Cactus and Tender Succulents forum: Baby Succulents Growing on Trunk

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Name: Sadie
North Carolina
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Sadiet
Nov 12, 2017 1:54 PM CST
About a month ago, I propagated several succulents that had become stretched out. I separated all of the leaves from the bottom of the trunks and "decapitated" the upper portion where the leaves were still close together. The leaves are rooting beautifully and the decapitated sections are successfully rooting in water. One of the plants, which had two branches growing from a single base, is not growing as I expected it to. From reading around on the internet, I was lead to believe that the tunks would form baby plants around their bases which would be separated and replanted after a period of time. This particular plant has baby plants growing from where the leaves were separated. They are very healthy and I can see rapid growth weekly! Each baby plant has tiny roots growing where the baby is connected to the parent. I would really love to keep the babies, as I mentioned, they are extremely healthy and are growing much faster than the babies growing from the leaves. Is it normal for the babies to form in this way? Will they drop off on their own or will I need to separate them? If I have to do it manually, how and when should this be performed? I will include a photo of what it looks like. I haven't found any mention of similar situations on the internet, which is very strange.
Thumb of 2017-11-12/Sadiet/789862

Thank you so much!

Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Nov 14, 2017 11:54 AM CST

Moderator

Yes, it is normal for a lot of succulents to sprout new heads after they have been beheaded. They should be sprouting from buds located near the leaf scars.

That is actually a pretty useful way to propagate them. If you leave the mother plant alone with all those new heads, some or all of them will give rise to new stems and she will live on. You can remove them at any time, but I would recommend waiting until they have a bit of stem first if you're wanting to keep them and grow them on. In any case, no rush, enjoy the process. Smiling

It is sort of magical how some plants come back from injury and decapitation. Nature is very resilient. Thumbs up

Welcome!
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Nov 14, 2017 11:55 AM (+)]
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Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Nov 15, 2017 9:31 AM CST
Hi & welcome! Congrats on your success!

Agree. Your plants' structure is more like a tree than a ground cover. It is not growing babies, they are side branches. Babies have their own roots and are offsets, not branches. Your plant should be a gorgeous clump in a few months if the light remains strong enough to keep it tight.
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Nov 15, 2017 11:43 AM CST

Moderator

Maybe it's just my overactive imagination Smiling , but it looks like all the new heads have also sprouted aerial roots (fine pale sideways hairs). I don't doubt they will grow out as branches regardless, just blurring the line between babies and branches... any new rosette on your plant, whatever the source, can be turned into a new plant by removing it and setting it in soil.

There is some disagreement about what to call branches on Aeoniums, for example (some people still prefer to call them offsets). It's sort of an esoteric discussion given the bottom line. In a sense, all babies coming from the main stem are branches. I normally reserve "offset" for a plant that branches at the base, or new rosettes that appear by way of rhizomes or stolons in the same general area. Roots are after the fact in my mind. But to each her own. Thumbs up
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Nov 15, 2017 11:47 AM (+)]
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Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Nov 15, 2017 1:16 PM CST
TY, that's a much more detailed explanation. Branches does not equal uprightness, just a structural feature. If left on the main stem, the new rosettes form another stem, unlike plants that remain in rosette form when fully mature, like a Sansevieria or Haworthia.



The secondary branch to the left is not in focus, but you can see that it is attached to the primary stem.





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The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
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☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Nov 15, 2017 1:38 PM CST

Moderator

Lovely illustrations. Lovey dubby

Here's one from here. I beheaded this plant earlier this year (spring I believe) and it became quite bushy afterwards. You can see where I severed the main stem and where a few of the branches sprouted.

This is the scene after I removed 2 or 3 heads from the top. It was originally a propagation project but now I'm thinking maybe best to leave well enough alone, and let it grow out. Smiling

Thumb of 2017-11-15/Baja_Costero/e74e05
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Nov 15, 2017 1:38 PM (+)]
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Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
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purpleinopp
Nov 15, 2017 1:48 PM CST
That's wonderful!

Stush's 'Topsy Turvy' inspired me to leave at least one of these Graptos alone to see what it does over a much longer period of time. The Graptos seem OK with it, the way they lean anyway. The Echeveria 'Gray Red' in my pic above became so top-heavy that the side branches dropped off.
👀😁😂 - SMILE! -☺😎☻☮👌✌∞☯🐣🐦🐔🐝🍯🐾
The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
👒🎄👣🏡🍃🍂🌾🌿🍁❦❧ 🍃🍁🍂🌾🌻🌸🌼🌹🌽❀☀🌺
☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.
Name: Sadie
North Carolina
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Sadiet
Nov 18, 2017 10:32 PM CST
Thank you all for your responses! They were immensely helpful. I think I'm going to leave the "branches" and let it grow out Smiling I'll update when it shows significant progress!
Name: Sadie
North Carolina
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Sadiet
Nov 18, 2017 10:38 PM CST
Baja_Costero said:Maybe it's just my overactive imagination Smiling , but it looks like all the new heads have also sprouted aerial roots (fine pale sideways hairs). I don't doubt they will grow out as branches regardless, just blurring the line between babies and branches... any new rosette on your plant, whatever the source, can be turned into a new plant by removing it and setting it in soil.

There is some disagreement about what to call branches on Aeoniums, for example (some people still prefer to call them offsets). It's sort of an esoteric discussion given the bottom line. In a sense, all babies coming from the main stem are branches. I normally reserve "offset" for a plant that branches at the base, or new rosettes that appear by way of rhizomes or stolons in the same general area. Roots are after the fact in my mind. But to each her own. Thumbs up


They do all have tiny aerial roots growing from their bases. Is this an indication of whether or not they will grow and become branches?
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
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Baja_Costero
Nov 18, 2017 11:05 PM CST

Moderator

I don't think the roots mean much of anything. Just a curious observation.

It would be great to see how your plant grows out of this.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Nov 18, 2017 11:06 PM (+)]
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Name: Paula
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
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Turbosaurus
Dec 7, 2017 3:35 PM CST
I would definitely leave them attached even if you have roots and could separate them (which you can.)

Two reasons- one they are still taking up nutrients from the stem that's got a nice full root system- no waiting for the new roots to develop. Second, I find that tiny babies are at risk when you attempt to root them becasue they are so close to the soil surface they are more likely to experience rot. Leave them where they are for best results.

kbossi
Dec 15, 2017 8:14 PM CST
I have a stem that's doing this right now too! I keep wondering if I should do anything with them, but I'm too afraid. Sad
Thumb of 2017-12-16/kbossi/5b1eab

Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Dec 22, 2017 8:04 AM CST
It depends on look you want . Clump or single stem. Don't be afraid to snap and twist them off to start more.
I'd personally, leave that one grow clumpy. Then, if I wanted any single stemed, all ya have to do is snap off a leaf and it will root. 👍
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Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
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purpleinopp
Feb 17, 2018 11:22 AM CST
What are folks' plants doing out there?

Another example. Ghost plant that over time (5 years) had leaned over, took root, and is now growing over the edge of mini garden. New stems are growing where it took root.
Thumb of 2018-02-17/purpleinopp/f53c62

👀😁😂 - SMILE! -☺😎☻☮👌✌∞☯🐣🐦🐔🐝🍯🐾
The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
👒🎄👣🏡🍃🍂🌾🌿🍁❦❧ 🍃🍁🍂🌾🌻🌸🌼🌹🌽❀☀🌺
☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.
Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
Tropicals Butterflies Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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purpleinopp
Mar 3, 2018 6:36 AM CST
Graptosedum doing it again. New "branches" forming along the older length of naked stem.
Thumb of 2018-03-03/purpleinopp/82ddb5

This one is happening on the newer part of stem. At first I thought it was an inflorescence but it's just a branch.
Thumb of 2018-03-03/purpleinopp/c863fe

👀😁😂 - SMILE! -☺😎☻☮👌✌∞☯🐣🐦🐔🐝🍯🐾
The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
👒🎄👣🏡🍃🍂🌾🌿🍁❦❧ 🍃🍁🍂🌾🌻🌸🌼🌹🌽❀☀🌺
☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.

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