Ask a Question forum: WHAT KIND OF plants/FLOWERS CAN I GROW?

Views: 219, Replies: 14 » Jump to the end
warren MI
bobbyboi
Nov 10, 2017 4:32 PM CST

New Member

Hi I am new to the gardening thing i wonder what kind of plants/flowers can i grow? Can i just order any kind of plant to grow? Do i have to look at hardiness zone?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Nov 10, 2017 4:58 PM CST
Welcome!

You will have to find your hardiness zone before you can choose plants. Under 'Tools & Apps', find 'Zone Lookup' and enter your zipcode. That will help determine what plants you can grow.

But you also must consider whether you are planting in the ground or in pots, how much sun/shade your planting area will get. And what kind of soil is in your planting area. Do you have a water source?

Do you want to plant once and have those plants come back year after year? Do you want winter greenery? Summer flowers? Fruit? Vegetables? To attract birds? Do you want lots of flowers but don't mind replanting every spring?

Find your planting Zone and think about the questions I have asked. Then get back to us for some suggestions. If you can take some photos and post of your area, that will help us visualize.

Gardening is fun but the beginning of gardening always seems a little scary. We are here for you.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost
warren MI
bobbyboi
Nov 10, 2017 6:30 PM CST

New Member

DaisyI said: Welcome!

You will have to find your hardiness zone before you can choose plants. Under 'Tools & Apps', find 'Zone Lookup' and enter your zipcode. That will help determine what plants you can grow.

But you also must consider whether you are planting in the ground or in pots, how much sun/shade your planting area will get. And what kind of soil is in your planting area. Do you have a water source?

Do you want to plant once and have those plants come back year after year? Do you want winter greenery? Summer flowers? Fruit? Vegetables? To attract birds? Do you want lots of flowers but don't mind replanting every spring?

Find your planting Zone and think about the questions I have asked. Then get back to us for some suggestions. If you can take some photos and post of your area, that will help us visualize.

Gardening is fun but the beginning of gardening always seems a little scary. We are here for you.


thanks for the reply if i want to grow plants that are not in my zone can i still plant them in pots such a the hoyas flower and ect as houseplants? n yes i got water source i will be plant them in my boring backyard. iam will be working with zone 5b
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Nov 10, 2017 6:36 PM CST
Hoya make great houseplants but not so great garden plants. Smiling Keep the Hoya in the house.

Now you just have to decide the look you are going for in your boring backyard. Is it a big spot or a little spot? Are there already trees planted?

Photos! We love photos.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost
Name: Paula
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
Image
Turbosaurus
Nov 10, 2017 10:01 PM CST
Hello,
ANYONE can grow ANYTHING if you have unlimited time and money- so NO, I'm going to assume you can't grow everything that might strike your fancy. Your zone will be most important consideration. Next is your sun exposure. Southern exposure vs northern, shade, etc.

Many plants that are not suitable for your zone can be grown, you can pull them in and out of the house as weather dictates- but its a lot of work and a very steep learning curve and no where in your house in a MN winter will you get "full sun." It looks like it, but its really only eight hours of very weak winter light. If you don't feel the warmth of the sun outside, your section of the earth is just tilted too far away to matter- yes- it looks like sunlight, but its not enough. I live in NY, 6b. My plants and I hunker down for the winter and I just try to get them to survive- and usually they do - but by March they're looking pretty sad and it is a lot of work. It's also messy. Dead leaves, dirty water, muted colors, stringy stems...

You really want to decide if you will be an indoor or outdoor gardener for each plant. I have plants that I let die each season and those I try and get through the winter. Chose primarily by zone and sun exposure becasue it isn't only about how cold it gets. It's about how long your growing season is or how long it takes for your ground to warm up or how intense the sunlight is.

I will tell you to take the seller's advice with a grain of salt. Don't ride the edge. If you push the boundaries, you are likely to be dissapointed
warren MI
bobbyboi
Nov 11, 2017 9:44 AM CST

New Member

DaisyI said:Hoya make great houseplants but not so great garden plants. Smiling Keep the Hoya in the house.

Now you just have to decide the look you are going for in your boring backyard. Is it a big spot or a little spot? Are there already trees planted?

Photos! We love photos.


this my boring back my yard still need a good cleaning I just got this house from my in-laws like a two month or so still in process of clean the yard and cut down unwanted tree. 5 junk car was parked back here and i just got it move cant wait to turn the house to a beautiful home


Thumb of 2017-11-11/bobbyboi/df6deb

warren MI
bobbyboi
Nov 11, 2017 9:47 AM CST

New Member

Turbosaurus said:Hello,
ANYONE can grow ANYTHING if you have unlimited time and money- so NO, I'm going to assume you can't grow everything that might strike your fancy. Your zone will be most important consideration. Next is your sun exposure. Southern exposure vs northern, shade, etc.

Many plants that are not suitable for your zone can be grown, you can pull them in and out of the house as weather dictates- but its a lot of work and a very steep learning curve and no where in your house in a MN winter will you get "full sun." It looks like it, but its really only eight hours of very weak winter light. If you don't feel the warmth of the sun outside, your section of the earth is just tilted too far away to matter- yes- it looks like sunlight, but its not enough. I live in NY, 6b. My plants and I hunker down for the winter and I just try to get them to survive- and usually they do - but by March they're looking pretty sad and it is a lot of work. It's also messy. Dead leaves, dirty water, muted colors, stringy stems...

You really want to decide if you will be an indoor or outdoor gardener for each plant. I have plants that I let die each season and those I try and get through the winter. Chose primarily by zone and sun exposure becasue it isn't only about how cold it gets. It's about how long your growing season is or how long it takes for your ground to warm up or how intense the sunlight is.

I will tell you to take the seller's advice with a grain of salt. Don't ride the edge. If you push the boundaries, you are likely to be dissapointed



thnaks for the tips annd i will keep that in mind I tip my hat to you.
Greece (Zone 10b)
Foliage Fan Houseplants
Image
Faridat
Nov 12, 2017 1:19 PM CST
All the members have given you great advice, I'm not as experienced, but I only wanted to say, if I were you, after I found out about the Zone, I'd watch the light at different hours of the day, to have a complete light assessment of the garden. I would make a list with the easiest plants for all the light specific places I would like to have plants, and I'd start with these. It would give you experience caring for easier plants first before you step up to some which are not so forgiving, to spare some disappointment. You have a great space, and I wish you success in making it your garden haven!
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Greenhouse Cactus and Succulents Adeniums Sempervivums
Salvias Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Art Plumerias Bookworm Hibiscus
Image
plantmanager
Nov 12, 2017 1:40 PM CST
Congrats on the new house and yard. I can tell it will end up beautiful once you get it cleaned up and planted! Be sure to share photos as it evolves.
Handcrafted Coastal Inspired Art SeaMosaics!
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Georgia Plant Identifier Garden Sages Native Plants and Wildflowers
Critters Allowed Composter Rabbit Keeper Herbs Region: United States of America Dog Lover
Image
greene
Nov 12, 2017 2:54 PM CST
Looking at the zip codes for Warren, MI...it looks like you may be in zone 5b. Plus it looks like you have quite a bit of shade. After you remove the unwanted trees and can assess the available sunny areas, it will help you decide what will thrive in your new yard/garden.

Good luck and happy gardening. Thumbs up
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Paula
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
Image
Turbosaurus
Nov 15, 2017 6:26 PM CST
Faridat made a really good point- watch your yard at various times of day ans see where shadows fall and where you get your most sun.

What are you planning for this yard? what do you like? Are you a flower person or do you like the zen style?

Hosta, (not hoya) grow pretty quick and easy and like shade. They come back every year and although their flowers aren't much to look at, the display you can create with a variety of sizes and shapes and colors from greyish blue to Yellow and lime verigated can really make a beautiful display. DO a web search for hosta gardens and I think you will be impressed.

Hydrangea are another that do well in shade and very little care and come back every year.

These two could provide a nice base in shape and color that you can dress up with annuals. Other perenials that would work in shade and your zone are asitble and bleeding hearts, rhododendron. There's lots of options . Remember when you are dealing with perenials, to note what time of year they bloom. Astible and rhododendron are both late spring, hydrangea are August- you want to plan it out so there is always something new/blooming when you gaze out your windows.

Go find what you like and share it here, we can not only give it a yeah or neigh but might be able to point you toward something similar that will work in your yard.




Name: Deb
(Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Fruit Growers Ferns Dragonflies
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Birds Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
Image
Bonehead
Nov 16, 2017 12:23 PM CST
You could make your space into a lovely native area if you are interested in that look. Ferns would do well under your evergreens, and there are many many varieties to choose from. I would add in some vine maple, which will do well in part shade and bring a pop of color both in spring and fall (they turn color gorgeously and early). Hostas and hydrangeas are good choices as noted above for shade. For a real pop, you might try darmera, which has the common name of umbrella plant or elephant toes - it starts out with a tall pink flowering stalk, then the leaves unfold and they are huge, kind of tropical looking. Bleeding heart, monkshood, lady's mantle, persicaria - all good shade plants with color. I've added some links to the database:

Umbrella Plant (Darmera peltata)
Bleeding Hearts (Dicentra)
Monkshood (Aconitum napellus)
Mountain Fleece (Bistorta amplexicaulis)
Lady's Mantle (Alchemilla mollis)

You could also do a search for shade plants for your zone. Click on 'Plants Database' then 'Search by Characteristics' then check the boxes that might interest you, including your zone so you will only get plants that will thrive for you. What a fun project!
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Hurst, TX (Zone 8a)
luis_pr
Nov 16, 2017 1:15 PM CST
I would go to Spring and Fall plant sales by garden clubs, etc. Most of those originate from local "growers" who have taken cuttings and grown the plants in the 'hood so you know most are bound to be good for your area. Cheap prices too usually. See if your newspaper has a gardening section once a week. They can be advertised in those. Then slowly find places where the clubs communicate online.
Name: George
Fremont, CA (Zone 8b)
Image
PotEmUp
Nov 16, 2017 1:49 PM CST
Bonehead gave a great starter list. Another concern might be - Do you have pets. Many plants are attractive to naive cats & dogs and can be poisonous, so add that to the fairly confusing mix of what to plant. Find a local garden center - Probably not one of the big box stores and take the photo you posted with the amount of shade you have to contend with and they can help you pick out some plants or better yet give you a list so you can keep an eye out for sales.
You have a beautiful blank canvas. I hope you enjoy painting it.
warren MI
bobbyboi
Nov 22, 2017 2:30 PM CST

New Member

Thank u all for reply ill keep all suggests in mind will post up pictures sorry for the rep busy working on the house a yard Thank You!

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by rocklady and is called "Fall is in the Air"