Plant ID forum: I need information on this plant

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Fort Worth
Theotherguy
Nov 13, 2017 2:37 PM CST
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Fort Worth
Theotherguy
Nov 13, 2017 2:38 PM CST

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Perthshire. SCOTLAND. UK
Region: United Kingdom Plant Identifier
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Silversurfer
Nov 15, 2017 6:25 AM CST
1st pic really clear...leaves in opposite pairs, pairs of berries.
I would say Lonicera sp.
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purpleinopp
Nov 15, 2017 8:57 AM CST
It looks like this plant:
Amur Honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii)
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Name: Deb
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Bonehead
Nov 15, 2017 9:17 AM CST
Lonicera all have hollow stems, which would be another clue to your ID.

Correction edit: MOST lonicera have hollow stems, although not all of them do.
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[Last edited by Bonehead - Nov 17, 2017 11:43 AM (+)]
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Perthshire. SCOTLAND. UK
Region: United Kingdom Plant Identifier
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Silversurfer
Nov 17, 2017 10:13 AM CST
Bonehead said:Lonicera all have hollow stems, which would be another clue to your ID.


Sorry Bonehead but not all Lonicera sp have hollow stems...so that is not a safe diagnostic.

Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Deer Organic Gardener Ferns Herbs Beavers
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Bonehead
Nov 17, 2017 11:41 AM CST
Huh, I thought they did. On further research, though, I have found some sources claim that lonicera native to the US (relatively few) have solid stems, while those from Europe have hollow stems and many have escaped cultivation and become invasive in some areas. Further checking seems to not support this simplistic approach either. I have two natives: L. ciliosa (orange honeysuckle) which has a hollow stem, and L. involucrata (twinberry) which I cannot easily confirm whether its stem is hollow or solid. Guess I'll have to go out back and snap one to find out! I do know all my cultivated lonicera have hollow stems. Always learning, and my apologies for the mis-information.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
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Paul2032
Nov 17, 2017 11:53 AM CST
What about a Viburnum?
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Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Nov 18, 2017 7:36 PM CST
That's an Amur Honeysuckle - Lonicera maackii.

Look at the buds, the leaves, the fruit arrangement. Not any Viburnum, ever.
John

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