Daylilies forum: Looking For Help

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Name: Melissa Hopper
St. Helens, Or (Zone 8a)
Semp addict horse junky dog flunky
Sempervivums Keeps Horses
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MelissaHopper
Oct 9, 2017 4:48 PM CST
Hi All!

I am very new to Daylilies but I think they are beautiful. I have 4 right now that I got in the spring at a local plant sale.

Because of my garden situation, I do most of my gardening in big pots and most of what I do are sempervivum but I am branching out a bit.

So, I have 4 daylilies, each planted in their nice big pot. They all grew and bloomed this year and now the blooms are gone and just the greenery is left.

I need to know what to do to prepare them for winter. Do I cut the greenery back or just leave it? Do I leave them in the pots or take them out? What do I need to watch out for?

All help is greatly appreciated.
Name: Jim Washington
Midland City, Al
Daylilies
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jwash
Oct 9, 2017 5:48 PM CST
Hi Melissa: been doing daylilies in pots many years.They are very hardy even tho I am near the Fl border in Al I have had some cold temps. I have had DL in pots above the ground survive temps down to 16degrees with no losses.If you have temps colder I would say leave in pot dig hole deep enough to put the pot in down to the rim and cover with thick layer of straw or hay this will protect the roots and crown from which new green fans will grow from when it gets warm.that all you need to do.when it gets warm in the spring after frosts lift the pots and new fans will soon emerge.Nothing to watch out for if you do the above.Just make sure you put down plenty of straw based on your forcasted coldest temp.If I can help in future send me a tree mail as I don't do this forum thing a lot.
Name: James
California (Zone 8b)
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JamesT
Oct 9, 2017 10:48 PM CST
Daylilies are pretty hardy, I don't think you'll have problems where you're located.

How big are the pots? Are they clay (glazed/unglazed) or plastic.

Do your daylilies have names?
Name: Melissa Hopper
St. Helens, Or (Zone 8a)
Semp addict horse junky dog flunky
Sempervivums Keeps Horses
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MelissaHopper
Oct 10, 2017 2:46 PM CST
Thank you Jim and James for your helpful suggestions.

Right now one of my daylilies is in a huge pot, probably around 20 to 25 gallons.

The other three are on smaller pots, probably around 4 gallons. I am thinking that bigger pots might be a good idea. The pots are plastic.

Three of my daylilies do have names.

Gentle Ed
Thumb of 2017-10-10/MelissaHopper/b9da76

Memories Remain
Thumb of 2017-10-10/MelissaHopper/e299b6

Fun In The Sun -- I am not sure if this is correct as the pics I have seen on the internet don't look anything like this color.
Thumb of 2017-10-10/MelissaHopper/456029

The 4th one has no name but is a very pretty orange color.

Should I trim back the green leaves for the winter or just let them do their own thing?
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Greenhouse Cactus and Succulents Adeniums Sempervivums
Salvias Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Art Plumerias Seller of Garden Stuff Bookworm
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plantmanager
Oct 10, 2017 3:15 PM CST
I'm glad you asked about this, Melissa. I have one daylily in a pot and it's my first winter with it.
I was planning to leave it out all winter. If we get super cold weather, I can take it in. it's Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Big Time Happy').

Thumb of 2017-10-10/plantmanager/3dcc1f

Handcrafted Coastal Inspired Art SeaMosaics!
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Oct 10, 2017 3:26 PM CST
While the leaves are still green I would leave them alone, they are making food for the plant. Once the leaves start to lose their colour, if they do in your climate, the plants are potentially retrieving nutrients from those leaves. Once they are pretty much died back you can cut them off if you wish. That's from the plant's point of view. Cutting them back before then isn't likely to do them much harm unless they are not well established or, if staying in pots rather than in the ground, are not reliably hardy to a colder zone than yours.

Nice looking horse in your avatar from the rider's view Smiling
Name: Melissa Hopper
St. Helens, Or (Zone 8a)
Semp addict horse junky dog flunky
Sempervivums Keeps Horses
Image
MelissaHopper
Oct 11, 2017 10:26 AM CST
Thanks Sue. So they are kinda like daffodils in that they get goodies from the greens. I will do like I do with my daffodils and just remove the stuff when it gets to looking all brown and nasty.

Mine are pretty well established but I think I will move them into bigger pots before it gets any colder.

Glad you like my avatar. That is me and my boy J.R., riding at Fort Stephens State Park on the Oregon coast. One of my favorite pictures.
Name: Nikki
Yorkshire, UK (Zone 8a)
LA name-Maelstrom
Dog Lover Cat Lover Rabbit Keeper Container Gardener
Scatterbrain
Oct 11, 2017 1:02 PM CST
Melissa, I have kept daylilies in pots in cold, wet Yorkshire (England) for over ten years now and almost all of them have done fine.

The only two that have struggled were both dormants and I think our last few winters just haven't been cold enough for them as they were growing fine but just not flowering well, our last very cold winter was several years ago (-25 degrees celcius) but lately they have been mild but very wet.

Also Rich Howard (ct daylilies who I think is in zone 5 but I might be wrong) grows all his in pots too. Most of mine are in 15" diameter or larger (some are 20" plus).

Hope that helps.
Name: Mike
Hazel Crest, IL (Zone 5b)
There's a place of quiet rest !
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Hazelcrestmikeb
Oct 13, 2017 11:08 PM CST
Karen, I too have Big Time Happy in a large pot. The plant is set to the front right side due to other annuals/tropical that are also planted there during the growing season.
Thumb of 2017-10-14/Hazelcrestmikeb/e4cf52




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Name: Susanne
West Germany (Zone 8a)
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SusannesGarden
Oct 13, 2017 11:34 PM CST
MelissaHopper said:
I need to know what to do to prepare them for winter. Do I cut the greenery back or just leave it? Do I leave them in the pots or take them out? What do I need to watch out for?

Due to lack of space I grow my seedlings in square pots , 1st year 8 cm in diameter, 2nd year 11, 3rd year 25 to 28 cms, depending on plant habits. For the recent years there have been no problems in winter, mainly because our winters have been mild and never were colder than -9°C (15.8 F).

But I remember colder times and the loss of several good varieties, because we had more severe temperatures. The pots were block frozen, when suddenly a few slightly warmer days came. We had rain falling on the frozen pots, melting the surface exactely where leaves and roots meet in the "crown". This is the most sensitive part of the whole plant. The crowns of my potted plants rotted because the water stood on the ice and wouldn't run off.

Therefore, if you have such weather in Oregon, rather keept the pots covered against rain. Daylilies can stand a lot of draught while dormant, a waterproof cover will protect them and not cause any harm. Once the frost is over a tight cover (plastic foil) has to be removed to avoid sweating though. If your pots are portable, just place them in a shelter (or under an umbrella ;-)).




Name: Melissa Hopper
St. Helens, Or (Zone 8a)
Semp addict horse junky dog flunky
Sempervivums Keeps Horses
Image
MelissaHopper
Oct 14, 2017 2:07 PM CST
Thank you for the info Susanne.

I will make sure and protect the crowns so they don't sit in water.

I had that happen last year with some of my sempervivums.

We had a lot of snow and the snow melted before the pot unfroze so the water sat on the top of the pot and the plants. Semps don't like that. I noticed it quickly but not quick enough and did have a couple croak on me.
Name: Susanne
West Germany (Zone 8a)
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SusannesGarden
Oct 15, 2017 2:12 PM CST

I'm not familiar with the winters in Oregon... always thought that the ocean provides a milder climate. "Lots of snow" feels ages ago where I live.

While reading your reply I remembered visiting a nursery where to my surprise all pots were turned on their sides for winter. This way rain can not damage the plants and water can run off quickly.
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Greenhouse Cactus and Succulents Adeniums Sempervivums
Salvias Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Art Plumerias Seller of Garden Stuff Bookworm
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plantmanager
Oct 15, 2017 2:23 PM CST
Do you leave yours outside over the winter, Mike?
Handcrafted Coastal Inspired Art SeaMosaics!
Name: Mike
Hazel Crest, IL (Zone 5b)
There's a place of quiet rest !
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Hazelcrestmikeb
Oct 16, 2017 6:33 AM CST
Karen, I do leave it outside. Too big to move.
robinseeds.com
"Life as short as it is, is amazing isn't it ?" Michael Burton
"Be your best you".
Name: Melissa Hopper
St. Helens, Or (Zone 8a)
Semp addict horse junky dog flunky
Sempervivums Keeps Horses
Image
MelissaHopper
Oct 16, 2017 2:15 PM CST
I got my 3 day lilies moved into bigger pots yesterday and boy am I glad that I did. They were all very root bound and I am sure they are enjoying the extra room. I have them in a spot that is somewhat protected from the weather and will keep a close eye on them through winter.

We had a lot of snow last year for around here so hopefully this year it will be mild. But you never know.

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