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Avatar for Sukiro
Jan 2, 2018 12:31 PM CST
Miami, FL (Zone 10b)
Thanks in advance for any help. I'm very new to gardening and I have been trying to improve my garden in my new house by adding plants and removing any weed or unwanted ones.

While removing some of those weeds I came across these growing ones and was wondering if anyone had an idea what they are and the names.

Thanks again!

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Jan 2, 2018 12:53 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Welcome!

Let me see....

1. Lamb's Quarters (but those petioles are throwing me off) and Chickweed - both considered weeds
2. That looks like a Dahlia - a keeper if it is
3. Hmmm... odd petioles
4. Don't know but it doesn't look like a weed.

Someone will be along in a minute to correct me. Smiling
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
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Jan 3, 2018 4:30 PM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
#1 looks like Emilia fosbergii



@DaisyI I thought we'd all agreed to stop using the "w" word....

#2 kinda resembles bidens...

#3 emilia again... if not emelia, maybe a wild letuce or some variety of false dandy lion.

#4 some kind of salvia or ruellia?
Last edited by stone Jan 3, 2018 4:38 PM Icon for preview
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Jan 3, 2018 5:31 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
@Stone, you agreed. I am still using WEED as a descriptive of plants I find annoying. Smiling
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Avatar for porkpal
Jan 3, 2018 5:59 PM CST
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX (Zone 9a)
Cat Lover Charter ATP Member Keeper of Poultry I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Dog Lover Keeps Horses
Roses Plant Identifier Farmer Raises cows Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Ideas: Level 2
So from now on it is to be called chickplant, pokeplant, locoplant, etc?
Porkpal
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Jan 3, 2018 7:01 PM CST
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Region: Ukraine Region: Florida Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener Houseplants
#1 & #3 remind me of Emilia also. The two I know of, found here in Florida:
Florida Tassel Flower (Emilia fosbergii)
Lilac Tasselflower (Emilia sonchifolia)
More photos can be viewed on these pages:
http://florida.plantatlas.usf....
http://florida.plantatlas.usf....

#2 & #4 remind me of Spanish Needles (Bidens pilosa)
More Bidens photos on these pages for comparison:
http://florida.plantatlas.usf....
https://www.bing.com/images/se...
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


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Jan 4, 2018 10:32 AM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
Thumb of 2018-01-04/stone/dbbf1a

Thumb of 2018-01-04/stone/2f17b8

Chickweed (stellaria media), is valuable as a butterfly nectar plant, and the songbirds like it too.... Not a weed.

Found the thread about not using the "w" word:
The thread "Two suggestions when ID-ing plants" in Plant ID forum
Last edited by stone Jan 4, 2018 10:37 AM Icon for preview
Avatar for Sukiro
Jan 4, 2018 4:52 PM CST
Miami, FL (Zone 10b)
DaisyI said: Welcome!


Thank you for the welcome and for your fast reply! Lovey dubby


Also thanks everyone for your input. Great information and now I have an idea. I'm keeping them then since it seems that some are good bees and butterflies attractors. Going to have to relocate them though. That's not the main garden but more of very small zen type of garden or used to be one in this house hence the river stones on the pictures. The bigger garden area is in the back and they will have more space to grow too. Coincidentally I'm aiming for a butterfly garden, in fact I got a few bicapsularis cassia on the way which are good for my zone and they don't grow too big since they are more for bushes than a tree. They can look amazing as a small tree though and going for that. The fact that these plants are butterflies/bees friendly I'm happy about it.

Thank you Daisyl, Stone and Plantladylin. Thank You! Good to learn with you guys. I tip my hat to you.
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Jan 4, 2018 5:17 PM CST
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Region: Ukraine Region: Florida Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener Houseplants
You will love the Christmas Senna (Senna bicapsularis) - synonym Cassia bicapsularis. I had one in the backyard at our old house and it was so beautiful when in full bloom! An elderly neighbor gave me cuttings a few times and I could not get them to take root for the life of me! She would prune her main plant back and stick the cuttings right in the ground beneath the mama plant and they'd grow like crazy so one time we were chatting over the fence and she yanked one up and gave it to me and I immediately planted it in the yard. It grew to about 8 feet in height and was so so pretty, blooming from October through December some years! My shrub was eventually killed by consecutive freezes up here in the Daytona Beach area.

~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Avatar for Sukiro
Jan 4, 2018 6:14 PM CST
Miami, FL (Zone 10b)
plantladylin said:You will love the Christmas Senna (Senna bicapsularis) - synonym Cassia bicapsularis. I had one in the backyard at our old house and it was so beautiful when in full bloom! An elderly neighbor gave me cuttings a few times and I could not get them to take root for the life of me! She would prune her main plant back and stick the cuttings right in the ground beneath the mama plant and they'd grow like crazy so one time we were chatting over the fence and she yanked one up and gave it to me and I immediately planted it in the yard. It grew to about 8 feet in height and was so so pretty, blooming from October through December some years! My shrub was eventually killed by consecutive freezes up here in the Daytona Beach area.



Awww I'm so sorry Crying . It's sad to see something beautiful end after so much hard work to make it happen. That was a beauty if that's the one you are talking about in your pic. It's really a unfortunate event. Have you ever tried to get another one? Not sure how common are on your are abut on my area it seems like nobody is interested or care about it. I couldn't find them on any local nursery but I found a few online. Lets hope they arrive in good shape and hopefully I get the lucky first timer green thumb and I'm able to see it grow successfully. Crossing Fingers!
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Jan 4, 2018 6:54 PM CST
Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier Garden Ideas: Level 1
FWIW

Introduction to Weeds: What are Weeds and Why do we Care?

No matter what definition is used, weeds are plants whose undesirable qualities outweigh their good points.

Introduction to Weeds: What are Weeds and Why do we Care? - Articles ARTICLESUPDATED: AUGUST 8, 2017
Introduction to Weeds: What are Weeds and Why do we Care?
Prepared by Dwight D. Ligenfelter, Extension Agronomist,
Department of Agronomy, Penn State University

Description of a Weed

There are numerous definitions of a weed, including:

a plant out of place and not intentionally sown
a plant growing where it is not wanted
a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered. (R.W.Emerson)
plants that are competitive, persistent, pernicious, and interfere negatively with human activity (Ross, et. al.)
and many others
No matter what definition is used, weeds are plants whose undesirable qualities outweigh their good points, according to man. Our human activities create weed problems since no plant is a "weed" in nature. Though we may try to manipulate nature for our own good, nature is persistent. Through the manipulation process, certain weeds are controlled, while, other more serious weeds may thrive because favorable growing conditions for them also have been meet. Weeds are naturally strong competitors and those weeds that can best compete always tend to dominate. Both humans and nature are involved in plant breeding programs. The main difference between the two programs is that man breeds plants for yield, while nature breeds plants for survival.
Characteristics of weeds

Certain characteristics are associated with and allow the survival of weeds. Weeds posses one or more of the following:

a) abundant seed production;
b) rapid population establishment;
c) seed dormancy;
d) long-term survival of buried seed;
e) adaptation for spread;
f) presence of vegetative reproductive structures; and
g) ability to occupy sites disturbed by human activities.

There are approximately 250,000 species of plants worldwide; of those, about 3% or 8000 species behave as weeds.

Weeds are troublesome in many ways. Primarily, they reduce crop yield by competing for water, light, soil nutrients, and space. Other problems associated with weeds in agriculture include:

a) reduced crop quality by contaminating the commodity;
b) interference with harvest;
c) serve as hosts for crop diseases or provide shelter for insects to
overwinter;
d) limit the choice of crop rotation sequences and cultural
practices; and
e) production of chemical substances which are toxic to crop plants
(allelopathy), animals, or humans.

Costs of weeds

Weeds are common on all 485 million acres of U.S. cropland and almost one billion acres of range and pasture. Since weeds are so common, people generally do not understand their economic impact on crop losses and control costs. In 1991, the estimated average annual monetary loss caused by weeds with current control strategies in the 46 crops grown in the United States was $4.1 billion. If herbicides were not used, this loss was estimated to be $19.6 billion. Losses in field crops accounted for 82% of this total (Bridges; WSSA, 1992).

Another source estimates that U.S. farmers annually spend $3.6 billion on chemical weed control and $2.6 billion for cultural and other methods of control. The total cost of weeds in the United States could approach $15 to $20 billion dollars (Ashton and Monaco, 1991). Also, weed control and other input costs (e.g., seed, fertilizer, other pesticides, fuel) vary with the crop. For example, in the mid-90s, herbicides for soybeans cost $30/acre or about 47% of the $63/acre in total purchased input. For corn, the cost was $32/acre or about 28% of the $114/acre in total purchased input. And for wheat it was $6 or about 6% of the total $96/acre inputs. Several factors help determine the relative costs of herbicides from one crop to another and include the competitive ability of the crop, the weeds present, the contribution of non-chemical control practices, the tillage method, management decisions, and the value of the crop. (Ross and Lembi, 1999)

Benefits of weeds

Despite the negative impacts of weeds, some plants usually thought of as weeds may actually provide some benefits. Some attributes include:

soil stabilization;
habitat and feed for wildlife,
nectar for bees;
aesthetic qualities;
add organic matter;
provide genetic reservoir;
human consumption; and
provide employment opportunities.
Weeds have a controversial nature. But to the agriculturist, they are plants that need to be controlled, in an economical and practical way, in order to produce food, feed, and fiber for humans and animals. In this context, the negative impacts of weeds indirectly affect all living beings.
As Yogi Berra said, “It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future.”
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Jan 4, 2018 9:59 PM CST
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Region: Ukraine Region: Florida Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener Houseplants
Sukiro, I very rarely see Senna bicapsularis for sale in this part of Florida, probably due to the fact that they are short-lived if/when we have hard freezes. They should do very well for you since you are in the southern part of the state!
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Avatar for Sukiro
Mar 4, 2019 5:01 PM CST
Miami, FL (Zone 10b)
plantladylin said:Sukiro, I very rarely see Senna bicapsularis for sale in this part of Florida, probably due to the fact that they are short-lived if/when we have hard freezes. They should do very well for you since you are in the southern part of the state!


I know I'm months late so sorry. Had a baby and things got complicated real fast. Was battling morning sickness and all sort of pains. I was able to buy a few and also clone them. They grow up pretty fast! Trying to make it a tree instead of letting it grow like a shrub. So far they are turning wonderful but they are taking a bit of time. You were right! Thanks again.
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Mar 4, 2019 7:47 PM CST
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Region: Ukraine Region: Florida Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener Houseplants
You are very welcome! Sorry about your pregnancy complications but Congratulations on the new baby! Lovey dubby
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Avatar for Sukiro
Mar 4, 2019 10:25 PM CST
Miami, FL (Zone 10b)
plantladylin said:You are very welcome! Sorry about your pregnancy complications but Congratulations on the new baby! Lovey dubby


Thank you! It was worth it. Lovey dubby Can't complain. Specially because he came out a healthy baby. Smiling
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