Plant ID forum: Please ID Succulent

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Name: Cal McGaugh
Escondido, California (Zone 10b)
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EscondidoCal
Dec 5, 2017 6:49 PM CST


This is a "common" succulent, and I've grown it for many years, but don't remember the name, and
hadn't paid it much attention......but will from now on! Rolling my eyes.

It really caught my eye this year when it bloomed against a rock,
and gave me a new appreciation for it. Smiling

Thumb of 2017-12-06/EscondidoCal/1d08ff
Thumb of 2017-12-06/EscondidoCal/76e4ee

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Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Dec 5, 2017 6:56 PM CST
Look at Chandelier Plant aka Kalanchoe tubiflora and see if it matches.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Dec 5, 2017 7:04 PM CST
Link here

Chandelier Plant (Kalanchoe delagoensis)

This plant is extremely invasive in permissive climates. It spreads far and wide by way of plantlets it drops from the leaves (visible in your photo). That's not a big deal where frost will kill off the volunteers, but in a protected place like a greenhouse or in warmer microclimates, watch out. Smiling Word to the wise.
Name: Cal McGaugh
Escondido, California (Zone 10b)
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EscondidoCal
Dec 5, 2017 7:28 PM CST
Thanks, Greene! Smiling

Baja_Costero said:Link here

Chandelier Plant (Kalanchoe delagoensis)

This plant is extremely invasive in permissive climates. It spreads far and wide by way of plantlets it drops from the leaves (visible in your photo). That's not a big deal where frost will kill off the volunteers, but in a protected place like a greenhouse or in warmer microclimates, watch out. Smiling Word to the wise.
It grows well here, and am not worried about it invading...in fact, I will plant more close together to get an even
nicer bloom.

I like flowering plants that are self-propagating, and have several in the "invasive" category, and encourage them.
E.g. Hypoestes aristata, and Matilija poppies.

But thanks for the caution. Thumbs up


Learn & create something every day.

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[Last edited by EscondidoCal - Dec 5, 2017 7:31 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1598453 (4)
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Dec 6, 2017 12:19 PM CST
To each their own (of course! Smiling ), I would just stress what makes "invasive" different from self-seeding, self-regenerating, or naturalizing. In your climate, naturally. If only to stay on top of the situation given its potential to spiral out of control.

One, installing this Kalanchoe can be a hard decision to reverse because if you change your mind later, you may end up pulling plantlets for years. I say this from experience in a zone that's permissive to these plants. Your mileage may of course vary.

Two, these plants may have the potential to leave your garden and take over the surrounding area. I've been to more than one botanical garden in central Mexico where these specific Kalanchoes (grown for their pretty flowers in the garden) have taken over the surrounding areas, including habitat, by the zillions. On the altiplano, which is generally a pretty rough place for plants.

I'm the first to admit that I have planted a few succulents which can be invasive in our climate (by those standards) but I have tried to keep them on a short leash, so to speak. A couple I have really regretted.

Carpobrotus for example is universally popular in highway landscaping around here, and as a result has made its way into fragile coastal habitat where some of my favorite native succulents grow. Thumbs down The main problem is that Carpobrotus spreads incredibly easily from cuttings tossed by the side of the road, and the same drought-resistant features that make it popular in public landscaping allow it to survive neglected elsewhere through our annual summer droughts, and overrun the much slower natives, quite literally.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Dec 6, 2017 12:23 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1598762 (5)
Name: Cal McGaugh
Escondido, California (Zone 10b)
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EscondidoCal
Dec 6, 2017 5:43 PM CST
Baja_Costero said:To each their own (of course! Smiling ), I would just stress what makes "invasive" different from self-seeding, self-regenerating, or naturalizing. In your climate, naturally. If only to stay on top of the situation given its potential to spiral out of control.

One, installing this Kalanchoe can be a hard decision to reverse because if you change your mind later, you may end up pulling plantlets for years. I say this from experience in a zone that's permissive to these plants. Your mileage may of course vary.

Two, these plants may have the potential to leave your garden and take over the surrounding area. I've been to more than one botanical garden in central Mexico where these specific Kalanchoes (grown for their pretty flowers in the garden) have taken over the surrounding areas, including habitat, by the zillions. On the altiplano, which is generally a pretty rough place for plants.

I'm the first to admit that I have planted a few succulents which can be invasive in our climate (by those standards) but I have tried to keep them on a short leash, so to speak. A couple I have really regretted.

Carpobrotus for example is universally popular in highway landscaping around here, and as a result has made its way into fragile coastal habitat where some of my favorite native succulents grow. Thumbs down The main problem is that Carpobrotus spreads incredibly easily from cuttings tossed by the side of the road, and the same drought-resistant features that make it popular in public landscaping allow it to survive neglected elsewhere through our annual summer droughts, and overrun the much slower natives, quite literally.

Too bad they've gotten out of control, but on the other hand, they must be impressive when blooming enmass.

I've never seen it as a problem here inland or on the coast, though others may.

My greatest nemesis in the garden is asparagus fern, Asparagus aethiopicus.....should be outlawed, imho! =O
No offense to fern enthusiasts Big Grin




Learn & create something every day.

"Take only pictures. Leave only footprints."
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
Dec 6, 2017 6:33 PM CST
EscondidoCal said:
Too bad they've gotten out of control, but on the other hand, they must be impressive when blooming enmass.

I've never seen it as a problem here inland or on the coast, though others may.


Carpobrotus is the worst known offender as invasive succulents go in the region. It's a problem up and down the California coast and well into Baja California. There's nothing good about Carpobrotus after it escapes from public landscaping.... it doesn't belong in the ecosystem, it doesn't help the ecosystem, and the natives that it replaces make way better flowers if you ask me. Fortunately the situation has been known for some time and improved management has reduced the rate of spread.

https://www.calflora.org/cgi-b...
http://www.cal-ipc.org/plants/...
Name: Cal McGaugh
Escondido, California (Zone 10b)
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EscondidoCal
Dec 6, 2017 7:11 PM CST
re: Carpobrotus.....aka pickle weed......I grew up with it, and used to have "fights" with my friends when we were growing up in Del Mar, throwing it at each other....brings back good childhood memories. Sighing!

Didn't know we were contributing to its spread. D'Oh!






Learn & create something every day.

"Take only pictures. Leave only footprints."

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