Roses forum: Pest-resistant roses

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Name: Carol H. Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Peonies Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Hibiscus Daylilies Xeriscape
Hostas Roses Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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csandt
Oct 10, 2017 12:30 PM CST
Peter Kukielski's book, "Roses without chemicals," provides very helpful numerical ratings for disease resistance, but not for pest resistance. Is there a resource that compare rose cultivars on the basis of pest resistance? Ideally this might include some geographical information since the most troublesome pests probably differ for different geographical regions.

My reason for wanting this information is to populate my gardens with more rose cultivars whose blooms are not deformed and don't have ugly brown edges in June and July. I understand that there is a systemic Bayer product that keeps pests at bay, but I would prefer to find roses that look good all season because pests don't bother them.

So far, Savannah is the only rose in my garden that qualifies. Surely there are others!?!
Carol H. Sandt

“Once you stop learning, you start dying.” – Albert Einstein
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Oct 10, 2017 1:12 PM CST
What pest ?
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Carol H. Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Peonies Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Hibiscus Daylilies Xeriscape
Hostas Roses Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
csandt
Oct 10, 2017 1:27 PM CST
Arthropods such as aphids, thrips, spider mites, and Japanese beetles are the ones I suspect are causing deformed blooms and blooms with brown edges, but there are probably others. Not vertebrate pests.

Carol H. Sandt

“Once you stop learning, you start dying.” – Albert Einstein
[Last edited by csandt - Oct 10, 2017 1:30 PM (+)]
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Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Oct 10, 2017 2:16 PM CST
Carol ...

Aphids and spider mites are easy to handle. Just wash them off with a strong spray of water.

As for others, you'll have to do some more research. I don't know of one single rose that is totally pest resistant to all pests.

Good luck.
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Oct 10, 2017 4:23 PM CST
I think the best you can hope for is a healthy, vigorous rose that will outgrow any damage it incurs.
Porkpal
Name: Jackie
Lake Lanier, GA (Heat Zone 7) (Zone 7b)
☺ I love flowers!! ☺
Daylilies Dahlias Hibiscus Lilies Garden Photography
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GenXNEGeorgia
Oct 10, 2017 5:43 PM CST
Does anyone use a wettable sulfur spray solution on their hybrid tea roses to combat pests and disease? My DFH (dear future husband = fiance) and I recently acquired a couple special cultivars that we need to learn to take care of and we'd like to stay away from the systemic chemicals. (The cultivars are Chrysler Imperial, Doris Day, and a few of the same kind of no ID red hybrid tea roses)

(Also, if there are any complete rose care books that anyone could recommend, we would be very appreciative! I've done a lot of online research but it's not holistic - I'd like something that covers care throughout the year, has info re: pests and disease and explains pruning and fertilizing. Thank You! in advance!)

A garden is a grand teacher. It teaches patience and careful watchfulness; it teaches industry and thrift; above all it teaches entire trust. — Gertrude Jekyll
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses Irises Lilies
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Steve812
Oct 11, 2017 9:41 AM CST
I agree with Lyn and Porkpal. There is no magic bullet. Keeping plants healthy gives them a chance to recover from environmental insults. Sometimes, if we work with nature we can steer clear of complete disaster; but the cost is having something that is always a little short of perfection. It seems to me that if one were interested in preserving just a few rose blossoms against thrips one might dust them with rotenone before they open to the point of showing any color at all. And maybe every other day until they open. Maybe by importing some lady bugs in April or when one sees the first aphid one could minimize aphid damage.

Poisons tend to kill the beneficial insects more thoroughly than they kill the target insects. So they can actually increase the bug population. Or cause a garden to have a serious chemical addiction - ultimately ending in collapse.

This year, after growing roses for six or seven years, I found that my garden was crawling with praying mantis. For about a week in August whenever I worked around a rose, one would climb on my back. Mostly these creatures eat largish bugs, but my hope is that the young animals eat smallish pests like thrips. I also observed a good crop of lady bugs this year. I still had a lot of blossoms damaged by nibbling creatures; but I feel like if I were to preserve a few using some poison dust, I might be able to do it without throwing the garden out of whack. I did have thrips damage through much of the first bloom season, especially on my more fragrant roses. Things began to clear up near the middle of July. I, too, would be happy to find a solution that preserves the environment, including the predators of bad bugs in my garden, while still giving me a lot of perfect roses. And I don't think spraying off 200 rose bushes every day is going to be the solution... Point is, it can take a little while for a garden to respond to care. But the response can be fairly robust and sustainable.

As for fungal infections, I use Actinovate SP. It's a bacterium that attacks fungus. The simple idea that it might have the potential to grow in strength as fungal infection spreads is a compelling idea to me. Also that I can focus most of my spraying on diseased parts of plants rather than spraying all foliage. I have no way of knowing whether it affects other organisms; but I do take some comfort from the idea that it is unlikely to poison plants or animals; and it cannot build up in the environment like poisons do. Sometimes I will use potassium bicarbonate which is also a very benign chemical to just about anything that is no a fungus. (Both are available at Rosemania) I've not tried wettable sulfur, but after reading the MSDS it looks pretty benign to me. I just bought 20 lb of powdered sulfur to acidify my soil. I wonder if I could try it as a fungicide?

I'll report back.

When you dance with nature, try not to step on her toes.
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Oct 11, 2017 11:19 AM CST
Steve ... just to add a note to your post about beneficial insects working to control the bad guys ...

The population of bad guys ... ie., aphids, has to grow large enough to support the beneficial insects that prey on them or the beneficials would starve. So, the gardener does have to tolerate some damage while s/he is waiting for the beneficial insects to show up and get to work.

Aphids don't have lungs, which is why they are easily controlled by washing them off of the plant with a spray of water. You never get them all, but there is much, much less damage to the blooms in the rose garden. If you are growing roses for show, a more aggressive approach is used.
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses Irises Lilies
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Steve812
Oct 11, 2017 1:24 PM CST
I know that spraying with water will physically remove aphids and it must disorient them. Does it really kill aphids? I have, once or twice, hit big aphid infestations with Windex knowing that the various surfactants would cause the water to penetrate their tiny air passages and kill them by instant suffocation. I'm quite sure that this works. I hate to admit it, but I also get a little satisfaction from doing it. (It makes the leaves of an already shiny plant that much shinier; but who polishes their rose plants?)

I understand the issue around having enough bad guys to support a population of good guys. One of the bits of good fortune I have now and have had in the past is that I live close enough to a lot of wild spaces that lend support to good guys. Just this morning I left the garden early because this was the moment in time when those tiny little birds that clean scale and other insects off plants were making their rounds in my garden. They travel in great clouds, clean a tree or shrub in a minute or three and move on. Sometimes my garden is big enough to support its own cast of good guys. Sometimes it isn't.
When you dance with nature, try not to step on her toes.
Name: Jackie
Lake Lanier, GA (Heat Zone 7) (Zone 7b)
☺ I love flowers!! ☺
Daylilies Dahlias Hibiscus Lilies Garden Photography
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GenXNEGeorgia
Oct 11, 2017 8:06 PM CST
Thanks so much for the advice -- I am taking it all in and will incorporate a bit of it all. I know it will be trial and error and being Type A doesn't help but I just have to let it go..... <ohm> Thumbs up
A garden is a grand teacher. It teaches patience and careful watchfulness; it teaches industry and thrift; above all it teaches entire trust. — Gertrude Jekyll
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses Irises Lilies
Image
Steve812
Oct 12, 2017 8:31 AM CST
Good Luck, Jackie.
When you dance with nature, try not to step on her toes.
Name: Angie
East Providence Rhode Island (Zone 6b)
Roses
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RIrose
Oct 21, 2017 3:16 PM CST
While there are roses that are disease resistant, there are none that I know of that are resistant to bugs. Certain companion plants such as alliums and heavily scented herbs may discourage an infestation.
www.therosejournal.wordpress.com
Name: Jackie
Lake Lanier, GA (Heat Zone 7) (Zone 7b)
☺ I love flowers!! ☺
Daylilies Dahlias Hibiscus Lilies Garden Photography
Image
GenXNEGeorgia
Oct 21, 2017 8:42 PM CST
Thank You! Angie. It looks like I need to be extra vigilant with the roses and look for indications of issues so they can be addressed ASAP.

A garden is a grand teacher. It teaches patience and careful watchfulness; it teaches industry and thrift; above all it teaches entire trust. — Gertrude Jekyll

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