Irises forum: Cinnamon against bacterial soft rot

Page 1 of 2 • 1 2
Views: 1020, Replies: 25 » Jump to the end
Sweden
Bulbs Lilies Bee Lover Irises Hellebores Deer
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Photo Contest Winner: 2016
Image
William
Dec 30, 2017 10:25 AM CST
Just scratching the surface of this yet and have not tried it myself, but I came across this info on a french iris forum, so just thought I should pass it along. I then got a link from there to an article about cactus culture, https://www.cactuspro.com/arti... (in french, scroll down some to see the part about cinnamon).

I've started to search a little about the subject and it seems cinnamon and cinnamon oil has gone through some scientific testing when it comes to potato tubers and soft rot.

Various methods of application from dusting the cuts with cinnamon, soaking tubers (rhizomes for us) in it, spraying foliage as a preventative, watering soil and so on. I don't think it works simply mixing cinnamon powder with water, but I could be wrong about that. The cactus article suggested using acetone as a solvent. Some of the scientific potato articles I've seen suggested ethanol.

As I said, I haven't tried this, but would love to find out more . Maybe someone has already tried this?
Name: Lilli
Copenhagen, Denmark, EU
Irises Roses Bulbs Hellebores Foliage Fan Cottage Gardener
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Seed Starter Winter Sowing Bee Lover Dog Lover Region: Europe
Image
IrisLilli
Dec 30, 2017 11:22 AM CST
Like all other types of bark, cinnamon contains anti-fungal substances and cinnamon on seedlings (never tried it with iris seedlings) that are prone to damping-off is a time-tested method and I have used it with success.

Cinnamon is also believed to have other beneficial effects on plants:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.c...
http://www.sun-gazing.com/spri...

Cinnamon and other spices on seedlings:
http://theadventurebite.com/da...
You don't know if it will grow until you try!
Name: Tom
Southern Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Irises Vegetable Grower Butterflies Region: Wisconsin Keeps Horses Cat Lover
Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Daylilies Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
tveguy3
Dec 30, 2017 12:52 PM CST
I was told by a fellow NGE member to sprinkle cinnamon on Dahlia bulbs to prevent rot, but I hadn't thought about it for irises.
I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion. - Alexander the Great
(Zone 9b)
Region: California
Image
UndertheSun
Dec 30, 2017 12:56 PM CST
That would make them smell good enough to eat! *Blush*
Name: Evelyn
Northern CA Sierra foothills - (Zone 8a)
Region: United States of America Region: California Annuals Bulbs Butterflies Cat Lover
Foliage Fan Irises Organic Gardener Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Vegetable Grower
Image
evelyninthegarden
Dec 30, 2017 1:12 PM CST
William and Lilli ~ Thank You! for sharing that information regarding cinnamon and other natural ingredients for their fungicidal properties. I have previously used it on growing seedlings in winter, but had not thought about using it for irises.

Another thing I have used on growing seedlings in the winter under lights is chamomile tea. I never thought to use it in the iris beds....

https://www.gardeningknowhow.c...
Name: Jan Wax
Mendocino County, N. CA (Zone 9a)
I'm a studio potter.
Hummingbirder Dog Lover Irises Region: California Organic Gardener Dahlias
Garden Art Cat Lover Vegetable Grower Birds Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
janwax
Dec 30, 2017 3:26 PM CST
I've filed this cinnamon info away in case of rot! Thanks.
VOTE!
Name: Arlyn
Whiteside County, Illinois (Zone 5a)
Irises Beekeeper Region: Illinois Celebrating Gardening: 2015
crowrita1
Dec 31, 2017 8:12 AM CST
Interesting information! Thanks for the links.
South central PA (Zone 6a)
Irises Region: Pennsylvania
Image
DaveinPA
Jan 3, 2018 6:30 PM CST
Interesting information, but maybe no ethanol on the rhizomes!
Sweden
Bulbs Lilies Bee Lover Irises Hellebores Deer
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Photo Contest Winner: 2016
Image
William
Jan 3, 2018 8:22 PM CST
In the very small concentrations we are talking about here, where you only use the ethanol as a solvent for the cinnamon and then dilutes this with water, I don't think it will be dangerous for the rhizomes. But when in doubt, always try it on a very small scale first. I wouldn't personally want to spray directly in strong sun either.

That said I'm still looking for a really good recipe for a spray. I'm concerned that the spray in the French link might have a too low cinnamon content in the prepared solution as compared to the more scientific papers, but on the other hand I use google translate on it, so might be something else that I misunderstand.

However I might have found a few more interesting recipes and in English this time. It seems cinnamon have some popularity among orchid growers: http://firstrays.com/free-info...

One of those recipes use rubbing alcohol and another uses hot water to make a spray.
I'm sort of inclined to try the rubbing alcohol one, but add some water to the mixture. Thoughts?

Another very interesting idea is the one to mix cinnamon powder with a casein-based glue (Elmer's) or cooking oil to make a thick paste.This would then have some water resistant properties, which certainly would be welcome in rainy weather.
Sweden
Bulbs Lilies Bee Lover Irises Hellebores Deer
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Photo Contest Winner: 2016
Image
William
Jan 6, 2018 11:00 AM CST
As the recipe in the above link is using rubbing alcohol, it seems proper to highlight that not all rubbing alcohols are the same.
Over here most seem to use ethanol, instead of the the isopropyl based that is assumed in the above recipe. One needs to check this carefully!

Using ethanol at full strength on plants probably isn't a great idea, although I have seen some sprays mentioned for plant use that have 20-30% ethanol in them, so this can still be worth exploring. Unfortunately I'm not able to post a link to the Pdf involved, but this was part of a trial to see if ethanol can be as beneficial to plants as methanol. Methanol sprays is supposed to increase yields on some plants, but of course methanol is toxic to humans so ethanol would be safer to use.

You can even water your plants with alcohol and provided you don't use to much it will be okay. It is supposed to give shorter stems on some forcing bulbs.

This is not really a link I ever anticipated posting, Rolling my eyes. but if you like to know more about the effect of alcohol on plants, you can read some here:
https://sciencing.com/effect-a...


Name: Lilli
Copenhagen, Denmark, EU
Irises Roses Bulbs Hellebores Foliage Fan Cottage Gardener
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Seed Starter Winter Sowing Bee Lover Dog Lover Region: Europe
Image
IrisLilli
Jan 6, 2018 1:11 PM CST
I just sprinkle the powdered cinnamon directly on top of the soil and never water the seedlings from the top - which is always a good idea with plants that are prone to dampening-off.
You don't know if it will grow until you try!
Name: Timothy
eastern oregon (Zone 7b)
Irises Bulbs Region: United States of America Region: Pacific Northwest Plant and/or Seed Trader Dahlias
Garden Photography Salvias Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers hot summers Hybridizer Region: Oregon
Image
TBMan
Jan 7, 2018 1:47 AM CST
...... the active component of cinnamon, which has the main fungicidal action is the phenylpropene compound, Eugenol, plus the co-activity of a number of other essential oils in much smaller concentrations. Cinnamon is a member of the Lauraceae family, many members of which have the same compound plus numerous other essential aromatic components.

Cinnamomum: cinnamon, cassia and camphor laurel
Laurus: bay laurel
Persea: avocado

Also the Myrtle family contains the same bio compounds of which Clove is a member of.
There are already a number of products on the market that utilize Eugenol as a insecticide, miticide, and acaricide, and it shows some bio activity towards certain pathogenic fungi
some more info here:
https://www.naturepest.com/clo...
Name: daphne
san diego county, ca (Zone 10a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
shizen
Jan 7, 2018 2:56 AM CST
thank you for that article, timothy. makes a lot of sense. i remember the dentist packing a clove scented gauze, and we used cinnamon in the kitchen where i worked, to discourage ants in the microwave. only problem was that we couldn't get some of that brn/reddish stain (leftover powder) in the seams of (edited to correct typo) the microwave oven.
[Last edited by shizen - Jan 7, 2018 4:31 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1615735 (13)
Sweden
Bulbs Lilies Bee Lover Irises Hellebores Deer
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Photo Contest Winner: 2016
Image
William
Jan 7, 2018 4:40 AM CST
Excellent info about about the Eugenol, Timothy. It will make it much easier to search for more info on the subject as well.

I especially noted the efficiency against Botrytis cinerea, which I found very interesting. Botrytis is big problems for my lilies, so would be worth trying this to see if it was better than the baking soda spray I currently use or perhaps one can even combine the two or alternate between them.

Now if Eugenol could prove to be efficient on iris leaf spot as well, that would have been awesome.

Edit: spelling

[Last edited by William - Jan 7, 2018 8:10 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1615755 (14)
Name: Lilli
Copenhagen, Denmark, EU
Irises Roses Bulbs Hellebores Foliage Fan Cottage Gardener
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Seed Starter Winter Sowing Bee Lover Dog Lover Region: Europe
Image
IrisLilli
Jan 7, 2018 4:49 AM CST
Thank You! Timothy! I tip my hat to you.
You don't know if it will grow until you try!
Name: Evelyn
Northern CA Sierra foothills - (Zone 8a)
Region: United States of America Region: California Annuals Bulbs Butterflies Cat Lover
Foliage Fan Irises Organic Gardener Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Vegetable Grower
Image
evelyninthegarden
Jan 7, 2018 3:56 PM CST
IrisLilli said: Thank You! Timothy! I tip my hat to you.

I agree Thank You!
Name: Barbara
Northern CA (Zone 9a)
Region: California Cat Lover Irises Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover
Image
iciris
Jan 7, 2018 8:33 PM CST
Another Thank You! from me too!
• “Whoever said, ‘Do something right and you won’t have to do it again’ never weeded a garden.” – Anonymous
Sweden
Bulbs Lilies Bee Lover Irises Hellebores Deer
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Photo Contest Winner: 2016
Image
William
Apr 27, 2018 3:53 PM CST
Some experimenting.

I let a tablespoon of cinnamon soak in 3 tablespoons of 85% rubbing alcohol for several days. This was mostly ethanol but also had a small amount of isopropyl alcohol in it. I filtered it and added a tablespoon of this mixture to a liter of water, added a teaspoon of baking soda and 1/2 teaspoon of dish washing liquid(to help the spray wet the waxy foliage better) and 1/2 teaspoon of liquid soap.

I sprayed this solution on Maui Moonlight, Ask Alma, Seraphita, 3 smaller rhizomes of Dangerous Mood and 3 rhizomes of Red zinger(near my boiler room entrance). I also tried this on the lily Robina and my most easterly plantings of the lily Whistler. I will be checking these for any bad reactions before proceeding any further.

My hope is then that this will be somewhat preventive to leaf spot on irises and Botrytis cinerea on lilies and also of course work preventative against bacterial soft rot. Baking soda has some effect on Botrytis cinerea on lilies and is supposed to help with leaf spot on irises, but I'm uncertain of what dose to use for irises. More baking soda should have better effect, but can also burn leaves.

To mix cinnamon and baking soda together is rather experimental and I do not know what the effect will be, so nothing I recommend, just want to inform anyone interested that I'm testing it.

[Last edited by William - Apr 27, 2018 3:54 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1694410 (18)
Name: daphne
san diego county, ca (Zone 10a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
shizen
Apr 27, 2018 4:46 PM CST
interested in your results, william.

have you tried ground cinnamon sprinkled directly on the rhizomes? iif anyone else has, i would be interested in learning of the results.
Sweden
Bulbs Lilies Bee Lover Irises Hellebores Deer
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Photo Contest Winner: 2016
Image
William
Apr 27, 2018 6:00 PM CST
Yes, I have tried sprinkling cinnamon directly on the rhizomes, Smiling but I have no real opinion if it is effective or not, as I only done it a few times and it was not very serious, as I still relied on bleach to sanitize the rhizomes. Based on what I read about rot preventing in potatoes I'm thinking one would probably need to apply cinnamon before rot becomes an issue, as a preventive measure. I don't believe it is a cure. Without intentionally attempting to infect rhizomes, and having a control group, it would also be very difficult to properly measure effectiveness, but infecting rhizomes on purpose is not for me!

Page 1 of 2 • 1 2

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Irises forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by rocklady and is called "NOID Daylily"