Ask a Question forum: Acclimate water rooted plant

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Greece (Zone 10b)
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Faridat
Nov 12, 2017 12:41 AM CST
I read about the need to slowly acclimate a water rooted plant to soil.
I have no idea how is the procedure. I thought that the moment you see roots in a water
propagated stem, cutting, etc, then you just go ahead and plant it. Any information on
the right procedure, as I currently have quite a few cuttings that are rooting in jars
and don't want to "shock" them when I put them in the soil.
(I have Arrow plant, Dracaena, Tradescantia, and Schefflera put in water to root).
In some Native languages the term for plants translates to "those who take care of us."
Robin Wall Kimmerer
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Nov 12, 2017 9:44 AM CST
There is no proper procedure for getting water grown roots to change their cell structure so they can adapt to soil, only guidelines.

The key is to provide a good potting mix that is able to retain some moisture while having sufficient porosity to allow oxygen around the fragile roots. Then, you have to be very careful about providing just enough moisture, but not too much. The latter is the hard part and usually takes some experience and experimentation to get it right.

I recommend using the smallest pot that the water-rooted cuttings will fit into snugly. Use a damp potting mix that is about two-thirds peat moss and one-third perlite. Try to keep the potting mix damp or slightly moist at all times. Light waterings or heavy mistings tend to work better than thorough waterings.

Another technique is to place the potted cuttings with damp soil inside of a clear plastic tent or bag that is sealed and retains the moisture in the soil and around the foliage. With this technique, you don't have to be concerned with careful monitoring of the potting media moisture as it will stay as you set it up initially.

As the new roots develop, they will become hardier and less sensitive to minor watering lapses. But don't be in a hurry to move the rooted cuttings into a larger pot. The roots should pretty much fill the pot and surround the soil with roots, creating a rootball, before the plant is moved to a pot one size larger.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Greece (Zone 10b)
Houseplants Foliage Fan Cactus and Succulents Tropicals Aroids Bromeliad
Orchids Region: Europe Garden Art Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Cat Lover
Image
Faridat
Nov 12, 2017 10:31 AM CST
Thank you @WillC, very interesting information! Much appreciated! I hope they survive the transition and I will update.
In some Native languages the term for plants translates to "those who take care of us."
Robin Wall Kimmerer

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