Plant ID forum: Unknown Succulent Propagation..??

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Name: Jasmine
Greenville, NY (Zone 5a)
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Jas84
Oct 4, 2017 5:56 PM CST
Hi- several months ago I became friendly with a lady on another gardening website. She lives in beautiful Cali and has a yard full of awesome succulents, and she was gracious enough to send me some cuttings all the way over here in Ny. One of those cuttings was of this beautiful green succulent. It looks like flowers, but it's not. She did not know the name of this plant, and neither do I. Having no idea how to propagate it (if I even could), I decided to try doing it the way I've done it with quite a few other succulents- which is by pulling a leaf off and lying it on top of potting mix with extra perlite. The two leaves I've tried it with are not doing anything. There's no sign of new life, no hints of emerging roots, nothing. The leaves are not shriveled or anything, they still look quite healthy, despite losing some of their pretty green coloring. So.. now for my questions.. Does anyone know what this is? I'd like to research this specific plant but obviously can't without knowing it's name. And does anyone know how/if it can be propagated? Should I give up on the leaves, or just let them remain as is? Maybe it takes a very long time for them to show signs of new life? (One leaf has been lying on the mix for probably about 2-3 months, at least & the other for about 1-2 months) I'd like to look into purchasing more of them, if I can not make my own babies, but after trying to dig a little to find the name I've come up empty handed. Thank you to anyone who is kind enough to respond
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Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)

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plantladylin
Oct 4, 2017 6:10 PM CST
I'm not all that knowledgeable about succulents but it reminds me of an Echeverias (Echeveria) Hopefully someone will recognize it and be able to give you a more exact ID.
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Name: Jasmine
Greenville, NY (Zone 5a)
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Jas84
Oct 4, 2017 6:14 PM CST
Thank you Lin!! It could be a type of echevaria, but you're right, hopefully someone will know for sure. Thank you!!
Name: Suzanne/Sue
Sebastopol, CA (Zone 9a)
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Calif_Sue
Oct 4, 2017 9:34 PM CST

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Looks like it could be an Aeonium.
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Name: Tofi
Sumatera, Indonesia
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tofitropic
Oct 5, 2017 2:25 AM CST
I see tiny teeth on leaf margin, (but not sure, my screen aren't so clear), If there are. than I'm sure it is aeonium (totally agree with Calif_Sue). that will explain why the leaves did nothing, they wont propagate that way, stem cutting, seed will work usually IME.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Oct 5, 2017 9:10 AM CST
Yes, the marginal hairs suggest Aeonium. They can be propagated from leaves, but the difficulty varies with the plant. In general there are easier ways to try first. The best way to propagate most Aeoniums is to cut terminal rosettes off and root them in soil. This can be done regularly if the plant is already branching (best during fall or winter, toward the start of the growth season). Or it can be used to force branching... if you make the cut close to the end, like within the terminal rosette, the stump often responds by sprouting new heads.

Does that container have holes? Is it indoors? If so, try to provide as much light as possible during the plant's active growth season (fall through spring). Aeoniums are not great house plants without very strong light.

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[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Oct 5, 2017 2:24 PM (+)]
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Oct 5, 2017 9:49 AM CST
Thinking out loud here: I wonder if you could propagate Aeonium from a leaf if you took a piece of the 'heal'?
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Oct 5, 2017 12:58 PM CST
That is definitely the part that needs to be intact for the new rosette to sprout, but I don't see any advantage in separating it from the rest of the leaf... both in terms of recovering from injury and reducing the water reservoir available to the young sprouting rosettes before they have grown proper roots.
Name: Jasmine
Greenville, NY (Zone 5a)
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Jas84
Oct 5, 2017 2:37 PM CST
Great! An Aeonium, huh?! Sounds good to me- thank you so much Sue!! Yes tofit, those are spiky little hair like things on the leaf margins, so I guess Cali_Sue is right! Daisy- stupid question.. but what is the "heel" of the leaf? Is that the part that gets detached from the branch? If so, one of the leaves I tried propagating has it in tact, it's a perfect "u" shape, while the other leaf does not have that shape. But I could be completely wrong in my assumption of the definition. Thank you Baja!! But another stupid question.. what is a terminal rosette? It suggests dead or dying to me, but again, I'm probably way off with my thoughts on this one too. So, in order to propagate this, you suggest cutting off one of the rosettes and trying to root it? You said to do it near the end, does that mean as close to the stem as possible, leaving only a tiny bit of stem, or as close to the rosette as possible, leaving more of the stem attached to the main plant? If I beheaded any of the rosettes, I'd like to try giving the plant as much of a chance as possible to grow a new head in its place, so I'd hate to screw it up! Sorry for my misunderstanding of a few things, I'm still trying to learn all this plant lingo. Thank you all so much for your help, I'm so happy to finally have a name to my unidentified, beautiful succulent!!
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Oct 5, 2017 3:16 PM CST
There is no other kind of rosette than the terminal one, to the extent they're all at the end of stems. So that's just me using words redundantly for no good reason. Smiling What I meant to emphasize was that the part you want for propagation is toward the end of the stems, exactly as you interpreted. There is no benefit for propagation purposes in having a naked stem longer than half an inch or so attached to the rosette. The stem closest to the rosette will be fastest to root, and the part you leave behind will also be more likely to branch.

Compare cut locations 1, 2, and 3 in this crude diagram. Site #3, leaving a lot of stem attached to the rosette, is generally to be avoided. Site #2, with just a bit of stem exposed, is the sweet spot for propagation purposes. Site #1, inside the rosette and leaving intact leaves on the mother plant afterwards, is most likely to promote branching. It also yields a somewhat smaller cutting which may be slower/harder to root and get going, based strictly on its size and the lower water reserves.

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For what it's worth, your plant would probably be comfortable in a container twice the size of the current one. Aeoniums tend to conform to whatever space you give them, and I don't know what your space constraints are. But if your goal is to make more of this plant, a bigger pot (within reasonable limits) will give you more plant and more heads to propagate over time. Just be sure to use fast draining soil and a container with holes at the bottom.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Oct 5, 2017 3:31 PM (+)]
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Name: Jasmine
Greenville, NY (Zone 5a)
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Jas84
Oct 5, 2017 9:58 PM CST
Wow Baja, that is extremely informative, thank you so so much!! I had no idea, about any of that. And if I do cut off one of the rosettes I'm pretty positive I would've left quite a bit more of the stem than what you're showing me is best. I also had no idea that it'll most likely conform to the space it's given, that is extremely helpful. I have it in this old tea tin which I drilled holes into the bottom of, but I definitely want more plant so I guess I'll have to give it more room! It is indoors, so hopefully it survives the impending darker days of dreaded winter, id hate to lose it. This is all so informative, and I seriously can't thank you enough!! Since you seem to know a lot about this plant, may I ask another question? As far as its watering.. should I be letting the potting mix fully dry out between waterings, as I have been doing, or do you think a more even moistness is better? I not only let it dry out, but I give it quite a bit of time to remained dried through before watering it again. It looks pretty healthy, I think, so maybe that's what it likes- but anything I can do to improve its growth, health and happiness I will absolutely do. Thank you again so so much!!
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Oct 6, 2017 9:34 AM CST
You can let the soil go completely dry in between watering if you want, but there is no advantage to leaving the soil dry for any extended period. During its active period of growth (fall through spring) your Aeonium might like water a little more often, so it doesn't get quite so dry for so long, but when in doubt water when dry. The period when discretion is important is during the darkest days of winter when there may not be as much sunlight to hasten the process along.

Ideally, if you keep the plant in a very bright place indoors and the environment is climate controlled, you can water it on a regular interval year round. I water my indoor plants once a week but they do get hours of daily sun year round.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Oct 6, 2017 9:34 AM (+)]
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Name: Jasmine
Greenville, NY (Zone 5a)
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Jas84
Oct 6, 2017 9:49 AM CST
Ok, great. I'm relieved to hear that I don't have to keep it dry for any period of time- even though I was doing that I didn't like to, I only did it because I thought I was supposed to. So I just drenched her after reading your comment. Thank you again so much for all your help!!!

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