Plant ID forum: Leaf ID for tree ID

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North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Dec 31, 2017 3:31 AM CST
I posted this the other day but it appears there was a broken link or something. So here goes. I'm trying to ID leaves that I think belong to a tree that I would love to ID. I'm hoping the leaves didn't blow in from somewhere else. So here are 2 pictures of the leaves.

Thumb of 2017-12-31/tx_flower_child/8e4cdc


Thumb of 2017-12-31/tx_flower_child/b553b3

Here's a picture of the tree taken at dusk. I love the way the branches appear to loop.


Thumb of 2017-12-31/tx_flower_child/22378d

I was able to get closer to get a picture of the bark. You'll need to enlarge it to see. Note that the leaves in the background are from a different tree.

Thumb of 2017-12-31/tx_flower_child/879462

Thanks for any help.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
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porkpal
Dec 31, 2017 8:16 AM CST
Sycamore? What does the bark look like?
Porkpal
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
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dyzzypyxxy
Dec 31, 2017 8:53 AM CST
The bark of the tree in your last picture looks like a live oak, but that's certainly not what your leaves came from. As you said, those leaves may have blown from somewhere else.

I'm thinking you might want to pursue this mystery in the springtime after the trees have all leafed out again. Then you can be sure that the leaves in question did come from the tree in the two pictures.

In other words, you can see the tree that you like with it's leaves on it. That will help a lot to ID it too. If it flowers or produces seeds that will also be helpful.
Elaine

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Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Dec 31, 2017 9:34 AM CST
The leaves look a lot like Sycamore. I have Sycamore leaves blow into my yard from somewhere else; the leaves must fly pretty far on the wind.

Look under trees in the area for the seed balls/fruit on the ground.


If the seed balls/fruit are still hanging from the tree they would look like this:
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Dec 31, 2017 11:09 AM CST
It looks like a Sycamore.
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North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Dec 31, 2017 1:25 PM CST
Edited because I hit 'finish' too quickly. Sorry.
[Last edited by tx_flower_child - Dec 31, 2017 1:37 PM (+)]
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North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Dec 31, 2017 1:34 PM CST
Thanks y'all. I agree that the leaves are probably from a sycamore. The 2nd picture of the tree was as close as I could get without freezing my, um, fingers.

So we'll wait until spring. I'm thinking that I never noticed the 'loop the loop' of the branches because it might have been hidden by the leaves and also because (as we say in Texas) I never paid it no never mind.

The nice thing about finding Fall Interest and Winter Interest pictures is that it's making me pay more attention to my surroundings.

Can't recall if I've seen any of the 'fruit' in the area. I have seen the 'tennis balls' from a Bois d'Arc tree both in my yard and in the alley. Fortunately if the squirrels are tossing any of those, they've missed me so far.

Thanks again for your help.
Happy New Year, y'all!
Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

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plantladylin
Dec 31, 2017 9:56 PM CST
Reminds me of Sycamore leaves also:
Thumb of 2018-01-01/plantladylin/84c649 Thumb of 2018-01-01/plantladylin/d59e4b
Thumb of 2018-01-01/plantladylin/479a8e







~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Jan 1, 2018 1:31 AM CST
Yep. Me too. I didn't want to contribute any bias by offering that. The real problem is that although the leaves are probably from a Sycamore, I can't be sure that the leaves came off the tree in question. Even if I could get over the fence to look at leaves on the other side, there are too many trees and it's been too windy. But now I know what to look for in the spring or summer — those little dingleberry things as well as the leaves. My neighbor said it was a maple but he'd just had a heart attack and I question his judgement. (Oh, slap me.) Also, it hadn't occurred to me before that there's a Bois d'Arc (Maclura pomifera) tree nearby. It should have because I always see the 'fruit' on my side of the fence as well as in the alley.

Was it you that posted a picture of a Osage orange (Maclura pomifera) tree? I know that I saw one recently.

Just for grins, here's another naked tree. It's across the alley, directly behind my house. Had beautiful leaves that resemble leaves of my Chinese Pistache trees. The couple who live in that house might actually know what the tree is but I haven't had a chance to do a backyard chat.


Thumb of 2018-01-01/tx_flower_child/2641c4

Too bad that I've taken pictures around dusk. Doesn't help.

So anyway, I appreciate your input. I will pay more attention later this year!
BTW — That's a beautiful Sycamore tree. Yours?
[Last edited by tx_flower_child - Jan 1, 2018 1:32 AM (+)]
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Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Jan 1, 2018 12:20 PM CST
Not my tree .... they were in a yard in our old neighborhood, the big ones across the water, showing October color.
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Jan 14, 2018 12:20 AM CST
Bingo! I got a positive ID of the tree. It's a Maclura pomifera, commonly known as a Bois d'Arc or as an Osage orange. I knew there was one nearby since I've seen a 'few' of the horse apples (fruit) around.

Turns out that the tree has spines or thorns. I pointed to the tree the other day when the 'kid' who helps me with yard work was over. He recognized it immediately because of the spines. Said he'd had to work on one once and I guess it was quite memorable.

https://www.dirtdoctor.com/gar...

Now I may have to wait until spring to find out which of the trees is the Sycamore. I think we all agreed that the leaves I took the picture of were from a Sycamore.
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Jan 14, 2018 11:47 AM CST
You have a positive ID of a Maclura pomifera after posting photos of a Sycamore leaf.
You are truly blessed. Don't know how it happened but I wish you good luck in the spring as you hunt for which tree is the Sycamore. Thumbs up Rolling on the floor laughing Hurray!
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
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Frillylily
Jan 14, 2018 11:58 AM CST
The leaf you posted is NOT an osage orange. The fruits of osage orange are really large, like a baseball/softball size. The balls a sycamore makes are smaller like a golf ball size.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Jan 14, 2018 12:51 PM CST
I think there is some confusion due to the fact that there are two different trees under discussion. I believe the leaf was positively identified as Sycamore and the tree pictured, which is not a Sycamore, is being called an Osage Orange.
Porkpal
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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tx_flower_child
Jan 14, 2018 1:04 PM CST
Exactly. I was originally trying to identify the tree but the only clue I had were some leaves. We all decided that the leaves are from a Sycamore. Problem was that the leaves that I found might have been blown from somewhere else. There are a lot of trees that grow along both sides of my alley. But now I know the tree in question is the Osage orange and that the Sycamore leaves definitely blew in from some other tree.
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Jan 14, 2018 1:11 PM CST
BTW -- for those of you that are curious and didn't read through the link I attached, you might want to read it. It tells where the names Osage orange and Bois d'arc came from. And for further nerdy factoids, the article ends with a theory about horse apples being insect repellents.
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Jan 14, 2018 6:35 PM CST
@Frillylily, I had read the post where the ID was Osage Orange and if I had not kept reading to the end of the post, I would have missed this part...
tx_flower_child said:
Now I may have to wait until spring to find out which of the trees is the Sycamore. I think we all agreed that the leaves I took the picture of were from a Sycamore.


Hope the location of the Sycamore is discovered soon. Thumbs up



Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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tx_flower_child
Jan 15, 2018 12:32 AM CST
I don't think we'll know the location of the Sycamore until the leaves branch out in the spring. But when would that be, you might ask. The answer, of course, is no one knows. We don't go by the regular solar/lunar calendar round these parts. Here we are in mid-January and the leaves are pretty much off my oaks. A few stragglers here and there. And just the same as last year, the goldfinches have arrived about 6 weeks or more later than 'normal'.

I am so used to calling the Maclura pomifera tree by the name Bois d'Arc tree. Wasn't familiar with the term Osage orange. After reading through the link it all makes sense. Tree is native to the Red River which borders Texas and Oklahoma, and goes down to the Trinity River. That's where I am. So at one time the Osage Indians used the orange tinted wood for a number of things. Apparently it's very hard wood and they made bows (as in bows and arrows) out of it. I've seen the spelling Bowdark. That's more how it would look if it weren't in French. Also rumor has it that the sharp spines on the branches were the inspiration for barbed wire.

I do hope that the scientists successfully find that the green fruit of the tree does have a use in repelling roaches and fleas.
[Last edited by tx_flower_child - Jan 15, 2018 12:40 AM (+)]
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springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
Jan 15, 2018 9:20 AM CST
sycamore trees have a white coloring on the bark? they are white colored. Unless I am thinking of something else.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Jan 15, 2018 10:59 AM CST
Yes, a Sycamore could probably be identified by its bark.
Porkpal

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