Cactus and Tender Succulents forum: Help with Zebra Plant

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Name: Wolf
Australia, Melbourne
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Facelesswolf
Nov 30, 2017 11:43 PM CST
I need a little help and advice with the condition of my zebra plants, I have three in a large pot with well draining soil and drain holes but two aren't looking too good, they are brown and soft to the touch while the third is doing fine (as seen in photos), the two that are brown are also very closed off compared to my other plants, they get a good amount of sunlight and get watered every 2 weeks like the others, any advice as too what wrong or tips would be great Smiling

Thumb of 2017-12-01/Facelesswolf/1d7cc0
Browning plant




Thumb of 2017-12-01/Facelesswolf/4f2343
Green and healthy plant
Name: Laurie b
Western Washington (Zone 7b)
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lauriebasler
Dec 1, 2017 12:09 AM CST
Brown leaves only, would mean too much sun. Brown and soft means overwatering. If they are really soft, remove those leaves, and check for root rot.
Name: Sue Taylor
Northumberland, UK
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kniphofia
Dec 1, 2017 12:12 AM CST
Anything brown and soft is in trouble. Check the roots. If you pull gently on one of the infected leaves and it comes off revealing damage to the centre or roots I would just get rid of the whole plant.
Name: Wolf
Australia, Melbourne
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Facelesswolf
Dec 1, 2017 2:14 AM CST
Thanks guys!
After digging them up I found that some of their roots had died but the center was still good, so I removed the dead roots and leaves, and replanted the "fresh" plant into new soil :)
Name: Kristi
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pod
Dec 1, 2017 10:46 PM CST
If I may also suggest, the Haworthias tend to go dormant for me in the cooler, short days of winter. I find they need less watering.

They will do well with minimal water as their roots tend to draw up at this time of year. That may be what you noticed.
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Dec 2, 2017 11:25 AM CST
Your green and healthy Haworthia is also in trouble, just a little behind the brown and soggys. Community plantings are really tough to maintain - all the plants in the pot get the same care, whether they like it or not. If your community containers are deep, allowing sufficient soil drying is almost impossible. Don't water on a schedule, water when the plants need it. I see a Jade beside the Haworthias. Jades need water when the leaves feel slightly soft.
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Name: Ken
East S.F. Bay Area (Zone 9a)
Region: California
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CaliFlowers
Dec 4, 2017 1:56 AM CST
Growing season depends on your climate and growing conditions. Most of my Haworthia tend to do most of their growing in the fall and early spring, with a slow down because of cool temperatures during winter, but still technically in a growth period. They shut down in the heat of summer. This is what they do in habitat. If you're in a climate that is too cold for them to grow outside n the cooler months, you'll have to watch them for signs of growth, and take advantage of that. The growing season is most obvious in the 'window' types, (truncata, maughanii, badia, comptoniana, splendens, mirabilis and the other retusoids) because they not only green up and swell with water, but the windows become more translucent. The hard-leaved forms like Zebra may be a little different in growth season, but I think they also tend to rest during the heat of summer. For me, Zebra tends to be more tolerant of bad treatment than many other Haws, which is probably why I don't really notice their growth/rest cycles so much.

When dividing Haworthia, make sure that the wounds of division have healed over in the shade for a few days, then set the pups in straight perlite or a very high mineral soil mix, such as equal parts pumice, perlite and Turface, with a half part of a good potting soil mixed in. Avoid sand, it just fills in the air spaces between the other particles in the mix. Full shade isn't essential, succulents need bright light to generate the energy to root, but don't let the mid-day sun beat down on them. Morning sun until about 11:00 works pretty well. Plants which are under too much stress sometimes root very slowly, or not at all. Don't water them heavily, the soil only needs enough moisture to prevent desiccation of the new root tips. I mist mine lightly with a pump bottle in the mornings, and wiggle-test them for rooting every two weeks or so. It may take them a while to re-establish.
Name: Wolf
Australia, Melbourne
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Facelesswolf
Dec 5, 2017 11:11 PM CST
It's currently spring/summer here so I don't think it was the cold weather haha
But the pups get some morning light and are in shade for most of the day and so far are doing alright
If all else fails and they don't take in the community pot, I'll pot them individually and see how that goes

Thanks everyone for your help, I'm a complete novices at this as these plants were a gift from my grandpa and before this I've never kept plants before so I'm very grateful for all the tips and tricks here
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Dec 17, 2017 1:20 PM CST
Wolf : I have one inside, in East facing kitchen window. It gets very little sun through down facing wood shutters. I've had it over 25 years. I water it every 6 weeks, year round.
😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.

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