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Name: Lucille
Texas
Lucillle
Nov 12, 2017 4:02 PM CST
One of my echevaria type plants has two stems that elongated and the stems now have flowers on them. Will the flowers form seeds?
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Cactus and Succulents Greenhouse Sempervivums Bromeliad
Adeniums Garden Ideas: Level 1 Tropicals Xeriscape Garden Art Plumerias
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plantmanager
Nov 12, 2017 4:05 PM CST
If they are pollinated. Is it indoors or outdoors?
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Name: Lucille
Texas
Lucillle
Nov 12, 2017 6:38 PM CST
It is indoors.
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Cactus and Succulents Greenhouse Sempervivums Bromeliad
Adeniums Garden Ideas: Level 1 Tropicals Xeriscape Garden Art Plumerias
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plantmanager
Nov 12, 2017 6:42 PM CST
More than likely, you won't have seeds, but stranger things have happened. I'd let the flower stalk stay on and dry until you make sure. I've cut my flowers off too early, and probably missed having some seeds.
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Name: Lucille
Texas
Lucillle
Nov 12, 2017 8:16 PM CST
The stalks are almost laying on the substrate so it is possible that I'll get plants from the stem and the seeds. I don't really need more plants right now but if some grow I can give them away and maybe help more people get interested in them.
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Cactus and Succulents Greenhouse Sempervivums Bromeliad
Adeniums Garden Ideas: Level 1 Tropicals Xeriscape Garden Art Plumerias
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plantmanager
Nov 12, 2017 8:40 PM CST
I've had some succulent stalks form new plants, but I am not good with Echeverias. I kill most of the them! I think I over water them. How often do you water yours? It must be happy if it's flowering.
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Name: Lucille
Texas
Lucillle
Nov 13, 2017 5:19 AM CST
I don't think I can take credit for its happiness, I've only had my indoor garden for a few months. So far I haven't watered on an exact schedule, just when I think they need water, and its only been a few times. The Lithops are in a separate little garden and get watered even less. The orchids, again they are separate, are watered every other day (except for the jewel orchids)but they are in leca so their roots don't stay wet.
I have to get them all through the winter, I am hoping they make it.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
Nov 13, 2017 11:01 AM CST

Moderator

So you know what you're looking for, Echeveria seeds are quite small and easy to miss. Wait until the flowers are all done and they will turn into little dry capsules, with the seeds inside (or not, as the case may be). I like to cut off the whole inflorescence and then go to a well lit area to dissect it on a white plate. First separate the capsules, then open each one up carefully (they may be partly open already) and shake out what's inside. It may be hard to distinguish seeds from flower debris but do the best you can. When you sow them it will become obvious pretty quick whether they're going to sprout or not.

My Echeverias are pollinated by hummingbirds and there are other flowering plants around to provide pollen, so you may get different results indoors with only one plant. At least you can become familiar with the anatomy of the flower stalk when you go looking for seeds, and that may be helpful next time, if nothing comes of this particular round of flowers.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
Nov 15, 2017 12:29 PM CST

Moderator

Here's what recently germinated Echeverias would look like. They are actually Dudleyas (close relative) but they look the same at this age. I left this pot underneath a flowering plant to collect whatever seeds might fall (letting nature handle the sowing, just like I let her handle the pollination), so these baby plants are all volunteers.

By this point, months after flowering, all the capsules are dry and open, and the wind scatters the seeds all over the patio. I could just collect the seeds that are left by cutting off the inflorescence and inverting it over a plate, but that would be more effort than letting mother nature handle the details. Smiling

Anyway, they're really small. For reference, those pumice rocks on top are at least a quarter inch wide.

Thumb of 2017-11-15/Baja_Costero/21b51b
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Nov 15, 2017 12:30 PM (+)]
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Name: Lucille
Texas
Lucillle
Nov 15, 2017 4:04 PM CST
Wow, those are tiny babies.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
Nov 15, 2017 4:47 PM CST

Moderator

Tiny seeds, tiny babies.

The Mexican 1 peso coin is 2cm, about 3/4 inch. Between a dime and a nickel.

[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Nov 15, 2017 5:23 PM (+)]
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Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Cactus and Succulents Greenhouse Sempervivums Bromeliad
Adeniums Garden Ideas: Level 1 Tropicals Xeriscape Garden Art Plumerias
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plantmanager
Nov 15, 2017 5:13 PM CST
Thanks for posting that pic of the seeds, Baja. I had no idea the seeds were that small! Hand sowing seems like it would be nearly impossible.
Handcrafted Coastal Inspired Art SeaMosaics!
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Nov 15, 2017 5:40 PM CST

Moderator

There's a lot of guesswork involved since it's hard to sow 1 seed at a time. You can just sprinkle freely and let the baby seedlings fight it out. Maybe a couple dozen plants will be left in that clay pot I set up, by the time they reach transplant age (thumbnail size). They are on our rooftop patio getting direct sun for just about the whole day, so they clearly can handle a lot of light from day one.

I think the usual strategy with Echeverias and Dudleyas is to make zillions of tiny seeds so that they can travel all over the place with the wind. The success rate of Dudleya seeds in nature (survival to flowering age) must be vanishingly small in most locations, but by casting them far and wide they manage to colonize rock faces, all sorts of nooks and crannies in nature. That one in a million (or whatever) location which guarantees them water and sun and nutrients in just the right proportions. Smiling
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Nov 15, 2017 5:45 PM (+)]
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