Bulbs forum: fantastic snowdrops (Galanthus) site & Kentucky region questions

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Name: UrbanWild
Kentucky (Zone 6b)
Kentucky - borderline of 6a & 6b
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UrbanWild
Dec 30, 2017 9:35 AM CST
First, Colesbourne Gardens looks fantastic!

https://www.colesbournegardens...

I found the site when researching EARLY pollen/nectar sources for bees. Would like to run a mix of snowdrops and winter aconites (Eranthis hyemalis) both in lawn and beds. Even though I see snowdrops offered as bulbs, everything I have been told here and elsewhere suggests they are iffy at best. Most say best planted in the green. However, the site above says there is root damage and they use bulbs. Some seed sources also exist. The ground I have in lawn is ancient alluvium baked and compressed to concrete during dry hot summer spells. Better during late winter into spring. The lot runs roughly east/west. Thoughts on snowdrops and/or aconites for my location? Best way to kickstart? Thoughts on species/varieties? Probably better would be the shorter types for the lawn.
Always looking for interesting plants for pollinators and food! Bonus points for highly, and pleasantly scented plants.

"Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, nihil deerit." [“If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”] -- Marcus Tullius Cicero in Ad Familiares IX, 4, to Varro. 46 BCE
[Last edited by UrbanWild - Dec 30, 2017 9:40 AM (+)]
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Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
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crawgarden
Dec 30, 2017 10:05 AM CST
Ive only planted snowdrop bulbs, never any issues. I've purchased my bulbs from this organization with great luck, website has a lot of good info. https://www.colorblends.com
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[Last edited by crawgarden - Dec 30, 2017 10:09 AM (+)]
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William
Dec 30, 2017 5:25 PM CST
Snowdrops starts to root early and are sensitive to drying out. This is probably the reason why it often is recommended to plant them in the green. If you buy bulbs early in the season from a reputable dealer that stores them properly and immediately plant them, then I agree that you should be good. Dried up bulbs late in the season have a much smaller chance for success.

My preference for snowdrops in my own garden is to lift them just as they start to yellow and immediately replant them.

I would personally get a few bulbs each of both N. nivalis and N. elwesii to start with. This will extend the bloom time and you will get a chance to see which one does best for you. Plant in a few different locations to see how they do. Once you are satisfied with their performance you can add more in those areas they do best. Planting a lot of bulbs at once can lead to big disappointments. On my dry sandy soil, they do better in the colder, moister areas. In the lawn, they grow very slowly, your experience may differ.

In all honesty there isn't such a great difference between snowdrops as some pictures will give you the impression of, so buying fancy cultivars isn't worth it for normal garden use. If you want to mass them and hopefully also get them to self seed then you want the species.

Winter aconites do not do so well here for several reasons, however if you plan to mix them with snowdrops, it might be better to plant them in groups, rather tan to do an actual mix if that was what you intended to do. That way you wont risk that one takes over too much. These bulbs directly compete about the same space and resources at the same time, so keep that in mind.
Name: UrbanWild
Kentucky (Zone 6b)
Kentucky - borderline of 6a & 6b
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Native Plants and Wildflowers Miniature Gardening Organic Gardener Frogs and Toads Dog Lover
Birds Vegetable Grower Spiders! Hummingbirder Butterflies Critters Allowed
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UrbanWild
Jan 2, 2018 10:35 AM CST
I did plant 60 Galanthus woronowii in 2 beds a couple of weeks ago. Crossing fingers on those.
As far as the lawn is concerned, given the recent deep freeze and its continuance for about another week, the ground is frozen and will continue to be well past the hope for the possibility of Spring other than planting for 2019. However, I am actively recording the answers and looking at sources & options for the above. Will look into those species. Thanks for all the recommendations.
Always looking for interesting plants for pollinators and food! Bonus points for highly, and pleasantly scented plants.

"Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, nihil deerit." [“If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”] -- Marcus Tullius Cicero in Ad Familiares IX, 4, to Varro. 46 BCE

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