Ask a Question forum: Planter-pot ideas for climbing rose

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India
Powb
Dec 15, 2017 6:43 AM CST
Hello,
I'm thinking of planting a climbing rose plant into a big planter , for it to grow bigger.
Since the branches/vines are usually thin, planter may look empty.
So can I put any other plants together with climbing rose plant that has same water requirements as that of climbing rose?
If no other plant is possible, can I at least, plant more than one climbing rose plants in the same planter??



Thank you.
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
Image
Philipwonel
Dec 15, 2017 7:51 AM CST
Nasturtium flowers. Train them up canes ,and let them trail over pot.
😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
India
Powb
Dec 15, 2017 7:58 AM CST
Ok @Philipwonel. Will search for those.
Thank you for ur reply 😊
You can provide me with more ideas as well..
Name: Caroline Scott
Calgary (Zone 4a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Peonies Lilies Enjoys or suffers cold winters Winter Sowing
Bulbs Region: Canadian Garden Ideas: Master Level Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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CarolineScott
Dec 15, 2017 11:41 AM CST
Climbing nasturtiums would work----not the mounding kind.
Scarlet runner beans, or any climber.
Clematis maybe.
Also you can prune the rose so that eventually it has flowers all the way up. You prune it as if the canes were stairs.
India
Powb
Dec 15, 2017 3:06 PM CST
Thank you for your reply @CarolineScott.
Will see for these options as well. ☺
Name: Sue
SF Bay Area, CA (Zone 9b)
Container Gardener Canning and food preservation Dog Lover
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Zuni
Dec 15, 2017 11:20 PM CST
I have a similar problem and I haven't tried it yet, but I can share my idea with you.

I only have a balcony now, so I have to grow everything in containers. I am going to buy a crape myrtle tree (dwarf) to put in a large container that I already bought. I'm waiting for a tree sale at the end of the month at my local nursery to buy the tree.

This tree will be most happy if it doesn't share the soil in it's pot. but, it will have a straight trunk about 6 feet high, then provide me with a shade canopy (in my perfect mind's eye anyway). So, I really want to make the pot look more appealing, and also to use that space for more plants, since I'm so limited for space for plants.

What I'm going to do, is just put other potted plants on top of the soil around my tree. That way, if I need to move them to water them more than my tree, or the other way around, I can do that. And they won't interfere with the soil in my tree's pot. As long as I'm careful about not harming the trunk of the tree, I think it will work out fine. And then, I can just change whatever potted plants I want to put around my tree.

So, maybe that will work for you, too? Just let your roses have all of the soil in your new pot. But, set other potted plants on top of that soil. They would in effect, work as a kind of mulch, too, keeping the soil protected for the rose.

But, any moisture-loving plant would use the same amount of water as a rose, I'm thinking.

Personally, I would not put a vining plant in with another vining plant. I'm more of a purist. I'd want them separated. So, I'd let the roses climb by themselves, then put something that stayed shorter underneath them.

If they'll be in full sun, you'd have so many great options. I'd try to find something that does not attract the same types of pests as roses. Something that aphids don't like, for instance, as they love roses.

What is your hardiness zone?

I just searched the internet for "good companion plants for roses," and found a great article. I'm not sure if I can link to other sites here, but you could do the same search. But, a couple recommendations in the article are:

Perennials: lavender (Lavandula), catmint (Nepeta), lady's mantle (Alchemilla) and pinks (Dianthus).

For annuals, heliotropes (Heliotropium), summer-snapdragon (Angelonia), lantana (Lantana), verbena (Verbena) and million bells petunia (Calibrachoa).

India
Powb
Dec 19, 2017 10:21 AM CST
Thank you for ur reply @zuni
I'm not sure about hardiness zone, but from the information I got , I think it is 13 .. I live near Mumbai, India.


Name: Sue
SF Bay Area, CA (Zone 9b)
Container Gardener Canning and food preservation Dog Lover
Image
Zuni
Dec 19, 2017 9:55 PM CST
Powb said:Thank you for ur reply @zuni
I'm not sure about hardiness zone, but from the information I got , I think it is 13 .. I live near Mumbai, India.




Oh, how lovely! You have so many wonderful tropical options. You'd need sun for roses, so just look for something that will grow in sun. Is it also humid? If you had the space, you could grow the roses at the back, then something less tall, then something even shorter in front of those plants. Depends on how deep your bed is.

I found a great website using this search term: "zone 13 perennials companion plant with roses"

This website won't let me link to the website, but just use a search engine with that search phrase, and you'll find some good plants that will look nice with your roses and help keep the bugs away.
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Dec 19, 2017 10:37 PM CST
@Powb

I'm thinking of planting a climbing rose plant into a big planter , for it to grow bigger.
Since the branches/vines are usually thin, planter may look empty.


With roses, the size of the canes is not necessarily a good indicator as to how large or how dense a mature plant will be. I think a couple of photos can show you better than I can explain ... Smiling

These are photos of the miniature climbing rose 'Candy Cane'

This photo shows the thin canes



This is a photo of the whole plant



Smiling

The plant in the photo above is growing at the San Jose Heritage Rose Garden. It was trained to grow into a dense climbing rose.

Here's a link to the rose page in our database
Rose (Rosa 'Candy Cane')

I am hesitant to grow climbing roses in containers because roses grow their roots first and climbing roses grow large root masses to support tall roses. They quickly become root bound.

Something you might want to consider, if they are available to you, is growing a tree rose, or what is called a 'standard'.

I couldn't readily find a photo in our database for you, but if you Google "tree rose", you can see a lot of images.

Zuni / Sue wrote This tree will be most happy if it doesn't share the soil in it's pot. but, it will have a straight trunk about 6 feet high, then provide me with a shade canopy (in my perfect mind's eye anyway). So, I really want to make the pot look more appealing, and also to use that space for more plants, since I'm so limited for space for plants.

The same would be true if you planted a tree rose, but the tallest tree rose I have seen on the US market is four feet tall.

I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
India
Powb
Dec 21, 2017 2:57 PM CST
Zuni said:

Oh, how lovely! You have so many wonderful tropical options. You'd need sun for roses, so just look for something that will grow in sun. Is it also humid? If you had the space, you could grow the roses at the back, then something less tall, then something even shorter in front of those plants. Depends on how deep your bed is.

I found a great website using this search term: "zone 13 perennials companion plant with roses"

This website won't let me link to the website, but just use a search engine with that search phrase, and you'll find some good plants that will look nice with your roses and help keep the bugs away.


Thanks again for your reply.
We usually have hot dry climate here
And I'll surely search using that Phrase.

P.S. I'm new to this forum and just learnt this 'quote' option. Big Grin
India
Powb
Dec 21, 2017 3:46 PM CST
RoseBlush1 said:@Powb

I'm thinking of planting a climbing rose plant into a big planter , for it to grow bigger.
Since the branches/vines are usually thin, planter may look empty.


With roses, the size of the canes is not necessarily a good indicator as to how large or how dense a mature plant will be. I think a couple of photos can show you better than I can explain ... Smiling

These are photos of the miniature climbing rose 'Candy Cane'

This photo shows the thin canes



This is a photo of the whole plant



Smiling

The plant in the photo above is growing at the San Jose Heritage Rose Garden. It was trained to grow into a dense climbing rose.

Here's a link to the rose page in our database
Rose (Rosa 'Candy Cane')

I am hesitant to grow climbing roses in containers because roses grow their roots first and climbing roses grow large root masses to support tall roses. They quickly become root bound.

Something you might want to consider, if they are available to you, is growing a tree rose, or what is called a 'standard'.

I couldn't readily find a photo in our database for you, but if you Google "tree rose", you can see a lot of images.

Zuni / Sue wrote This tree will be most happy if it doesn't share the soil in it's pot. but, it will have a straight trunk about 6 feet high, then provide me with a shade canopy (in my perfect mind's eye anyway). So, I really want to make the pot look more appealing, and also to use that space for more plants, since I'm so limited for space for plants.

The same would be true if you planted a tree rose, but the tallest tree rose I have seen on the US market is four feet tall.



Thank you, for this information as well. Smiling
Actually, just rose bushes are common here. And just seeing how climbers fill up the trellis with roses, made me buy that.
So, if roots grow too much, I might have to plant it separately.

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