Ask a Question forum: Repotting lilies

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7b
Tkhan
Oct 16, 2017 11:25 AM CST
Hi all I planted some asiatic lillies and Day lillies together last year Got a gorgeous display I want to repot and separate them now and I found a lot of baby bulbs
What should I do and will the babies grow if i repot now
Thumb of 2017-10-16/Tkhan/23b786
Thumb of 2017-10-16/Tkhan/439138

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Oct 16, 2017 2:31 PM CST
Can you wait until everything is dormant?
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7b
Tkhan
Oct 16, 2017 3:16 PM CST
It's fall now temps reaching 40s and the foliage has all died Ilet the foliage be until it was all dried up and cut it off few days ago
I planted other fall bulbs
Btw I'm in NYC
Name: Joshua
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Zone 10b)
Köppen Climate Zone Cfb
Region: Australia Bookworm Cat Lover Lilies Orchids Irises
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Australis
Oct 16, 2017 3:19 PM CST

Moderator

If everything has gone dormant (i.e. foliage has died back), then you can safely repot the lilies. The baby bulbs are probably stem bulblets and will send up either small stems or a large single leaf next spring, probably ahead of the large, mature bulbs.
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7b
Tkhan
Oct 16, 2017 3:27 PM CST
😃👍 Thank You!
Name: kathy
Michigan
Zone 4b, near St. Clair MI
Cottage Gardener Lilies Organic Gardener
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katesflowers
Oct 16, 2017 3:45 PM CST
I like it when Joshua shows up to answer a lily question. You'll always get a great dialogue.
"Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing." Shakespeare
7b
Tkhan
Oct 16, 2017 7:44 PM CST
So will the baby bulb become a lily ?
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
Oct 16, 2017 8:25 PM CST
If you leave it in the pot with the daylilies, probably not. They will smother it. If you plant it separately, with time it will be the same as it's mother.
Name: Joshua
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Zone 10b)
Köppen Climate Zone Cfb
Region: Australia Bookworm Cat Lover Lilies Orchids Irises
Seed Starter Annuals Container Gardener Garden Photography Forum moderator
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Australis
Oct 17, 2017 12:41 AM CST

Moderator

I agree with Carol. (Thanks to Kathy for the comment, by the way, but there are certainly members on the forum that are more knowledgeable than me!)

Stem bulblets (baby bulbs that form around the stem at and just below the surface) are one of several ways lilies vegetatively propagate. The number that get produced depends on the cultivar and the conditions. Depending on size, they'll produce either a single large leaf their first year or a short, small stem with half a dozen leaves on it. If conditions are favourable, they can even produce a single flower the year after. Eventually they will mature to be like the parent plant, as Carol said.

If you're new to growing lilies (Liliums), check out the https://garden.org/forums/view... - plenty of knowledgeable people there.

I don't know how much you know, so forgive me if I mention something you already know. When you repot the lilies, try to keep as much of the basal roots (roots from the base of the bulb) as possible so that the bulb doesn't have to use up as much energy growing new ones. Make sure that you plant them so that they have about twice the height of the bulb in soil above them, as well as at least that much beneath them if you're putting them in pots (preferably more). You can compromise on this if you must, but the bulb won't do as well and Lilium bulbs typically pull themselves down to the depth they want anyway over time, courtesy of their contractile roots (there are a few exceptions that can't actually do this).

The essential criterion, though, is that they have excellent drainage. Liliums don't have an outer protective layer like many other bulbs and so don't like staying damp (though there are a few exceptions to this rule too!). They require the most moisture when they are growing until blooming. If you would like to fertilise, a balanced fertiliser can be used when they just start to emerge; if not repotting next year, you can topdress with about an inch of compost in fall/autumn once the stems die back.

Hope that helps and please feel free to ask more questions.
Plant Authorities: Catalogue of Life (Species) --- International Cultivar Registration Authorities (Cultivars) --- RHS Orchid Register --- RHS Lilium Register
My Notes: Orchid Genera HTML PDF Excel --- Lilium Traits HTML PDF --- Lilium Species Crosses HTML PDF Excel --- Lilium Species Diagram
The current profile image is that of Iris 'Volcanic Glow'.
7b
Tkhan
Oct 17, 2017 8:31 AM CST
Thank Joshua for all this great info
I'm going to try and put them in different pot but they are soo tiny
Still I want to see what happens
Should I use a smaller pot ?
And yes I'm absolutely new to gardening as a whole !
Name: Joshua
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Zone 10b)
Köppen Climate Zone Cfb
Region: Australia Bookworm Cat Lover Lilies Orchids Irises
Seed Starter Annuals Container Gardener Garden Photography Forum moderator
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Australis
Oct 17, 2017 10:05 PM CST

Moderator

Stem bulblets can be quite small! They should still survive and grow, though, as long as they don't get overwatered.

You can use a smaller pot for the small bulbs, keeping in mind that you may need to repot them in a year or two as they get bigger. It won't hurt them if the pot is larger than needed, but if it's too small they won't grow as well. Space them out by a few inches as well to give them growing room (generally for mature bulbs the advice is to provide 2-3x the bulb width between bulbs).
Plant Authorities: Catalogue of Life (Species) --- International Cultivar Registration Authorities (Cultivars) --- RHS Orchid Register --- RHS Lilium Register
My Notes: Orchid Genera HTML PDF Excel --- Lilium Traits HTML PDF --- Lilium Species Crosses HTML PDF Excel --- Lilium Species Diagram
The current profile image is that of Iris 'Volcanic Glow'.
Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Oct 18, 2017 4:34 AM CST
Mark the plants with landscaping flags so you you where to dig them up when they are fully dormant. THEN move them Not a day earlier.
Name: Joshua
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Zone 10b)
Köppen Climate Zone Cfb
Region: Australia Bookworm Cat Lover Lilies Orchids Irises
Seed Starter Annuals Container Gardener Garden Photography Forum moderator
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Australis
Oct 18, 2017 4:36 AM CST

Moderator

@Yardenman, did you actually read any of the thread? They're in a pot, not in a garden bed, so it's not difficult to locate them. Tkhan also stated that the foliage had died back and that they had already removed it (in their second post).
Plant Authorities: Catalogue of Life (Species) --- International Cultivar Registration Authorities (Cultivars) --- RHS Orchid Register --- RHS Lilium Register
My Notes: Orchid Genera HTML PDF Excel --- Lilium Traits HTML PDF --- Lilium Species Crosses HTML PDF Excel --- Lilium Species Diagram
The current profile image is that of Iris 'Volcanic Glow'.

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