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Scientists Seek Public Assistance in Tackling Rose Rosette Disease

By dave
October 20, 2017

The team is pursuing three issues: the virus, the mite and rose plant resistance to the disease, according to Byrne, professor of Rosa and Prunus Breeding and Genetics for Texas A&M AgriLife Research, College Station, and Rose Rosette Disease Project director. And now they are soliciting help from people who like to grow roses as well.

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Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Oct 21, 2017 10:28 AM CST
@MargieNY posted two links, yesterday with more information about RRD on the Rose Forum.

In this link, there is a report that Weeks Roses has found rose rosette disease in their growing fields in Wasco, California.

https://garden.org/thread/view...

This link tells you what to look for when you are checking your plants for symptoms of RRD

https://garden.org/thread/view...

Thank you so much Dave for posting this article ... I tip my hat to you.
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
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frankrichards16
Oct 25, 2017 4:23 PM CST
I have had many of my roses die from RRD here in SE Michigan.

My records show that I have had over 100 roses, now only ~50.

I have stopped buying new roses (mostly).

Several years ago I concluded that researchers were aware of the problem, but it was not a major concern.

I hope Texas A&M comes to the rescue!

Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
RoseBlush1
Oct 25, 2017 8:02 PM CST
Frank ...

There has been a lot of co-ordinated research on RRD over the last several years. The first Summit meeting I read about at the University of Delaware was held in 2013, but there may have been earlier summit meetings.

Researchers from both industry and universities around the country meet every year to work together on finding a solution to eliminating, managing and breeding for resistance.

There are lot of articles in the green industry publications about RRD, so, no the topic has not been ignored. They just haven't found a solution ... yet.
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Oct 25, 2017 9:17 PM CST
Frank, thank you for sharing - I am sorry you lost your roses to RRD.
Dave, thank for posting this article. This will help in educating people and will raise consumer awareness to control this disease. Thank you for getting the word out.
Here are some suggestions to reduce the risk.
Destroy multiflora
Familiarize yourself with the symptoms.
Rogue @ the first signs of affected rose - it's systemic - remove ALL roots. Bag in place and discard.
When pruning, sterilize pruners when switching from one to rose to the next.
When planting, leave enough space between each rose. Perhaps plant a shrub in between each rose.
If considering horticultural oils and/or insecticidal soaps or miticides make sure to apply to the underside of leaves.
Another suggestion I read about stated that just after the 1st Spring flush, trim - mites and their eggs live in the new growth.
Barriers to impede movement of mites:
http://deepsouthdistrict.org/w...
Heavily prune in late winter just prior to the new growth. You'll have a good chance of removing mites where they hide in the leaf axils.
Monitor your garden at least weekly.
Avoid using a leaf blower
Everyone must participate. By taking care of the problem spread can be avoided.


[Last edited by MargieNY - Oct 26, 2017 7:02 AM (+)]
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Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Oct 27, 2017 10:49 AM CST
frankrichards16
Frank can you give us some more details? Were the roses planted close together? Did you spray? Did you notice if there were any roses that were not affected even though they were next to a rose that was infected? Did you try pruning to save some roses or did you discard them immediately? Do you get spider mites or thrips in your garden?
Thanks in advance.
Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
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frankrichards16
Oct 27, 2017 12:53 PM CST
Most of the roses were spread out, some were close.

I did not spray.

I do not recall if any affected roses were next to roses that were not effected. I did notice that some of my Knockout roses were affected while others were not.

I did not notice any spider mites or thrips.

Here is a list of the roses that I have that are alive...

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Rosa 'Angelsie', Rosa 'BAIgirl', Rosa 'Blaze', Rosa 'Carefree Delight', Rosa 'Constance Spry', Rosa 'Golden Wings', Rosa 'HOME RUN', Rosa 'Jacques Cartier', Rosa 'KORjuwko', Rosa 'KORsixkono', Rosa 'Madame Plantier', Rosa 'Marchesa Boccella', Rosa 'Mystic Meidiland', Rosa 'Radcon', Rosa 'Radcor', Rosa 'Radrazz', Rosa 'Radrazz', Rosa 'Radrazz', Rosa 'Radtko’, Rosa 'Radtkopink', Rosa 'Sea Foam', Rosa 'The Fairy', Rosa 'unknown climber' L1, Rosa 'White Shrub', Rosa eglanteria, Rosa Explorer 'Frontenac', Rosa Explorer 'Henry Kelsey', Rosa Explorer 'Lambert Closse', Rosa Explorer 'Northern Encore', Rosa Explorer 'Quadra', Rosa Explorer 'Royal Edward', Rosa Explorer 'Survivor', Rosa Explorer 'William Baffin', Rosa Explorer 'William Baffin', Rosa FLOWER CARPET AMBER, Rosa MEIkrotal 'Scarlet Meidiland', Rosa MEIkrotal 'Scarlet Meidiland', Rosa rugosa, Rosa rugosa, Rosa rugosa 'Cutter', Rosa rugosa 'F. J. Grootendorst', Rosa rugosa 'F. J. Grootendorst', Rosa rugosa 'Frau Dagmar Hartopp', Rosa rugosa 'Polar Sun', Rosa rugosa 'Polareis (Polar Ice)', Rosa rugosa 'Robusta', Rosa rugosa 'Showy Pavement', Rosa rugosa 'Sir Thomas Lipton', Rosa rugosa 'Will Alderman'

Here is a list of the roses that have died...

Polianthes tuberosa 'Pearl', Rosa 'Dainty Bess', Rosa 'Dortmund', Rosa 'Golden Showers'', Rosa 'Madame Isaac Periere', Rosa 'Meidiland Red', Rosa 'Morden's Blush', Rosa 'Morden's Fireglow', Rosa 'Radcor', Rosa 'Radrazz', Rosa 'Radrazz', Rosa 'Radtko’, Rosa 'Radtkopink', Rosa 'Red Shrub', Rosa 'Single Red Climber', Rosa 'Single White/Pink Shrub', Rosa 'Tamora', Rosa 'White Shrub', Rosa floribunda 'Baby Love', Rosa Flower Carpet Pink Supreme, Rosa multiflora, Rosa rugosa, Rosa rugosa 'Fimbriata', Rosa rugosa 'Hansa', Rosa rugosa 'Max Graf', Rosa rugosa 'Pink', Rosa rugosa 'Polareis (Polar Ice)', Rosa rugosa 'Roseraie de I'Hay', Rosa rugosa 'Sarah Van Fleet'


Not sure if this info will help...

Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Oct 27, 2017 2:01 PM CST
The reason I asked about spider mites and thrips is because I read on a Garden Web thread (Thoughts about Japanese beetles, mites and RRD) that spider mites and predaceous thrips are predators of RRV vector mites.

I read it again here - very interesting & informative:
http://files.todaysgardencente...

Frank, thank you for sharing your story - heartbreaking...
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Oct 27, 2017 8:16 PM CST
@Margie ... It's kind of a mute point that spider mites might be a predator to the vector mites. RRD will kill the rose. A spider mite infestation will kill the rose.

Thank you for posting the link to the 2013 Webinar. The information in that link is now outdated. There have been annual meetings focusing on RRD and the Department of Agriculture has funded research for RRD ... Hurray!

Here's a link to an article that gives a bit more current information:

https://www.growertalks.com/Ar...

btw .. there are now a lot of articles available as they continue to seek answers.

Frank, I agree with Margie that it is sad that you lost so many roses.

I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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gemini_sage
Oct 28, 2017 3:35 AM CST
I'm glad to see more research is under way to understand and combat RRD. It has been a significant problem here in central Kentucky. Besides losing over half of my roses soon after moving here 10 years ago, I've seen lots of infected plants in home gardens and commercial plantings here in Winchester, and the University of Kentucky arboretum rose garden in Lexington is now a pathetic grave yard that was at one time a glorious rose display.

Infected multifloras were the "typhoid Marys" here, hiding beneath mature spruce trees and in fence rows nearby. Fortunately I live on a farm, well away from other homes and gardens. This allowed me to eradicate the infected plants close enough to infect my garden, and get a handle on the problem. It has now been at least 4 years since I've seen any new infections.

Infection in my garden seemed rather random, with some remaining clean and healthy while nearby roses were infected. My roses are mostly separated from each other with other plants growing between them. I never sprayed. Some sources say that if infection is caught early, and the plant is only showing symptoms on one cane, that the infected portion can be removed and the plant can be saved. I tried this many times, and typically another cane would become symptomatic within a few weeks. Only once was I successful with this- 'Folksinger' is still alive and well 6 years after removing a single infected cane.

I have read that RRD decreases the plants cold hardiness, and that appears to be the case here. In February 2015 we experienced record low temps of -18*F, with some areas reporting temps as low as -32*F. Most of the infected plants in commercial settings around here were killed or damaged to the point that they had to be removed after that. Since then I've seen only a few infected plants in the area.

"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi
Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Image
frankrichards16
Oct 28, 2017 6:36 AM CST
Here is Rosa Explorer William Baffin in May of 2012.


Thumb of 2017-10-28/frankrichards16/f9dd94

Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
RoseBlush1
Oct 28, 2017 11:06 AM CST
Neal ...

I am so glad you joined the conversation and shared your personal experience, too ... I tip my hat to you.

I think Margie is right in that we need to have more discussion here about how RRD has impacted our gardens.

When you wrote Infected multifloras were the "typhoid Marys" here, hiding beneath mature spruce trees and in fence rows nearby. it kind of shows that we do need to be more vigilant to protect our own plants.

Frank, that photo is just heartbreaking.

I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
gemini_sage
Oct 29, 2017 4:07 AM CST
Lyn, at first I thought it was a hopeless situation and that I would simply have to give up on roses altogether. I can't express what a relief it has been to realize there is indeed hope. However I do sympathize with those who live in neighborhoods where the lack of vigilance and ignorance of others nearby keeps their roses in danger.

Frank, that looks like it was a large rose, it must have been a real booger to dig out! I was so afraid that my Leontine Gervaise would get RRD, because it is so large- I can't imagine having to dig it out!
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi
Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Image
frankrichards16
Oct 29, 2017 6:06 AM CST
did not dig it out. Cut it to the ground and then roundup.
Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
gemini_sage
Oct 29, 2017 10:56 AM CST
Good thinking, probably the route I'd take under similar circumstances.
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi
Name: Carol H. Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Peonies Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Hibiscus Daylilies Xeriscape
Hostas Roses Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
csandt
Oct 29, 2017 12:13 PM CST
Is RRD a concern when purchasing Palatine's roses, which are grafted to Multiflora rootstock?

I ordered several in the Fairy Tale series from Palatine for spring, 2018 delivery, and they don't seem to be available elsewhere.
Carol H. Sandt

“Once you stop learning, you start dying.” – Albert Einstein
Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Oct 29, 2017 12:45 PM CST
[quote="gemini_sage"]Lyn, at first I thought it was a hopeless situation and that I would simply have to give up on roses altogether. I can't express what a relief it has been to realize there is indeed hope. However I do sympathize with those who live in neighborhoods where the lack of vigilance and ignorance of others nearby keeps their roses in danger.

This is exactly the problem I have living next to a vacant lot. The lot is too small to build on but large enough to keep my rose garden in jeopardy. This dense piece of land is occupied by an assortment of huge trees, vines, evergreens, poison ivy a huge amount of invasive multiflora. I won't walk onto this land because the of the rough terrain, type of vegetation and ticks. However, as far as I can see, to date, I have seen no signs of RRD but.....
Ticks are a problem here and I found Sevin helpful - I do not want Lyme disease.
From a Newday article: "New York has the highest number of confirmed Lyme disease cases nationwide, according to the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention". As it turns out, Sevin kills mites so it is serving a duel purpose.
I have thrips in my garden which may be a blessing in disguise. This past summer I used Blue Sticky Traps to catch thrips - it's effectiveness was something I could live with. Predaceous Thrips are predators of RRV vector mites. Perhaps it is better to "control Thrips rather than eradicate them".
O.K. so here is my plan to protect my garden from RRD:
1) continue the Sevin
2) control but don't eliminate the thrips using the Blue Sticky Traps.
3) Plant a barrier between my property and the lot.
4) Continue ordering duplicates of my favorite roses and plant in separate areas.
5) Propagate roses like Ludwig's "The Yellow".
http://hartwoodroses.blogspot....
Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
gemini_sage
Oct 30, 2017 5:20 AM CST
Carol, I consider Palatine very reputable and I don't have worries ordering from them. Multifloras aren't carriers of RRD but are just particularly susceptible to it. And since they are invasive in many parts of the US there are often diseased plants growing in waste areas unobserved and unnoticed. This isn't an issue when they're used as a rootstock because the RRV vector mites feed from leaves, but any rose grafted onto those roots could be at risk if there are diseased plants nearby. Knock Out roses are also particularly susceptible to RRD, those are the most commonly infected plants I see around here. They're used so extensively in commercial plantings and by people who aren't really gardeners, the disease often goes unnoticed.

Margie, very interesting that thrips are predators of the mites. I didn't realize Sevin controlled mites, that's good to know, being that it is readily available and inexpensive. That's a good prevention plan you have I tip my hat to you.
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi
Name: Carol H. Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Peonies Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Hibiscus Daylilies Xeriscape
Hostas Roses Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
csandt
Oct 30, 2017 9:26 AM CST
Thanks, Neal (and Margie for focusing on the problem of RRD).
There are some wild roses in the hedgerows that edge my little farm, but I don't know whether they are multiflora. At least some of them are pink and not fragrant, rather than white and fragrant, like multiflora. I'll need to pay more attention to them next year!
Carol H. Sandt

“Once you stop learning, you start dying.” – Albert Einstein
Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Oct 30, 2017 12:57 PM CST
Neal that was a great explanation that you gave Carol.

I was surprised to read about the usage of Sevin also. I read about it in this article:
http://files.todaysgardencente...
"Q: Is Sevin effective to kill this mite?
Yes. We have tested it and it even kills mites in buds and growing shoots, which other pesticides cannot usually reach.
Apparently, Sevin is somewhat systemic in buds and shoots of multiflora roses."

As I stated previously, I was using it for a different purpose - ticks.




Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Nov 1, 2017 1:38 PM CST
Neal and Frank - how long did you wait after your incident with RRD before you introduced new roses to your garden?

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