Ask a Question forum: Grass or moss for gnat problem

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NJ
CanT
Dec 12, 2017 2:14 PM CST
One day somehow in my house plants, there were gnats. They are SOOO ANNOYING! they attack on my face at least 40 times a day and opens a suicide party on my soup.
This summer, I was able to get rid of them by moving sun loving plants outdoor, and covering sands on top and tray of the pots indoor. After they were completely gone from my house, I re-potted them in a larger container without the sand because sand looks awful, makes mess, mixes with the soil, which I have to throw them all out. BUT ONE DAY IN AUTUMN NIGHT I opened a door when outdoor wall light was on. It had a lot of insects hanging around and.. that was the day gnats entered my house again.

I tried cinnamon, coffee ground but none of them seems to work. Plant in the gnat farm pot will die when the pot drys out, so only other solution is sands or.. ground cover plants as far as I heard.

I'm thinking to plant actual grass on it ,but does anyone have an idea of what should be better?

-I'd love it to be edible plant
-It needs to have small root system
-Can live without direct sunlight
-Nice if it looks good, or easy to get
-Have to reproduce tightly so gnats won't get in

Will be thankful if you could help me.
[Last edited by CanT - Dec 12, 2017 2:19 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1601981 (1)
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Dec 12, 2017 3:05 PM CST
The source of your gnat problem is the soil you are using. Potting mixes that include garden soil, compost, and bark are often infested with gnat larvae. It is best to use a potting mix that has only peat, coir and perlite. It may be hard to find so you may need to mix your own.

The larvae that you have now live primarily in the upper inch or two of soil. Remove and discard any loose soil that is not in immediate contact with the roots. Then, allow the remaining soil to dry close to the wilt point of the plant. Depriving the larvae of moisture is the best deterrent. The presence of gnats is also often indicative of over watered plants and potential root rot. Keep your plants as dry as possible.

Grass and moss will both require keeping the soil very moist and will be counter-productive for your gnat problem.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
NJ
CanT
Dec 12, 2017 3:32 PM CST
Thanks for the answer. I don't know where I saw ground cover plant could solve gnats, and I guess I shouldn't. About the soil I use, it sure isn't good quality of soil. However, I'm not going to invest to buy a new soil because they're expansive, but thanks anyway.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Bromeliad
Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator
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Baja_Costero
Dec 12, 2017 3:40 PM CST
Use sticky paper (flypaper) close to the surface of the soil for fastest results with gnats indoors. This only reduces the scale of the problem and doesn't eliminate it entirely, but the difference is huge.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Dec 12, 2017 3:40 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1602029 (4)
NJ
CanT
Dec 12, 2017 5:06 PM CST
I'd rather stick to sands rather than purchasing sticky paper all the time. As I said it's messy and stuff, but I can leave them alone forever after that. Also they just cost 4 dollar per 50 lb on homedepot so.. that's better for me but thanks for the reply.
There's another choice to purchase pinguicula the live sticky paper if you know... mines almost dead now due to lack of knowledge to care.
[Last edited by CanT - Dec 12, 2017 5:09 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1602060 (5)
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Bromeliad
Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Dec 12, 2017 5:15 PM CST
Sounds like you have a reasonably helpful solution then. Thumbs up I don't replace the sticky paper more than a couple times a year, and use a small piece of about a couple of square inches at a time, so $ is not a factor for me. I bought pretty much a lifetime supply on Amazon for $10. I have to avoid the sand because my plants are all succulents and they aren't happy about anything that interferes with the ability of water to evaporate from the soil. So thus the choice I have made. Anyway, I hope you find the best solution for your needs.

Welcome!
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Dec 12, 2017 5:16 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1602063 (6)
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Dec 12, 2017 5:46 PM CST
You could try a wine trap. Works pretty good.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Dec 12, 2017 5:59 PM CST
DE, Diatomasous Earth, on top of soil works good.
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
NJ
CanT
Dec 12, 2017 6:07 PM CST
Yeah.. I ended up covering with sand.. had to clean up sand messes so hard. Wish there was a better solution, but .. eh
[Last edited by CanT - Dec 12, 2017 6:14 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1602082 (9)
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Dec 12, 2017 6:13 PM CST
Wine only captures some of the flying adults but has no effect on the larvae in the soil. Diatomaceous earth works only as long as it remains dry.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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