Ask a Question forum: Maple tree

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San Diego
Cristiangee
Nov 12, 2017 2:40 PM CST
I️ just received my maple trees and I'm not sure if it has to do with the climate change but the leaves are starting to roll in and dry up, temperatures are in the 50f at night & 60-70f in the day ( which isn't that cold) in San Diego california. We haven't had sun so I'm not sure if that can effect it & i also fertilized it with some fish fertilizer and a sprinkle of food fertilizer before putting it in the containers.
The soil is great organic soil mixed with compost & it is well watered
Need help please
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Nov 12, 2017 3:37 PM CST
How long was it in box? Was the soil dry when you got it? When did the leaves start to curl and crisp?

I can think of a couple things that might be going on:

It looks like its suffering from mildew. That could be due to its humid and stuffy trip in a box. Or lack of air circulation where you have it now.

The crispy leaves could be because its going dormant - maples do lose their leaves in the winter. Or, you over fertilized. There might have been fertilizer in your potting soil and then you added two more kinds. That might have been overkill.

We recommend using fertilizer mixed at 1/4 to 1/2 strength on the packages recommended schedule. Also, a newly transplanted plant or a plant in some sort of distress doesn't need ferilizer at all.

Before you planted the tree, did you make sure the potting soil/compost mixture you used was completely moistened with no dry spots? Not even little dry spots? Soil that isn't adequately moistened causes two problems: Burned roots and dry pockets. If the soil was too dry, it won't absorb moisture without a little 'working' of the water into the soil. For peat based soil, that could be a day or so.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Nov 12, 2017 4:16 PM CST
I suspect it is from being transplanted bare-root while still in full leaf. The plant can't take up enough moisture to maintain turgidity in the leaves since it lost roots when it was prepared for shipping and some roots would have dried out en route. What were the roots packed in? I'm surprised to see that there is already branching quite low down on the plant, were they sold as seedlings?
San Diego
Cristiangee
Nov 13, 2017 12:44 PM CST
DaisyI said:How long was it in box? Was the soil dry when you got it? When did the leaves start to curl and crisp?

I can think of a couple things that might be going on:

It looks like its suffering from mildew. That could be due to its humid and stuffy trip in a box. Or lack of air circulation where you have it now.

The crispy leaves could be because its going dormant - maples do lose their leaves in the winter. Or, you over fertilized. There might have been fertilizer in your potting soil and then you added two more kinds. That might have been overkill.

We recommend using fertilizer mixed at 1/4 to 1/2 strength on the packages recommended schedule. Also, a newly transplanted plant or a plant in some sort of distress doesn't need ferilizer at all.

Before you planted the tree, did you make sure the potting soil/compost mixture you used was completely moistened with no dry spots? Not even little dry spots? Soil that isn't adequately moistened causes two problems: Burned roots and dry pockets. If the soil was too dry, it won't absorb moisture without a little 'working' of the water into the soil. For peat based soil, that could be a day or so.



It was 3 days in the box & there was no soil in the package, the roots were rapped with wet newspaper and a plastic & i believe the roots were trimmed out.
The leaves started to curl the day after i planted it in the containers & yes i wet it pretty good & even applied multch on top to keep it moist, i will soak it today tho just to make sure it gets every spot
San Diego
Cristiangee
Nov 13, 2017 12:46 PM CST
sooby said:I suspect it is from being transplanted bare-root while still in full leaf. The plant can't take up enough moisture to maintain turgidity in the leaves since it lost roots when it was prepared for shipping and some roots would have dried out en route. What were the roots packed in? I'm surprised to see that there is already branching quite low down on the plant, were they sold as seedlings?


The roots were wrapped in moist newspaper and plastic, is the leaves coming down a bad thing ?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Nov 13, 2017 1:49 PM CST
I am totally amazed that the company you bought it from bare rooted a tree that was not dormant. Take some photos and write them a letter.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org

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