Tropicals forum: Costus Barbatus ~ Spiral Ginger

Views: 271, Replies: 3 » Jump to the end
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Dec 17, 2017 11:15 PM CST
I was given a few of these rhizomes and have no knowledge of growing them.

Hopefully someone can tell me what to expect.



How tropical are they? Do I need to keep them in a container or plant in the ground in my zone 8a?

Sun or shade? Will one be better than the other?

Moisture levels? Do these require constant moisture?

Soil? I have a sandy clay. If I plant in ground, I probably need suggestions for amending the soil.

How large will this ginger grow? Need to know if I should plant in the back of a bed or away from the house.


I look forward to the blooms but you can tell I wasn't expecting these and need any assistance on the basics.

Please & Thank You!

edited to add an afterthought... are these fragrant?


Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
[Last edited by pod - Dec 18, 2017 8:07 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1604530 (1)
Name: Sherri
Winter Springs, FL (Zone 9b)
Region: Florida Butterflies Birds Bee Lover Bromeliad Tropicals
Foliage Fan Native Plants and Wildflowers Salvias Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Garden Photography
Image
sunkissed
Dec 31, 2017 8:49 AM CST
I don't have that particular Ginger, but do have Costus woodsonii and Costus spiralis. Mine are in the ground and will freeze back if we dip below 32, but have always come back in the spring, your ginger is listed as zone 11, so putting in a nice sized container probably be best and protect in cold. Of course I live in FL so they get quite a bit rain and humidity. As far as height, each of mine are quite different but the Costus spiralis can get quite tall, a good six foot or more, I ready your ginger can go up to 8 foot.
I don't know about fragrance on the Costus Barbatus, but neither of mine are fragrant but you can eat the yellow flowers, they remind me of sweet tarts.
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Dec 31, 2017 11:26 AM CST
Thanks so much.... 8 foot tall might be a handful in container but I think that will be what I do.

I've read that if the leaf stalks freeze to the ground, it won't kill the plant but it also won't bloom next summer.

If I can develop more plants, I might try some in ground as well to experiment.

Thank you Sherri! Happy New Year...

Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Sherri
Winter Springs, FL (Zone 9b)
Region: Florida Butterflies Birds Bee Lover Bromeliad Tropicals
Foliage Fan Native Plants and Wildflowers Salvias Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Garden Photography
Image
sunkissed
Jan 3, 2018 7:25 AM CST
My original Costus spiralis are in a large container, have done fine for many years, but then the roots may be going out the hole into the ground, I've never moved the container. Green Grin!

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Tropicals forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by sunnyvalley and is called "Dahlia Bristol Stripe"