Cactus and Tender Succulents forum: Propagating Euphorbia trigona

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Greece (Zone 10b)
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Faridat
Jan 3, 2018 2:53 AM CST
I have two stem parts from an Euphorbia in perlite right now. They were donated to me. The person who had them in his home had them in water for many weeks, but they had not rooted. Is there anything I can do to help them root? I did let them callus. How often must I spray the perlite? I'm afraid of rotting these, I'd really love to keep this plant! Also, where should I place them, in light, sun, shade, as I wait for them to root?
In some Native languages the term for plants translates to "those who take care of us."
Robin Wall Kimmerer
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Jan 3, 2018 10:41 AM CST

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E. trigona goes through periods of active growth and rest, and may not root right away. Definitely avoid rooting in water (only) though, because of the risk of rot. You can water the perlite deeply and regularly as long as it doesn't stay wet all the time. You want bright light but not a lot of direct overhead sun. This time of year it's way harder to sunburn these plants. The way you know you were successful is when you see new leaves on top.

I personally would put them in regular soil (for me that's 50% pumice) in a pot that's relatively small and wider than deep, and then water like my other succulents (when the soil is going dry). Last I rooted some of these I just kind of forgot about them under 50% shade for about a year and they were growing when I checked again. Sometimes the best solution is to find a distraction and do something else for a while. Smiling
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Jan 3, 2018 1:19 PM (+)]
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Greece (Zone 10b)
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Faridat
Jan 3, 2018 3:48 PM CST
So, @Baja_Costero, do you suggest I remove them from the perlite and root them in regular soil, like the one you use? That perlite they are in now, is so difficult to keep them standing in there, I have put some stakes to support each one, but I'd rather use another media.
And thank you for your help! Smiling
In some Native languages the term for plants translates to "those who take care of us."
Robin Wall Kimmerer
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Jan 3, 2018 4:08 PM CST

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Yes, if it's easier for you, move them to some soil. You can position rocks on each side of the stems to help hold them up, just be sure those rocks do not obstruct the normal evaporation of the soil (which is the only way it will lose water until the plant has roots). Ideally water well when the soil is dry from there on out, and look for leaves to indicate they are rooted.

You might still need to use stakes. The most important thing is to find a place where the pots are least likely to be bumped or disturbed, and then you don't need to do as much to fight gravity. Smiling
Name: Daisy I
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DaisyI
Jan 3, 2018 5:42 PM CST
Baja's regular potting soil is 50% pumice so whatever potting soil you use, mix it 1/2 perlite and 1/2 potting soil.
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Greece (Zone 10b)
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Faridat
Jan 3, 2018 11:59 PM CST
Thank you also for your advice @Daisyl! :)
In some Native languages the term for plants translates to "those who take care of us."
Robin Wall Kimmerer
[Last edited by Faridat - Jan 4, 2018 12:00 AM (+)]
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Name: 'CareBear'

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Stush2019
Jan 5, 2018 9:13 AM CST
Like Baja said, plant it and forget about it for a while. They can hold water inside for a long time and no need to worry about watering them until you see new growth. I have no trouble rooting E. trigona or it's close cousin E. latea. But some are very hard and easy to rot. I had one in pure grit for almost a year before it started to root. I had lost two previously planted in any other soil. Bob Smoley gave me a note how to root this one. Bob is passed now but his wife takes over the nursery.
This is a cutting when I first got it.
Thumb of 2018-01-05/Stush2019/64ff18

Here it is now. Over 3 feet tall.
Thumb of 2018-01-05/Stush2019/9fcf36

Here's my E. latea also from a small cutting.
Thumb of 2018-01-05/Stush2019/9c9a06

Here's the one that gave me so much trouble. Now it's doing great.
Thumb of 2018-01-05/Stush2019/cde884

Greece (Zone 10b)
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Faridat
Jan 5, 2018 10:00 AM CST
@Stush2019, thank you very much! These photos gave me hope that perhaps I can make it. I have to be very patient and find a place where they won't be disturbed. Smiling
In some Native languages the term for plants translates to "those who take care of us."
Robin Wall Kimmerer
Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Mar 30, 2018 12:38 PM CST
What's going on by now?

My tiny cutting bloomed, grew a few leaves, got forgotten outside in a light frost, defoliated & now has a couple new leaves. Oops, it's been through a lot!
Thumb of 2018-03-30/purpleinopp/9bace0
Thumb of 2018-03-30/purpleinopp/da741f

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Name: 'CareBear'

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Stush2019
Mar 31, 2018 8:17 AM CST
Looks like a Crown of Thorns? Does it have the tiny flowers or is it a hybrid with the larger quarter size flowers?
Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Mar 31, 2018 8:33 AM CST
Yes, tiny flowers. Straight species E. milii, I assume.
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Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
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skopjecollection
Mar 31, 2018 9:55 AM CST
Ive tried propagating a pseudoglobosa. Still no roots(3 weeks have passed). Have i done something wrong?
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Name: Baja
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Baja_Costero
Mar 31, 2018 1:06 PM CST

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I would advise patience. 3 weeks may be a bit too soon to expect results. Provide strong light and water the soil when it is going dry... as long as the cutting is mostly sitting on top of the soil and not particularly buried, there's little risk of things going wrong. Maybe after 3 months you might wonder more seriously if it's going to happen, but I tend to keep my cuttings until they are actually visibly dead before I give up on them. Smiling I have seen some amazing unexpected comebacks.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Mar 31, 2018 1:11 PM (+)]
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Name: Stefan
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skopjecollection
Mar 31, 2018 1:13 PM CST
hmmn.... i thought the procedure was not to water it that much and keep it in partial shade.
I know that pseudoglobosa is under the "dry durable" euphorbias, that can stand dryness for long periods. Maybe its because i broke it off instead of cutting off the mother plant(by accident).
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[Last edited by skopjecollection - Mar 31, 2018 1:16 PM (+)]
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Name: Baja
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Baja_Costero
Mar 31, 2018 1:24 PM CST

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Whatever works, of course. Smiling I water my Euphorbia cuttings just like my other cuttings, when the soil is going dry. I think a bit of moisture in the soil helps encourage the roots to grow out. If anything, I probably underwater. If you start with a relatively wide pot (wider than deep, not a whole lot bigger than the cutting) then it will dry out pretty fast. Some plants are seasonal and they may wait until their active growth season to begin rooting, in which case you would time the use of the knife to the start of their season rather than cutting pieces sooner and having them sit for a long time on dry soil.

As for light, it depends if these are inside a house/greenhouse or in the open air. A sunny windowsill (hours of daily sun) is good if it's indoors, bright shade or filtered light is better if it's outdoors. There is no reason to avoid indoor sun or greenhouse/glasshouse sun (both are filtered light). Indoor sun lacks most of the harmful UV rays of outdoor sun.

I start my Euphorbia cuttings outdoors on the NE side of our house under an overhang (the eaves of the house). In that spot they may get some morning sun for part of the year, but nothing after late morning ever. Lots and lots of reflected ambient light from the adjacent full sun area, though. (The light reaches about 20% the intensity of direct sun in that location, when I measured. So it's much brighter than deep shade.) They also root well under 50% shade. You do want to try to avoid direct (outdoor) sun especially in the middle of the day (overhead rays are intense) especially during spring and summer.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Mar 31, 2018 1:40 PM (+)]
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Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
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skopjecollection
Mar 31, 2018 1:37 PM CST
Its spring , and im the temperate belt... so should I move it to a slightly brighter location until it makes roots?
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Mar 31, 2018 1:40 PM CST

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Where is it now?
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
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skopjecollection
Mar 31, 2018 1:44 PM CST
In a pot with a deep edge, beside a tirucalii cutting, in the back of the table they are placed on. Pretty sure the tiucalli hasnt root as well, but too much of a hassle to dig it out. Window is south-west facing. Enopla, heptagona? and milli have shown regular growth, so i assume light levels are opitumum. I can only assume that the only one looking etiolated (the obesa hybrid) is due to its growth cycle.
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[Last edited by skopjecollection - Mar 31, 2018 1:47 PM (+)]
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Name: Baja
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Baja_Costero
Mar 31, 2018 2:02 PM CST

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Your southwest facing window should be ideal for cuttings and rooted plants. Just put the rooted plants closer to the glass if you have the choice.

Here is an example of a Euphorbia cutting which got too much sun early on... some of them will let you know by turning colors, usually yellow or brown. It's actually way better looking now than a couple of weeks ago. It started out totally green in bright shade. The color then became totally brown in the sun. Now there's a little red in it, and new tiny red leaves, so it's turned the corner. Thumbs up The red is normal sun stress (you can see that on the adult plants), the brown is specific to the rootless cutting getting shocked in more than one way.

I probably should have avoided that exposed location (hours of midday sun) in favor of my usual protected spot, but I've seen those plants turn brown before and everything worked out fine. Smiling

Thumb of 2018-03-31/Baja_Costero/c24fe6

Thumb of 2018-03-31/Baja_Costero/b3681c Thumb of 2018-03-31/Baja_Costero/e9c0eb
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Mar 31, 2018 2:04 PM (+)]
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Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
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skopjecollection
Mar 31, 2018 2:08 PM CST
Im not really debating about the rest, rather the exposure of the euphorbia pseudoglobosa cutting in question. If I had another location to place them, id have done so. Do you have a pseudoglobosa perchance ?
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[Last edited by skopjecollection - Mar 31, 2018 2:11 PM (+)]
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