Houseplants forum: Whats going on here

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MR1970
Dec 9, 2017 5:08 PM CST
I don't have much of a green thumb so maybe someone here can answer this. What is happening with this flower pot in the provided picture? There is an amber crust and its oozing a amber colored liquid. Its an old plant. Probably about 7 years old. Thanks in advance!
Thumb of 2017-12-09/MR1970/e42848

Name: Frenchy
Falls Church, VA (Zone 7b)
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Frenchy21
Dec 9, 2017 11:32 PM CST
Do you have a picture of the plant in the pot? That could help with figuring out the problem. Smiling
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
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sallyg
Dec 10, 2017 7:56 AM CST
Ditto,
we'd like to see the whole plant- but if you're only asking about the crud,
I would think it's a buildup of mineral crud in that reservoir, Scrub off the part you see. You can probably pop that tray off but might be hard to line it up to snap back on.
Or you can pull the plant roots out of the pot, investigate the pot, and put it back after. - IF the plant has a good solid rootball that it should have after many years in one pot. Sometimes it very surprising what's going on down there.
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MR1970
Dec 10, 2017 11:20 AM CST
Frenchy21 said:Do you have a picture of the plant in the pot? That could help with figuring out the problem. Smiling


Sorry about the pic. Here is the plant in the pot. I water it and it gets good light. Thanks all for the help so far. I've had this plant for a long time and want to keep it healthy


Thumb of 2017-12-10/MR1970/44d36e

Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
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sallyg
Dec 10, 2017 12:10 PM CST
No problem, thanks for adding the pic.
You have a basic Philodendron, very tough plant and looks healthy enough. Again, I think it's a buildup of minerals in the tray, nothing 'growing'.
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)

MR1970
Dec 10, 2017 12:20 PM CST
sallyg said:No problem, thanks for adding the pic.
You have a basic Philodendron, very tough plant and looks healthy enough. Again, I think it's a buildup of minerals in the tray, nothing 'growing'.

Thanks for your reply. So I just need to remove the bottom of the pot, clean, put back on and it should be ok? I also love Kettle chips AND corn!

[Last edited by MR1970 - Dec 10, 2017 12:21 PM (+)]
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Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Mid-Atlantic Composter Region: Maryland Birds
Cat Lover Dog Lover Region: United States of America
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sallyg
Dec 10, 2017 7:45 PM CST
That's it, MR. DO that and resume what you've been doing.

Now, no cause for panic if it's been seven years before you found this problem. When you water and fertilize, there are minerals left behind. Avoid this by watering enough that it drips out the bottom and drains each time. But many people don't want to deal with dripping. And if this has been in the same pot and soil all this time, soaking it may leave you with a soggy wet root rot situation. There may not be a lot of actual roots in that pot at this point.

If you can collect rainwater or use filtered water, the minerals won't build up, or as fast.

I have cared for a philo like that in a commercial setting that took a lot of neglect and kept on truckin. But it's not my favorite way of keeping plants.

I hope other users correct me if I am off.

..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)

MR1970
Dec 10, 2017 9:01 PM CST
Thanks for the advise! Glad its nothing serious. My water is loaded with minerals here. There's coral on all the faucet heads. The rain water idea sounds good. How about melted snow?
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
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sallyg
Dec 11, 2017 7:51 AM CST
Melted snow absolutely!
I rarely add fertilizer to house plants, but let them have whatever gentle natural organic gook they get from the rain barrel, goldfish pot, etc...
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Dec 12, 2017 9:18 AM CST
I would remove the bottom of the pot & leave it off. I have been given a few of these "self-watering pots" and it required banging with a hammer to knock (break) off the drip tray. There are probably some designed to come apart & go back together, but just wanted you to know that mine did not, if you want to retain the tray.

Water left in a drip tray can make plants ill, even be fatal in extreme cases. Might be handy in a desert but not practical for my plants that are out in the weather most of the year in AL.

This plant looks like it has spider mites from the spider webbing and deformed leaves.

If this was my plant, I would cut off everything above the soil, start new roots in water & start over in fresh soil when ready to be re-planted. There's no reason to go through the effort to repot a vine, IMO/E. This would make it easy to gently rinse/rub any mites off of the leaves, and remove dust, a clean, gorgeous new start.
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Name: CatDrk
California (Zone 9b)
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CatDrk
Dec 14, 2017 12:49 PM CST
I agree that your plant is a Philodendron and that they are very hardy plants. Before my manager retired in July 2017, she gave me her Philodendron and it was all brown and looked dead. I own houseplants but never had a Philodendron before so I just read up on their care. I bought a pot w/drainage from a Garden Center and re-potted and pruned it...then I waited three days and watered it. It's been five months now and I've attached a picture (below) of what my plant looks after a little TLC Smiling My point is that these guys are hard to kill, but I think your plant might have a bacterial infection. Some trees get what's called "Wetwood Bacteria" and leak sap.

I am not an expert, just someone who has kept common houseplants for years. If this was happening to my Philodendron I would:
1. Take the plant out of the pot and wash off all the soil.
2. Trash the pot and the soil the plant was in.
3. Look at the roots. If there are no dark brown, black or rotted roots I would transplant it into a new pot with new soil and wait a couple of days before watering with "distilled" water. I've had good results using distilled water and it's cheap to buy.
4. If there are good roots but some dark brown, black or rotted roots I would: cut off the rotted roots with sterilized scissors, let the plant air dry for 1-3 days (until roots dried), and then lightly coat roots with honey and transplant it into a new pot with new soil. Then wait 2-3 days before watering lightly. Crossing Fingers!
5. If all the roots are dark brown, black or rotted then it's too late to save the plant and it would have to be thrown away. I would not even try to do a cutting from the plant as the stem could also be infected.


This is what my Philodendron looks like now
Thumb of 2017-12-14/CatDrk/159ef7

[Last edited by CatDrk - Dec 14, 2017 12:57 PM (+)]
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Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
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Carter
Dec 15, 2017 10:15 PM CST
As previously mentioned, this just appears to be mineral buildup from water dripping out of the bottom. Just clean it off is all you have to do. Otherwise you philo looks pretty healthy and I see no sign of spider mites or other issues with the plant itself.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Dec 16, 2017 1:20 PM CST
I agree with Carter. The plant looks healthy so it is important not to over-react to what may be some minerals salts that have accumulated in the bottom of the pot. The build-up of mineral slats could be a problem long-term, so if your water is on the hard side use filtered, distilled or rain (snow) water. But don't do anything drastic like disturbing the roots or changing the soil.
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