
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Oct 4, 2017 7:04 AM CST
Howdy : Cally 😁
Your Welcome.
Also, a better pic will help. Use a magnified glass to get closer pic.
A drounded one, will hold still for photo op ! Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing
Ta Ta !
😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Oct 4, 2017 2:05 PM CST
CallyC said:There are these orangey/red and black bugs that are eating my poor butternut squash plant and I can't seem to identify them... If anyone could help me I would really appreciate it! I need to stop them before they kill my plant Sad
Thumb of 2017-10-03/visitor/485d46



I keep a wide-mouthed jar of soapy water when I check the garden. I just tap them to fall into the jar. It is surprising how many bad bugs you can get rid of that way. I nearly eliminated the stink bugs and the dead ones sure can't lay eggs...

Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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crawgarden
Oct 4, 2017 2:22 PM CST
Looks a little like http://somethingscrawlinginmyh...
Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
Durban, South Africa
Image
CallyC
Oct 6, 2017 6:06 AM CST
Philipwonel said:Howdy : Cally 😁
Your Welcome.
Also, a better pic will help. Use a magnified glass to get closer pic.
A drounded one, will hold still for photo op ! Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing
Ta Ta !
😎😎😎


Hi Philip,

I have caught a bunch more! They were back at the poor butternut plant again! No eggs, but some were mating. I have no idea where they are coming from! Sorry I don't have a magnifying glass but I hope this picture is a bit better..

Thank you Smiling



Thumb of 2017-10-06/CallyC/97ce3e

Durban, South Africa
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CallyC
Oct 6, 2017 6:21 AM CST
sooby said:

I was thinking it looked like a beetle rather than a bug, and if it is eating holes in the leaves then that would imply it is indeed a beetle. If it is making puncture wounds that turn brown and then fall out leaving round holes, then it's more likely a bug. I don't know that we'll be able to identify it for you given that you are in South Africa - I did do a bit of searching earlier on South African websites and didn't come up with anything similar. Is there any way you can get a sharper picture of it, such as put one on plain white paper for it's photo op? Have you actually seen them feeding? Just wanting to make sure they're the culprit and not innocent bystanders that are actually beneficial.



As far as I can tell, they are sucking bugs. The leaves have brown and dying spots on them that fall out into holes. I have caught a few more today while they were feeding on the leaves. Here are a few more photos. Maybe they will help? I appreciate all your help Smiling

Thumb of 2017-10-06/CallyC/22592a


Thumb of 2017-10-06/CallyC/93ebe4


Thumb of 2017-10-06/CallyC/441249

Thanks again!

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