Ask a Question forum: Transplanting Amaryllis

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Name: Walter Fritsch Jr
Connecticut (Zone 6a)
Retired Gone Postal, Retired Army T
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Wally2007
Dec 4, 2017 1:25 PM CST
Just today I transplanted almost four or five bulbs somewhat entwined, however appear to be fine. I put them in fresh soil, however there really isn't a sunny area in my home. All advice and recommendations would be greatly appreciated.
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Dec 4, 2017 3:40 PM CST
Not sure just what you did. Normally, small bulbets or offsets attached to the main bulb are removed before they are very large and then potted up separately. No need to uproot and disturb the entire rootball.

Also, at what stage is your Amaryllis? Normally, it would be coming out of dormancy at this time of year after a couple of months of being dried out.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Paula
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
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Turbosaurus
Dec 4, 2017 9:47 PM CST
Hi Wally,
I'm with Will- trying to figure out what stage of the annual life cycle the bulbs are in.. Have they been dormant? I see there's no growth, but I'm wondering if you let they dry out and go dormant, and if so how long ago? or if they recently got a little frost nip outside and you cut the foliage and immediately transplanted before you brought them inside for the winter? Or were they a recent acquisition that just finished flowering- it doesn't appear that way, but I guess its possible.

Little more background please.

When it is time for them to come out of dormancy, you can substitute artificial light to get them through the winter inside, but I want to figure out where we're starting first.

Name: Walter Fritsch Jr
Connecticut (Zone 6a)
Retired Gone Postal, Retired Army T
Image
Wally2007
Dec 5, 2017 2:38 PM CST
Thanks for your prompt reply. First of all in mid Oct I brought the entire planter inside in a dark dry environment. Last week I noticed one large leaf and other small bulbs appearing as if they were going to start growing. Well after a couple of weeks in the dark adding a little water and 10-10-10 sticks and I placed the whole planter inside getting sunlight and none of the growth seem to advance. So just yesterday I took the bulbs apart without separating the newer small ones which were entwined with many roots and put them in two other planters. I really can't remember if they bloomed inside or not. However while they were outside during the summer months I noticed some growth of leaves but not blossom.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Dec 5, 2017 6:18 PM CST
Ordinarily, you should have seen lots of healthy green leaves through the summer, but no flowers. Spring and summer are when the bulb gets renewed via good foliage growth. You were a bit late starting the dormancy, which should last for about 8 weeks. Then, resume the watering, but only after separating the offsets if that is your desire.

Usually, a single thorough watering after dormancy is all that is required to trigger new growth. If the bulb has been properly restored prior to dormancy, you should get one or more flower stalks, as well as new leaves.

That's the way it should work, but if the sequence is not followed carefully, then it may not flower and you will have to start the annual, cycle all over again.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Paula
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
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Turbosaurus
Dec 7, 2017 3:02 PM CST
That's fine- you did what you were supposed to do. Let them go dormant, and when you get new growth, repot and water. I usually wait until I have an inch or two of growth in the attic before I take them down and put them somewhere sunny.

Not much you can do now. They will either bloom or not, and that's going to be dependent on how much they bulked up this summer. Length of dormancy is recommended at least 8 weeks until they start to put up a flower stalk (if they're going to). They will definitely grow, but they may not bloom and there's nothing I know of that you can do now to change it. If they dont have leaves, don't water unless very dry.

As it seems like you know, the key to amaryllis is keeping them really happy through the summer in full sun and fertilized so the bulbs get big and fat and ready to bloom after a forced dormancy. If I were you I would put whatever is potted that hasn't sprouted back in the attic/garrage (dark dry)

I usually let mine go about the same as you- I start late on the dormancy becasue the sooner they bloom, the sooner they put up leaves inside. Without enough sun light (indoors january) they continue to struggle and the bulbs keep shrinking. The later I do it, the later they start to bloom and the foliage that feeds the bulbs doesn't have to struggle through January or February. If they don't start till February, outdoors is just around the corner. Besides, that way I can always buy new ones so I have blooms for Chirstmas.

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