Daylilies forum: Day Lilies

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Indiana
Indygirl
Oct 15, 2017 12:33 PM CST
I’m separating and moving daylilies to replant from Indiana to Colorado in the spring. Need to separate now & not moving until spring but I want to take some of the day lilies with me. Can I over winter them in pots of soil in my garage to replant when I arrive in Colorado? Any tips?

Is it better to leave them out , tipped & covered in mulch? Can I cover in pine needles?

Thanks! Indygirl
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
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Seedfork
Oct 18, 2017 7:59 PM CST
Welcome to the forum, sorry to see you have had no replies. I have no experience with cold weather over long periods of time so I am of no help. I do hope someone from your zone will reply soon.
Name: Ginny G
Central Iowa (Zone 5a)
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Legalily
Oct 18, 2017 8:13 PM CST
Welcome! Indy. I'm sorry I don't know the answer. I do know when I moved and put some in a "holding spot" the landscaper told me to dig a trench and bury the pots and mulch over them. @shakespearesgarden Diana do you know?
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[Last edited by Legalily - Oct 19, 2017 6:09 AM (+)]
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Name: Dennis
SW Michigan (Zone 5a)
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Dennis616
Oct 19, 2017 6:05 AM CST
Hi Indygirl!

Since we’re in mid-October it should be fine to dig them up now. However I would not leave them outside in pots all winter. They probably would be OK outside with some protection from winds-- and the trench idea Ginny mentions would certainly work. But if you can’t or don’t want to do the trench idea, extreme conditions outside could kill them in pots and why risk it if you could easily store them in the garage.

Follow standard good potting procedures (Cut any leaves to 4-5”. Make sure there are no soil air pockets near the roots. Give the soil a thorough soaking to help remove air pockets and add more soil if any roots become exposed).

The initial soaking of the potting soil is also important because I think you really should keep the soil in the pots moist. For the rest of the fall, and even throughout the winter, add water occasionally to prevent the soil from completely drying out. Extended periods of time being completely dried out could be a problem-- I’ve had shrubs stored in the garage die from that. However, most daylilies are quite tough and can handle a lot.

Those are my thoughts. Good luck!
Name: Ginny G
Central Iowa (Zone 5a)
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Legalily
Oct 19, 2017 6:08 AM CST
I say listen to Dennis nodding nodding And this told me what I need to know too for future use Dennis. Thumbs up
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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Oct 19, 2017 7:09 AM CST
I would be careful not to water the pots too much, though, assuming they have no or minimal leaves through the winter. Something like 90% of the water plants take up is for transpiration, and no leaves means no transpiration so the potting mix isn't going to dry out nearly as much/quickly as if the plants were in full leaf.
Name: Ken
East S.F. Bay Area (Zone 9a)
Region: California
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CaliFlowers
Oct 19, 2017 5:41 PM CST
I agree with Sue, go easy on the water.

I overwinter dormant "Fat-Plants", tender bulbs and caudiciforms for 5-6 months in the garage, and in the spring there is still dampness from early November rains in the center of the soil mass. This is with a light, open, 80% mineral soil mix.

Roots of dormant daylilies should be fine, as long as there is enough soil moisture to lend some "humidity" to the root zone. After the trauma from digging/dividing, the roots will try to grow a bit, and they'll need more moisture then.

Maybe instead of potting up and then watering, you'd be better off pre-moistening the potting mix and then packing it around the roots firmly. That way you start off with plenty of moisture, but no outright sogginess.

I would try to find the coolest spot in the garage, because if it's much above 37-40°, the plants will start to grow again some time around mid-February.

I've heard of Midwest growers overwintering potted daylilies by grouping them together in a protected spot outdoors, covering with a couple of feet of leaves, then covering with a plastic tarp. Maybe that would work better.

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