Aroids forum: Alocasia Amazonia disease. Is my plant suffering?

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mrpelafio
Nov 4, 2017 6:37 AM CST
Hey people!

I'm new here, so if I am posting this in the wrong place, please do redirect me!

I live in central Germany and bought an Amazonia Elephant's Ear together with some other plants a few months ago, during spring! I was dazzled by the beauty of this plant and wanted to care for it.

For the last couple months, however, I have seen my plant in what seems a weaker and weaker state, so I thought (as I do not have all that much experience in caring for plants -but I am keen to learn!-) I'll buy her some liquid fertilizer and apply it every two weeks, which did help in some way (2 new leaves came out and a flower is starting to sprout as of now), but some of the other leafs are still dying in this strange way and I don't know if it may be some type of parasite of infestation.

Around her and her soil there are a fair few fruit flies at all times (might have to do with her being in the kitchen?), and on her leaves I can see some sort of spider web with tiny white dust (I assume it's dust, it could be something else) particles, which I take off with my hand.

Attached is a picture of one of the biggest leaves

Thumb of 2017-11-04/mrpelafio/4e0255

And this is a dying tiny one.

Thumb of 2017-11-04/mrpelafio/cfa932

I've already taken a couple of her dying eaves out because I could see they would not recover.

What should I do? Thanks everyone for helping me save my plant Sad

Name: Ruud
The Netherlands
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RuuddeBlock
Nov 4, 2017 12:03 PM CST
A bad case of spider mite attack. Treat with plenty of water on the leaves and with Bayer Masaï or similar. The mites can be terribly small, so use a magnifying glass to find them. They are there! With thousands!

Those flies are not fruitflies, although they may look like them. Fruitflies fly on fruit only, never on soil. These small ones fly quite differently compared to fruitflies and are Trauermücke (fungus gnats) ( https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/... ) from the Sciaridae family. They live on fungi on too wet, rotting soil. Keep the plant a little drier and they disappear. They do not much harm on full grown plants, but their larvae may kill seeds/seedlings.

Ruud
[Last edited by RuuddeBlock - Nov 4, 2017 12:09 PM (+)]
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Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

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plantladylin
Nov 4, 2017 1:10 PM CST
I agree with everything Rudd has said. Your Alocasia appears to have a severe infestation of spider mites and I'm not certain but the foliage also appears to possibly have fertilizer burn.

African Mask (Alocasia 'Amazonica')
African Mask (Alocasia 'Polly')
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Nov 16, 2017 3:04 PM CST
I hope I am not too late to help. When a plant has pest problems as yours does (spider mites and fungus gnats), it is usually an indication that the plant is under stress for other reasons, such as improper potting, light or watering.

The mites can be treated by thoroughly wiping down all the leaves (tops and bottoms) with a solution of water and liquid dish soap. Make sure you get them all or they will reproduce and return. As Ruud wrote, allowing the soil to dry as deep into the pot as possible will deprive the gnat larvae of the moisture they require to survive.

The presence of the gnats suggests that you may have repotted your plant using soil that was contaminated. The repotting may also be the cause of other problems, especially if the pot is too large and the roots were unnecessarily disturbed by the repotting.

When properly potted, it is best to water this plant when the top inch of soil is dry or just before it starts to wilt just a bit. It also requires a location close to a moderately sunny window but protected from the direct rays of the sun falling on the leaves.

This is a gorgeous, but fragile plant that is not forgiving of mishandling or watering lapses.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Kyle
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quercusnut
Nov 28, 2017 4:58 AM CST
Is this plant the same as 'Polly'? I have been growing (more like trying to grow) a Polly for 11 years now. It had rarely put out more than a couple of leaves. That is when it hadn't gone dormant. Very sickly plant.
Then I planted in Al's 511 and started using DynaGro Foliage Pro.
Results below:





akyraniraz
Mar 11, 2018 3:40 AM CST
Hi! I need your help please 😞 I am really distraught with my alocasia plant.. i got it 2 mos back and it was doing okay, even grew a new leaf! But right after that i noticed a problem in the other leaves, i am thinking maybe its a fungal infection.. can anybody clarify this please? And if i should just take down the infected ones? (Cos then that will mean only the new leaf remains) 😔😔😔 Pls help..

PS i live in a tropical area and keep my plant at the balcony, with indirect sunlight throughout the day.. watering only when top part is dry which is about once a week Sad so far i haven't used any food/fertilizer

The last photo is the new healthy leaf :)

Thumb of 2018-03-11/akyraniraz/2b1277
Thumb of 2018-03-11/akyraniraz/a1408c
Thumb of 2018-03-11/akyraniraz/87eed3
Thumb of 2018-03-11/akyraniraz/976d4c
Thumb of 2018-03-11/akyraniraz/e89321



[Last edited by akyraniraz - Mar 11, 2018 3:42 AM (+)]
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Mar 12, 2018 12:50 PM CST
The symptoms are not of a fungus or any other disease that will spread. The leaf spots might be caused by too much sun or exposure to cold. More likely they are a result of less than perfect watering.

If your Alocasia is outdoors, keep it in shade at all times - no direct sun at all ever! Water it thoroughly (until water runs through the drain hole) when the top half-inch of soil feels dry. Use filtered or distilled water if your tap water is hard. Don't fertilize it. Avoid temps below 60 degrees F.

You can trim off brown leaf tips and edges, but no need to remove an entire leaf unless it is mostly discolored.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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