All Things Gardening forum: Persimmon Tree--- When to plant in Louisiana (9A)??

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Jbroussard17
Oct 20, 2017 9:36 PM CST
Greetings everyone! I tip my hat to you.

I am planning to purchase 2 persimmon trees for my yard here in Lafayette Louisiana. I look all over the internet for information on planting a persimmon tree, but did not really find anything on "tips for planting persimmon trees." Sad

When would be the best/safest time to plan a persimmon tree in Lafayette, Louisiana (Zone 9A)???
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Fruit Growers Permaculture Hybridizer Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener Daylilies
Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Photography Herbs Region: United States of America Seller of Garden Stuff
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ediblelandscapingsc
Oct 20, 2017 10:44 PM CST
persimmons are one of those plants that seem to do better when planted in leaf instead of while dormant. This can be accomplished by buying potted plants now or in spring. Planting dormant bareroot trees are fine but sometimes they can be delayed in leafing out or my not leaf out at all. If you do buy a bareroot tree remove some of the top growth to help overcome this problem.
Will you be growing the Asian or American persimmons? Astringent, Non Astringent. or pollination-constant non astringent types? what rootstock will you be using?
The american persimmon is hardy and productive but all are astringent until fully ripe (mushy).
The american persimmon used as a rootstock has a deep tap root good for heavy soils and is compatible with with all American persimmon types, I've never heard of people grafting american types on any other rootstocks. They can be used as a rootstock for the Asian types but leads to problems on some cultivars like Fuyu later in life.
D lotus is a compatible rootstock with the more fussy Asian cultivars like giant Fuyu. It has a shallow root system but is less hardy than than the american type but that wouldn't be an issue for you.D lotus is good for sandy soils but doesn't do as well as the american persimmon rootstock in wet areas.
The Asian persimmon is the most popular type to grow throughout the world. Some varieties can be eaten while still hard making it possible to market these fruits for fresh consumption because of the longer shelf life. Where as the american persimmon must be gathered once mushy so frozen pulp is the most common market for them. All the Asian types are compatible with D lotus and the American persimmon rootstocks with only few incompatibilities. They do not do well on Asian persimmon rootstocks that's why the other 2 are the most common offered in the US. Knowing the rootstock you'll have is important so you'll know how to amend the soil.
I started with 1 tree a few years ago and now grow over 20 varieties and have about 40 something trees all together and counting. lol my "edible landscape" is turning into a food forest with daylily meadows.
🌿A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered🌿
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Oct 21, 2017 8:05 AM CST
Jb17. Welcome ! 😎
Plant them like any other tree.
You want to save some moolah? nodding Get bare-root. I have no problems with them. In fact, when bare-root start to push green in early spring, many stores and nurseries, will pop them in 5 gallon pots. And mark them up 2 or 3 times. Nice profit, Aye !!!

😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.

Jbroussard17
Oct 21, 2017 8:09 AM CST
Thank you very much for taking the time to respond to my post. You seem to know an awful lot about persimmons Thumbs up

My grandfather had a fuyu persimmon tree, so I was raised on the little small satsuma-size fruit. However, they had a lot of seeds. Recently, I have been buying the larger size (Japanese persimmon?) without seeds. I love making bread with them, so I often freeze 2 cups of fresh fruit at a time.

Here in Louisiana it is very hot (as you probably know). After my grandfather died, I had to move and miss our persimmon tree Sad Sad

I want to plan 2 trees in my backyard, but
(1) the soil is extremely dry and hard
(2) When do I plant? Now? Or wait until Spring?

Thanks for any help!
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Fruit Growers Permaculture Hybridizer Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener Daylilies
Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Photography Herbs Region: United States of America Seller of Garden Stuff
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ediblelandscapingsc
Oct 21, 2017 9:35 AM CST
Philip you live in California where D.lotus is the rootstock 99.9% of the time and since they have a more fibrous root system they respond well to transplanting. Bareroot plants on D. virginiana usually have some type of damage to the taproot and makes it easier to transplant when pot grown. D. virginiana is used as a rootstock East of the Mississippi more often than D.lotus.
@Jbroussard17 I think you sill be fine with either rootstock in your area though D. virginiana may do better. You can plant now or spring but be sure to amend the soil very well to break up that hard soil. Here are a few Japanese persimmons that you may want to look into. They all are non astringent and can be eaten hard or soft.
Izu - medium size Sweet fruits ripen in late September-mid October and the tree only gets 10ft tall
Tam Kam - large sweet fruit ripens in late Oct-November, and only gets about 15ft tall
Hana fuyu - large, very sweet fruits ripen in Mid October trees get about 10tall
Imoto Fuyu- Large dark orange fruits have a mild melon flavor, ripen in Late Oct-Mid Nov, and the trees only get 12 ft tall.
🌿A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered🌿

Jbroussard17
Oct 22, 2017 11:15 AM CST
Ediblelandscaping,


Thank you for the information. Thank You! I will definitely look into the tress that you recommended, specifically the smaller trees. I appreciate the suggestion about amending the soil, considering how tightly packed it is. Crossing Fingers! I live in a subdivision that use to be a soybean/corn field so the soil is very hard. I may have to invest in some gardening soil from Lowes/Home Depot. Acorn

I'm going to research the Hana Fuyu and Imoto Fuyu to see if I can purchase those in my area.

In case I cannot, what Amerian persimmon trees do you recommend? The smaller the better....
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Fruit Growers Permaculture Hybridizer Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener Daylilies
Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Photography Herbs Region: United States of America Seller of Garden Stuff
Image
ediblelandscapingsc
Oct 25, 2017 9:58 PM CST
Sorry for the late reply. The American persimmion have to be pruned to be kept smaller. They all tend to grow to about 20-30 feet or more if left alone. Early Golden, Meader, Early Jewel, Dolly wood, and Celebrity are all good American varieties but need a male tree for best crops. Meader is the only reliably self fertile American variety though others have been known to make a few male flowers here and there. Buying local can sometimes be an issue as far as selection. Persimmons are one of those fruits that aren't really popular in the US so purchasing online may be a better option especially if you are looking for something specific.
Stay away from Lowes of home depot when buying fruit trees. Often they are mislabeled, this has been a huge issue for many of my fruit growing friends. Buying the soil from either one is fine but be sure to pick up some mulch while your there. Trust me on the mulch it works wonders.
These are all trusted companies I've bought from in the past and they have a good selection of both American and Asian persimmons.
http://www.nuttrees.net/
https://www.justfruitsandexoti...
http://www.raintreenursery.com...
http://www.burntridgenursery.c...
🌿A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered🌿

Pheard
Dec 22, 2017 10:25 AM CST
I live in Gueydan and planted 2 Fuju persimmon trees that I found at a small nursery in Abbeville six years ago. They were about 5' y'all and without leaves. They finally fruited and I was bringing 26 persimmons to maturity on the tree when someone came and helped themselves to all of them. Here's what I learned about planting them. Pay a visit to All Seasons Nursery in Lafayette. He sells high quality planting material in sacks that you want to use in amending your soil. Dr. Earth is really good but the brand with the happy frog is far better. Expensive? Yes. Worth it? Very. Like I was told. Dig a $1 hole, put in a $2 plant and amend with $22 a bag soil. Everything I've used this on his grown faster and healthier. I'm also located in soil like yours and highly recommend the products and education you get at All Seasons.

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