Photography forum: How Might One (beginner) Practice Indoors for Taking Outdoor Photos?

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Name: Teresa
Indiana (Zone 5b)
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TsFlowers
Nov 19, 2017 8:38 AM CST
I just don't like the cold that well, so tend not to go out when it's cold (even if it's Sunshiny), except for only that which I have to.

So anyone, please jump in (the water's warm), and share any ideas you might have that beginners could do to set up and take shots in their house, that might help them learn their camera, and take better photos later.

Thanks!!
. . . it's always better to ask questions, than jump to conclusions.
AND . . . always hear both sides of the story before making a judgment.
Name: Ruud
The Netherlands
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RuuddeBlock
Nov 19, 2017 3:21 PM CST
Taking pictures outside is definitely different (like contrast, light levels). But for you that is not necessarily all that important, just learn to know your camera. Use flash, then do the same pictures not using flash and try every possibility on your camera and compare results. The better you will know your ideal settings (which are dependant on the photographer as well as the camera) the more you will enjoy 'playing' outside when he season returns,

Ruud
Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan (Zone 5b)

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frankrichards16
Nov 20, 2017 5:12 PM CST
In January, February I take photos of all of my confers... outside.

I find that all the other plants near by do not interfere with getting a good photo.

Also, a lot of plants provide "winter interest"

Put a warm coat on and go outside:)
Name: Teresa
Indiana (Zone 5b)
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TsFlowers
Nov 20, 2017 5:19 PM CST
I'm thinkin', Mr. Richards, that that was encouragement. I tip my hat to you. Thank You!

I did have another thought though for others who might view here. When I first got this particular camera, the batteries weren't bad, but I was taking high resolution (pixel) files. The batteries, in my opinion were used up faster. So I dropped to low resolution files. I believe higher resolution files (photos) are better.

So my suggestion is that you buy a *good* set of rechargeable batteries, with charger for your camera. And an *extra* set too. That way one set could always be charging, and if your camera ran out of juice right in the middle of practice, or taking the shots you wanted, you already have another set ready to go.
. . . it's always better to ask questions, than jump to conclusions.
AND . . . always hear both sides of the story before making a judgment.
Name: Mika
Oxfordshire, England and Mento
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cliftoncat
Nov 27, 2017 2:47 PM CST
That's sensible, Teresa; I always have at least two batteries for each camera and keep the spare charged so I never get slowed down by a flat battery. I agree on the high resolution pics being better.

I'm no expert, but a few thoughts on starting in low light photography would be to get hold of a tripod, because you will have to get used to long exposures and if you hand hold the camera, your pics are likely to suffer from camera shake. Then just experiment with different settings. As well as changing the length of the exposure, try changing the F stop progressively and see how that affects the depth of field of your photos. It's an interesting exercise and will help you to get to know your camera. The great thing about digital photography is that you can take any number of pics and just delete the ones you don't like. Frank is right, go outside and have fun!

Name: Teresa
Indiana (Zone 5b)
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Butterflies Birds Bee Lover Annuals Seller of Garden Stuff Vegetable Grower
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TsFlowers
Nov 27, 2017 5:40 PM CST
Well, I went outside, a *beautiful* day at that! But as usual, too much work to do to have much fun. I did take a bunch of photos, but none practicing . . . time constraints again . . . shoot 'em fast and get on with the work that needs done. Sighing!
. . . it's always better to ask questions, than jump to conclusions.
AND . . . always hear both sides of the story before making a judgment.
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Nov 30, 2017 11:09 AM CST
It would help to know what type of camera you are working with. Also, what is it you want to capture in images when you are outside.
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Name: Sandy
Tennessee (Zone 6b)
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Lakeside
Nov 30, 2017 11:29 AM CST
In addition to flowers, I spend a lot of time photographing birds. Because they move around a lot and can shift quickly from the shadows to bright sun, one of the skills I've tried to learn (but am still not great at) is being able to quickly adjust the settings on my camera, preferably without having to lower the camera and look at the controls. That's something you could practice inside, just getting used to where all your camera's buttons are located and what they do.

Another good indoor exercise would be to take a series of photos of the same subject with different settings for ISO, aperture, shutter speeds, etc. Then load the photos up on your computer and note the differences. Indoor photography is also a good opportunity to learn about your camera's white balance settings, if it has an option to adjust that (makes the light look warmer/cooler). You could also play around with lighting sources, maybe by moving around some lamps, and see how having the light behind, beside, or in front of the object changes the photo.

If you have a camera that lets you shoot in RAW format, you can spend some time at the computer learning about how you can use photo processing software to adjust that RAW data to get the final photo you want.

Good topic! Now y'all have me thinking about going outside for some cold weather photos.

"People from a planet without flowers would think we must be mad with joy the whole time to have such things about us." ~ Iris Murdoch

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