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Hertfordshire
Ldnlady
Oct 7, 2017 2:55 AM CST
So my sempervivum (I think that's what it is) has a baby plant. Do I try to pot it on or leave it as it is? No idea what to do with baby plants.
Thumb of 2017-10-07/Ldnlady/7542a7

Name: Bob
The Kau Desert, Hawaii (Zone 12a)
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OrchidBob
Oct 7, 2017 11:54 AM CST
Looks more like an Echeveria agavodies or another variety of Echeveria.
Both families are commonly known as "Hen & Chicks"
Growing your small plant into a specimen plant makes it more beautiful
and easier to take care of. Bigger is stronger.
So leave the baby attached and enjoy the brood.
Hertfordshire
Ldnlady
Oct 8, 2017 12:15 AM CST
OrchidBob said:Looks more like an Echeveria agavodies or another variety of Echeveria.
Both families are commonly known as "Hen & Chicks"
Growing your small plant into a specimen plant makes it more beautiful
and easier to take care of. Bigger is stronger.
So leave the baby attached and enjoy the brood.


Thank you for your reply. Smiling Should I move it to a bigger pot then, to give more space for the main plant and the baby as it grows?

Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Oct 8, 2017 10:18 AM CST
The baby plant can be severed carefully and moved into its own small pot or it can be left as is, as suggested by Bob. It is a matter or personal preference.

No need to repot. Echeverias often look crowded, but they actually do much better that way. Repotting is tricky and you can easily lose the entire plant if not done properly. Best to keep it in that pot indefinitely.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Oct 8, 2017 10:41 AM CST

Moderator

Echeverias do not do much better crowded. Just like any succulent they like a little extra space, not a lot. Use a pot just a bit bigger than the size of the rosette for best results. Repotting is not tricky if you are careful. The primary danger in repotting lies in watering too soon afterwards. If you use fast draining soil and wait a week to water, the danger is minimal. I repot several Echeverias a week and don't ever have problems. The mother plant in the picture could use a pot one size bigger eventually, but no rush at this point. If you do choose to keep the offset attached, maybe consider repotting in spring.

If you want you can carefully cut off the offset with a sharp knife, allow it to heal for a few days in a bright place out of the sun, and plant it in its own small pot (about the size of the rosette, and wider than deep). Aim for a half an inch or maybe a bit less of naked stem on the cutting. Do not bury the rosette. Put it on top of the soil, but poke the little stub of a stem into the soil. After potting it up, water as you would the mother plant, which is to say when the soil is going dry, not sooner. In several weeks after it has rooted, it will be visibly bigger and that's time to consider a new pot.

My Echeverias of this type tend to offset in the spring and I cut and root the offsets when they are about the size of the one in the picture. By now (early fall) those offsets are well rooted and ready for a bigger pot. The bigger ones are twice their original size. The rooting process does take a month or two, so be patient and do not overwater during the period when the cutting has no roots and can't use it.

Also do your best to provide lots of sun indoors during the dark days of winter... ideally hours of sun, like right by your brightest south-facing window. Echeverias are not generally good house plants without hours of daily sun. If you are in a low light situation, it might be best to delay any serious intervention with your plant until the spring when that's less of an issue. For what it's worth, your plant should totally fill an 8 inch (20cm) pot when it's fully grown, and probably need something bigger if it's got babies attached.

The Echeverias Database
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Oct 8, 2017 11:40 AM (+)]
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