Daylilies forum: Help! Old large overgrown day lilies need advice and guidance

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Xsnail
Nov 19, 2017 10:54 AM CST
Hey group! I am a guy and not a Gardner by any means so forgive me if I have silly questions. Restoring a 1920's home I bought about a year ago. The home was owned by one family since new and was a bit neglected but not constantly "redone". I mention this because I have no idea the age of these day lilies. Last year when first getting to work on it I cleaned all the weeds out of the flower garden area and trimmed dead leaves off the Lillies.

Questions

What are they exactly? (About 4 ft tall if that helps)

Is it safe to now cut them all the way back?

Could they be transplanted?

When the talks are straight and the flowers bloom they are so dang pretty and I think they just match the house. So any tips and assistance is greatly appreciated.

Location is Montgomery, al. (Lower middle half of state)


[Last edited by Xsnail - Nov 19, 2017 1:11 PM (+)]
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Name: Valerie
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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touchofsky
Nov 19, 2017 11:53 AM CST
What colour are they? Do you have any photos? That would help us identify them.

Yes, they can be cut back, especially if you are going to transplant them. It makes them easier to handle, and lets the plants adjust to the move. Daylilies transplant very well.

No question is silly, and feel free to ask. We love to talk daylilies and Welcome!
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Nov 19, 2017 12:16 PM CST
I have my doubts about them being daylilies, "when the stalks are straight" sounds nothing like a daylily.
Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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crawgarden
Nov 19, 2017 12:30 PM CST
Sounds like Lilium.
Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Nov 19, 2017 12:49 PM CST
Welcome!

At 4ft tall and overgrown, they could be the old "ditch lily", Hemerocallis fulva 'Europa'. Do they look like this?


Xsnail
Nov 19, 2017 1:16 PM CST
Thought I had them attached to the 1st post


Thumb of 2017-11-19/Xsnail/007d18
Thumb of 2017-11-19/Xsnail/4a0811


Thumb of 2017-11-19/Xsnail/926c24
Thumb of 2017-11-19/Xsnail/b39797


Thumb of 2017-11-19/Xsnail/b54ecc
Thumb of 2017-11-19/Xsnail/3754fe
Thumb of 2017-11-19/Xsnail/e50910
Thumb of 2017-11-19/Xsnail/062437


Xsnail
Nov 19, 2017 1:19 PM CST
Seedfork said:I have my doubts about them being daylilies, "when the stalks are straight" sounds nothing like a daylily.


They are normally straight but some are so large or maybe damaged they fall over. I attached pictures that so it a bit better.

Think there are a total of 8 main clusters of plants.

Xsnail
Nov 19, 2017 1:22 PM CST
sooby said: Welcome!

At 4ft tall and overgrown, they could be the old "ditch lily", Hemerocallis fulva 'Europa'. Do they look like this?



Nope, finally attached some pictures. Leaves are wide and strong plus the stalks or stems to the flowers are thing and strong.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
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sooby
Nov 19, 2017 2:12 PM CST
It's not a daylily. It's not a true lily (Lilium) either. Someone familiar with what grows in your climate there in Montgomery AL will be able to tell you what it is. If not here, you might want to post the pictures in the Plant ID forum.

Mocomom
Nov 19, 2017 4:09 PM CST
I think it is a crinum.
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Nov 19, 2017 4:24 PM CST
Xsnail, Welcome to the forum. I forgot to say that at the beginning.

I don't recognize the exact plant, but I do agree that it is probably some type of crinum.
Here is one type growing in my yard, I do have a few different types. That would be a typical "hand me down" type of plant found around old homes here in Alabama.
Thumb of 2017-11-19/Seedfork/26b24d
Thumb of 2017-11-19/Seedfork/7bde34

I have never cut mine back, but I would think that as long as the leaves are green they are building the bulbs for next year. Normally the frost and cold will kill the foliage back. When it does, you can trim them. Some crinums develop huge bulbs and are very hard to dig up. I have transplanted many of them and always had good luck, I have given them away and they always do well. It it might take them a year or two to settle in when transplanted.
[Last edited by Seedfork - Nov 19, 2017 4:33 PM (+)]
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Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
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needrain
Nov 19, 2017 4:48 PM CST
Welcome! @Xsnail

It's surely a crinum of some sort. In my part of Texas they are called Crinum Lilies as a common name. You would probably find this thread over on the Texas Forum interesting. Quite a few photos there. Crinum definitely match the vintage of your home. I have friends that have an old Sears home of similar vintage and the whole north side yard is a dense mass of crinums.
The thread "Solving this Crinum..." in Texas Gardening forum

I stumbled across some other info on crinums here and I think I found those by following threads under the photos of crinums in the database. You might check out crinums in the database and check some of those out.
Donald

Xsnail
Nov 21, 2017 8:30 PM CST
Thank you to everyone!!!!!
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
Dec 27, 2017 7:03 PM CST
is the same thing as a suprise lily? or are they different?
Name: Ken
East S.F. Bay Area (Zone 9a)
Region: California
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CaliFlowers
Dec 27, 2017 8:45 PM CST
Frillylily said:is the same thing as a suprise lily? or are they different?


Common names are subject to a lot of variables, and best avoided.

Crinum are generally tropical or subtropical, and for the most part, rather substantial bulbs.

'Surprise Lilies', as I know them, are Lycoris sp., generally small-to-medium size, fairly hardy bulbs, more along the lines of Nerine and Amaryllis belladonna, (Naked Ladies), but able to withstand colder winters.

There are good photographic examples of most of these in the database here, but for more comprehensive information, see the Pacific Bulb Society 'Photographs and Information' page;

http://www.pacificbulbsociety....

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