Ask a Question forum: Question about plants in pots during winter

Views: 193, Replies: 8 » Jump to the end
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
joannakat
Nov 7, 2017 1:46 PM CST
I tried posting this before but it's not showing up. Hope this won't be a duplicate!

I have two plants that I recently dug up and potted. One is a Major Wheeler Lonicera, the other is a Clematis Josephine. They're both young (only one winter in my garden) and in 2 or 3 gallon pots. I don't know how I should care for them during the winter.

I'm in North-central Massachusetts (zone 5b) where it can drop down to -10F during the peak winter months but it usually hovers around zero. And it snows, sometimes bigtime. I'm concerned that the roots of these plants might be damaged during the coldest weather. I should mention that I have no place to bury the pots.

Will these babies be okay outside? Or should I bring them in? Unfortunately, I don't have much light in my home so bringing them in would mean that they get little to no bright light.

Thanks for any advice. No matter how much I learn, I keep running into things I just don't know.
AKA Joey.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Nov 7, 2017 2:18 PM CST
I'm confused. If they already survived one winter in your garden, why did you dig them up and pot them?

Both go dormant in winter so any unheated space will do. Don't take them into your house, that will kill them.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
joannakat
Nov 7, 2017 7:19 PM CST
DaisyI said:I'm confused. If they already survived one winter in your garden, why did you dig them up and pot them?

Both go dormant in winter so any unheated space will do. Don't take them into your house, that will kill them.


Because the spaces are no longer suitable. One wasn't doing well, and the other now belongs to someone else.
AKA Joey.
Name: Trish
North Yorkshire
Region: United Kingdom Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers Bee Lover Cottage Gardener Birds
Dragonflies Bulbs Roses Clematis Greenhouse Hellebores
Image
Yorkshirelass
Nov 8, 2017 1:25 PM CST
Your plants should be ok. They will go dormant as Daisy said.
Make sure you lift your pot off the ground a couple of inches to allow excess water to drain away freely. Also wrap bubble wrap, or similar, around the pots, that will both protect the pot from frost damage and help to insulate the roots of your plants. Place fern or similar leaves, or extra compost over the base of the plants and cover with horticultural fleece as extra protection.
If possible move the pots to a sheltered position to try and avoid the worst of the elements.
Fingers crossed they should survive winter and start showing new growth next Spring - beware of late frosts on new growth though, Mother Nature can be a bit sly at times!
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
joannakat
Nov 8, 2017 2:02 PM CST
Yorkshirelass said:Your plants should be ok. They will go dormant as Daisy said.
Make sure you lift your pot off the ground a couple of inches to allow excess water to drain away freely. Also wrap bubble wrap, or similar, around the pots, that will both protect the pot from frost damage and help to insulate the roots of your plants. Place fern or similar leaves, or extra compost over the base of the plants and cover with horticultural fleece as extra protection.
If possible move the pots to a sheltered position to try and avoid the worst of the elements.
Fingers crossed they should survive winter and start showing new growth next Spring - beware of late frosts on new growth though, Mother Nature can be a bit sly at times!


Thank you so much Trish. Would under a table be considered a sheltered place? I've never heard of horticulture fleece! I was actually considering buying insulation material from a local hardware store, but I've got bubble wrap already so if that works, then....YAAY!
AKA Joey.
Name: Trish
North Yorkshire
Region: United Kingdom Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers Bee Lover Cottage Gardener Birds
Dragonflies Bulbs Roses Clematis Greenhouse Hellebores
Image
Yorkshirelass
Nov 9, 2017 1:28 PM CST
Under a table should be fine, Joanna during the worst of Winter weather.
Horticultural fleece is a fine fabric which is used to protect plants. It lets them 'breathe' I wouldn't put the bubble wrap over the plants, just on the pots. If you can't get hold of any fleece old net curtains will do a similar job.

The more you practice gardening the more enjoyable it becomes.
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
joannakat
Nov 9, 2017 1:31 PM CST
Yorkshirelass said:Under a table should be fine, Joanna during the worst of Winter weather.
Horticultural fleece is a fine fabric which is used to protect plants. It lets them 'breathe' I wouldn't put the bubble wrap over the plants, just on the pots. If you can't get hold of any fleece old net curtains will do a similar job.

The more you practice gardening the more enjoyable it becomes.


thanks Trish, they are both wrapped in bubble wrap, placed on something to raise them up and moved under the patio table up against my house wall.

You're talking about covering the actual plants with the fleece, right? I have some bell covers, would they work too? https://www.gardeners.com/buy/...
AKA Joey.
Name: Trish
North Yorkshire
Region: United Kingdom Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers Bee Lover Cottage Gardener Birds
Dragonflies Bulbs Roses Clematis Greenhouse Hellebores
Image
Yorkshirelass
Nov 10, 2017 9:58 AM CST
Bell covers will be fine. Remember to remove them when the weather gets warmer or they will become too snug and new growth may be long and 'sappy'. Also take the covers off and remove any condensation regularly to avoid any problems.
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
joannakat
Nov 10, 2017 10:00 AM CST
Thank You! !
AKA Joey.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by sunnyvalley and is called "Aster, Bloom and Bud"