Views: 998, Replies: 17 » Jump to the end
Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Nov 13, 2017 6:35 AM CST
Any interest in starting a thread on Grafting Cacti in general, and intergeneric grafting in particular?

Cheers

Thumb of 2017-11-13/ausrpned/a56569

Name: Frenchy
Falls Church, VA (Zone 7b)
Container Gardener Dog Lover Houseplants Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Tomato Heads Hostas
Tropicals Annuals Foliage Fan Aroids Cactus and Succulents Sempervivums
Image
Frenchy21
Nov 13, 2017 1:38 PM CST
I would love to hear about other folks experiences with grafting cacti as I know very little about it. Smiling
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Bromeliad
Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Nov 14, 2017 5:11 PM CST

Moderator

I too would love to hear more, and especially see more pictures. Thumbs up
Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Nov 15, 2017 11:34 AM CST
Thanks for the interest, will post some info and photos of the work I've done to date, this coming week end.

Cheers
Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Nov 20, 2017 8:55 AM CST
Here are some photos of grafts done this year.Most of my grafting is field grafting which is challenging at times.

At this time most grafts are of seedlings, using a variety of methods with, both Epicotyl and Hypocotyl scions.

Most of the Epicotyl grafts are what I call flat grafts whereas for Hypocotyl grafts there is a greater variety, flat grafts,, horizontal grafts, insertion grafts.

The first photo shows two grafts, both to Pereskiopsis, most likely diguetii from what I have been told.

Thumb of 2017-11-20/ausrpned/1dd865

The scion on the left I believe is likely to be Austrocylindropuntia vestita whereas the scion on the right is a seedling Hylocereus hybrid.

Thumb of 2017-11-20/ausrpned/1d7f6b

This shows the same rootstock shown in the original post, it would be fully justified in having an identity crisis, it is covered in a large collection of scions, Cereus hybrids, Echinopsis hybrids, Echinocereus species, a Parodia, two different Epi Hybrids etc.

The feature in the photo is a C. repandus cross with Echinopsis huascha, the flowers are pleasing.

Thumb of 2017-11-20/ausrpned/72cc8f

This is one of the Pereskiopsis rootstocks I am using.

Thumb of 2017-11-20/ausrpned/5a51c9

I use Schlumbergera extensively as a rootstock, in this case have grafted three different clones onto another clone. This effectively gives four different flowers on the one plant.

Cheers
[Last edited by ausrpned - Nov 20, 2017 8:58 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1589537 (5)
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Bromeliad
Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Nov 20, 2017 7:46 PM CST

Moderator

Thank you for the guided tour. That "identity crisis" Cereus with all the grafted partners is pretty amazing. I had no idea that plants so far apart could all be grafted together. Inspiring! Thumbs up
Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Nov 20, 2017 8:38 PM CST
A few more photos.

Thumb of 2017-11-21/ausrpned/d98361
This is the current size of the triple grafted Schlumbergera. The red and pink scions flowered this year, hopefully the white flowered scion will do so next flowering Season.

Thumb of 2017-11-21/ausrpned/9901af
These are two other Pereskiopsis I have recently come across. The larger plant has a test graft to it the reason for letting the shoot develop is that I only have three plants of this clone at the moment, want to multiply it as quickly as possible.

Thumb of 2017-11-21/ausrpned/9484d3
These are some other grafts.

The middle and bottom row are not of the same seedling batch as the top potted grafts, they are from a different hybrid seed lot.

The middle row shows the use of a flat hypocotyl graft, it gives approximately the same success rate but scions develop more slowly at least a their current size.

Thumb of 2017-11-21/ausrpned/a60178
This is a field grafted scion, it has just started rapid growth.
__________________________________________________________
Update 5th January 2018.

The above scion is doing well, now 325mm with the growth rate a respectable 16mm since yesterday, hope that continues and the scion flowers next year.

Thumb of 2018-01-05/ausrpned/c5b3b9
___________________________________________________________
One thing to note is not all rootstocks and scions, even though they may be closely related, are compatible.

You can say, use a Hylocereus rootstock where one Epi grafts, grows and flowers, and another Epi does not perish but just sits there.

Find it worthwhile to do a test graft first before becoming too committed initially.

Cheers

[Last edited by ausrpned - Jan 4, 2018 7:09 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1589995 (7)
Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Dec 17, 2017 9:51 PM CST
One of my seedlings flowering for the first time.
Thumb of 2017-12-18/ausrpned/a3d9f4

Hopefully one of my Pereskiopsis plants is producing flower buds. It is suggested it is P. diguetii, may be flowers will help to give an accurate ID.
Thumb of 2017-12-18/ausrpned/174167

Here I am trying to rescue an Echinocereus which I thought I had lost.
Thumb of 2017-12-18/ausrpned/72b157

Raining here, most welcome.

Cheers
Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Dec 20, 2017 8:27 AM CST
Removed tiedowns from the rescue grafting attempt. Looks as if the graft is successful.

Thumb of 2017-12-20/ausrpned/0715c8

The tiedowns are of a stretch material with Cereus spines holding them in place.

Thumb of 2017-12-20/ausrpned/970c44

It makes life easier if they are removed after approximately a week, if that is not done the Cereus spines tend to be incorporated into the rootstock and become difficult to remove.
Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Dec 26, 2017 8:48 PM CST
This is a hypocotyl graft of a Selenicereus megalanthus seedling.

It appears to have achieved union with the Pereskiopsis rootstock but growth is not happening. Not unusual, I have some seedling grafts to Hylocereus which are >1yr old, they are still alive but that's all.

Thumb of 2017-12-27/ausrpned/8eaf73

I will remove the scion and try it on a Schlumbergera rootstock, not hopeful of success, nothing to lose though.
Name: Frenchy
Falls Church, VA (Zone 7b)
Container Gardener Dog Lover Houseplants Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Tomato Heads Hostas
Tropicals Annuals Foliage Fan Aroids Cactus and Succulents Sempervivums
Image
Frenchy21
Dec 27, 2017 12:25 AM CST
Do you treat the open cuts with anything or just leave them as is @ausrpned
Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Dec 30, 2017 7:10 AM CST
Hi Frenchy21

It depends, sometimes I do if it is a field graft and exposed to direct sunlight, strong hot winds.

Have never done so for grafts on Schlumbergera rootstocks, these are usually covered by an upturned jar which is first sprayed with water to provide a high humidity environment with the container moved to a darkened area for a week.

Cheers
Name: Frenchy
Falls Church, VA (Zone 7b)
Container Gardener Dog Lover Houseplants Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Tomato Heads Hostas
Tropicals Annuals Foliage Fan Aroids Cactus and Succulents Sempervivums
Image
Frenchy21
Dec 30, 2017 12:44 PM CST
Thank you @ausrpned. Never would have thought to use an upturned jar on these. Great idea. Thumbs up
Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Jan 4, 2018 6:22 PM CST


This is a scion of a Cleistocactus baumannii grafted to C. repandus. It flowers regularly since starting to do so in 2016.
Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Jan 9, 2018 11:23 AM CST
A grafting hazard, if the scion becomes too large, it could snap the stem making a bit of a mess.

Upside is a lot of material to start new plants or to serve as scions for more grafting.

Thumb of 2018-01-09/ausrpned/d14868

Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Jan 16, 2018 12:52 AM CST
Trying out doing Cereus seedling grafts using seedlings only a few days after germination.
Thumb of 2018-01-16/ausrpned/f00e84
The top graft was done on the 12th January, the bottom graft on the 14th January.

A difference of two days. Notice the top graft cotyledons have opened out, there is also a hint the shoot is forming.

Looks like the test will be successful.

Cheers

Update 7/2/18:

Thumb of 2018-02-07/ausrpned/511107
The first graft done is doing well the other is RIP(Rot In Peace), think it was just a little too small.

Will try again when there's a bit of spare time.

Cheers

Update 21/3/18:

Thumb of 2018-03-21/ausrpned/cf9bca

The scion is now large enough to harden off prior to grafting it to it's final rootstock.

Cheers
[Last edited by ausrpned - Mar 21, 2018 12:58 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1621739 (16)
Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
Tropicals Butterflies Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
purpleinopp
Mar 22, 2018 4:19 PM CST
Fascinating! I'm inspired.
👀😁😂 - SMILE! -☺😎☻☮👌✌∞☯🐣🐦🐔🐝🍯🐾
The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
👒🎄👣🏡🍃🍂🌾🌿🍁❦❧ 🍃🍁🍂🌾🌻🌸🌼🌹🌽❀☀🌺
☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.
Gingin Western Australia
ausrpned
Mar 23, 2018 7:27 PM CST
purpleinopp said:Fascinating! I'm inspired.


Good, I hope you try your own grafts and post results, both successes and failures.

Failures are important, once checked, it may save others much time.

Cheers


« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Cactus and Tender Succulents forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by Fleur569 and is called "Neon Anyone?"