Ask a Question forum: Repotting Monstera Deliciosa

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Name: Jacob Fuentes
los angeles (Zone 10b)
jacfue
Dec 22, 2017 5:33 PM CST
I bought this massively rootbound monstera and i need to repot it. It is in a 6in pot and loos very tight so im wondering if the next pot is 8in? I asked around and someone said double the size like a 12in pot but i feel that is too big. Help 😊
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Dec 22, 2017 5:54 PM CST
A pretty solid rule for repotting is one size larger only. If you put it into a pot that is too large, you will have to add a lot of extra soil that may take too long to dry out and the result may be root rot. In addition, plants tend to grow best when they are moderately potbound. Move it to an 8-inch pot.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Dec 22, 2017 9:52 PM CST
I agree with WillC and will add:

Cut the pot off with some heavy shears. Try to save as many roots as possible.
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Name: Sue
SF Bay Area, CA (Zone 9b)
Container Gardener Canning and food preservation Dog Lover
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Zuni
Dec 23, 2017 12:07 AM CST
I'm a bit of a rebel on this subject. I don't like dealing with repotting constantly, and my theory is that plants in their natural environment don't move from one location to another that is only 1 inch wider than the last one.

That said, sometimes a plant will not give you great foliage or flowers/fruit, unless they feel they are near death - aka until they feel they are a tad root bound. It can be a way to trick them into giving us the foliage and flowers/fruit we want from them, while continuing to give them everything else they need to stay alive, even if they think they must be about to die LOL.

So, since I would be okay with waiting for more foliage - or better yet, because I think I can get them to blossom and grow anyway, by giving them fertilizer - I would personally, repot that sucker into a 12 inch pot.

But, like I say, I'm a bit of a rebel on this subject. But, unless you are really careless with watering, I don't think you need to worry about root rot. In my experience, the worst thing that would happen, is your plant would spend it's energy on roots for a while, instead of foliage/flowers/fruit.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Dec 23, 2017 7:06 AM CST
The dynamics of irrigation of plants planted in the ground vs. those in a pot are very different. It is certainly quite possible to move a plant into an overly large pot and water it successfully. However, unless you are fairly experienced and pay close attention to watering, the chances of keeping the soil too moist for too long are greatly increased with an oversized pot. Overpotting and the resultant root rot is one of the most common of all sources of plant problems. That is why it is generally recommended to not overpot a plant, especially for those who are less experienced with potted plants.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Jacob Fuentes
los angeles (Zone 10b)
jacfue
Dec 23, 2017 11:09 AM CST
I also heard that putting some coffee filter or screen mesh in the bottom of the pot helps with loss of soil but im afraid the water wont drain well. Implanning on using terra cotta pots btw.
Name: Sue
SF Bay Area, CA (Zone 9b)
Container Gardener Canning and food preservation Dog Lover
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Zuni
Dec 23, 2017 10:37 PM CST
WillC said:The dynamics of irrigation of plants planted in the ground vs. those in a pot are very different. It is certainly quite possible to move a plant into an overly large pot and water it successfully. However, unless you are fairly experienced and pay close attention to watering, the chances of keeping the soil too moist for too long are greatly increased with an oversized pot. Overpotting and the resultant root rot is one of the most common of all sources of plant problems. That is why it is generally recommended to not overpot a plant, especially for those who are less experienced with potted plants.


Makes perfect sense. I think in my advanced years, I forget what it was like to be new at some things. Smiling
Name: Sue
SF Bay Area, CA (Zone 9b)
Container Gardener Canning and food preservation Dog Lover
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Zuni
Dec 23, 2017 10:41 PM CST
jacfue said:I also heard that putting some coffee filter or screen mesh in the bottom of the pot helps with loss of soil but im afraid the water wont drain well. Implanning on using terra cotta pots btw.


One of the things I love about terra cotta pots, is that you can see the difference in color when the soil is moist. They also let the roots breathe. Learned this the hard way, of course.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Dec 24, 2017 11:31 AM CST
Jacob - Unless you are using a pot with a very large hole, soil running out of the drain hole is not really a problem, A bit may run through when you are initially potting and the soil is dry, but subsequently, a screen is not necessary.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Shea Rodriguez
Sutherlin, OR (Zone 8b)
Slow down!
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Servaline
Dec 30, 2017 7:15 PM CST
I agree with Will C, but I'm also a "rebel" of sorts as I plant aggressively growing plants in a large pot. I have a lot of people come to me with plant problems, and I'm no expert, but I always tell the potential plant killer that for the most part, less is more. Water kills more plants than no water. When people come to me with a plant that I can absolutely see was droughted and then flooded repeatedly, it's the plant owner that needs to be retrained to NOT overwater. My daughter-in-law wanted desperately to have plants and she was convinced she never could have a plant. I started her with a corn plant. It's HUGE and very impressive and she wanted another. I gave her a swiss-cheese philodendron and told her to water it like the corn plant. It's everywhere in her house. Then I gave her a cactus and she killed it. I gave her another and told her to water it like the corn plant, but even less. Her cactus are now blooming. I just gave her one of my blooming African violets and told her to water it like a corn plant. Success, it's been blooming since she got it. She's ecstatic! I tell people to drip the water right down the main stem of the plant and not worry about the rest of the pot, or if possible to take the plant to the kitchen sink and use the sprayer to water the top layer lightly and let it dribble down. Nature doesn't overcare plants and if they are in the throws of death they put forth new growth. A new plant person needs to not worry about how to save a plant, but learn from experience how to nurture a new plant.
The most beautiful thing we can experience in life is the Creator!
Name: Shea Rodriguez
Sutherlin, OR (Zone 8b)
Slow down!
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Servaline
Dec 30, 2017 7:29 PM CST
For repotting, I used to use large rocks to cover the hole(s) in the bottom of the pot, but now I tell people to just use a coffee filter(s) on the bottom and then put soil in. Man, I can't believe the amount of knowledge that's on this site and I can hardly wait for time to get back on and learn more. I wish I'd discovered this library a long time ago. For the past 2 months I've been navigating the site and reading and it's like what I perceive was wandering through the library at Alexandria back in the day.
The most beautiful thing we can experience in life is the Creator!
Greece (Zone 10b)
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Faridat
Jan 3, 2018 3:44 AM CST
Servaline said:For repotting, I used to use large rocks to cover the hole(s) in the bottom of the pot, but now I tell people to just use a coffee filter(s) on the bottom and then put soil in. Man, I can't believe the amount of knowledge that's on this site and I can hardly wait for time to get back on and learn more. I wish I'd discovered this library a long time ago. For the past 2 months I've been navigating the site and reading and it's like what I perceive was wandering through the library at Alexandria back in the day.


I couldn't agree more! Smiling Thumbs up
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