Ask a Question forum: Jade Plants Dying

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New York City
SQGlue92
Jan 5, 2018 6:51 PM CST
I had a 10ish year old jade plant that was accidentally knocked over and suffered some damage. I decided to split it up into several smaller sections and plant them individually (it was probably time to do some pruning anyway).

Now all of the pieces are slowly dying. I'm down to about 5 healthy looking stalks from about 15. They vary in size from 4 or 5 inches to just 1" with a couple of leaves. I have them planted in a succulent soil which was damp when I planted them but I have since let it dry out and keep it just ever so slightly damp.

I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong or why they keep dying - everything I have read makes it sound like they take pretty easily and I've always had good luck with the big parent plant.

Any advice on what my best steps are to save whats left would be much appreciated.
Should I have them under a grow lamp? (Its currently Winter here so sunlight isn't particularly plentiful!)
Should I be misting them?

Thanks for any help folks can offer!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jan 5, 2018 8:02 PM CST
Welcome!

I'm confused about what you mean by "splitting". Did you actually cut the plant apart? Did you allow the cut sides to 'scab' over for a week or so before you replanted? Did the pieces have roots? Maybe some photos would help.

Winter is NOT the time to do anything with cactus or succulents.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Jan 5, 2018 8:42 PM CST
Is your concern the "pieces" or also the original plant? Can you post some photos so we have a better idea what is happening? I, too, am confused.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
New York City
SQGlue92
Jan 7, 2018 12:53 AM CST
Apologies for the confusion! I know succulents prefer not to be messed with during the winter but I didnt really have a choice. Is there a way for me to convince them its summer?

I potted both individual leaves & some small cuttings that broke off the original plant - nothing that already had roots.

The individual leaves I planted directly, the cuttings I clipped the ends clean about an 1/8" above where the break was and planted them. I did not leave time for them to scab.

Attached are some pictures. A few of them appear to be doing alright although I have no idea how they look under the soil (obviously). A couple appear wilted or wrinkly and a couple look much darker than normal.

Also, a bit more info, a couple of the stalks started to turn black (think the soil might have been a bit too damp when I originally planted them) so I trimmed off the black sections. That was a few days ago and I am letting them scab over now before I plant them.

Thanks, any additional advice would be very much appreciated. This p[articular plant is very special to me so if I can save any of it, that would be really great!
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jan 7, 2018 1:12 AM CST
Here are a couple suggestions:

Don't 'clip' the stems, use a very sharp knife. Cut until the center of the stem is green (brown is an indication of rot). Clean your knife between cuts with alcohol so you don't spread any rot to healthy parts of the cuttings.

Yes, let them scab over before planting them. The soil should be barely damp and very porous (I use half perlite and half cactus soil). Plants with no roots can't use the moisture - its just a means to rot. The leaves and cuttings are living on energy stored in the stems and leaves until they grow roots so don't worry about watering them. You can mist or sprinkle them once a week or so but you really have to be careful at this point. Rot is easier than root. Also, they will shrivel before they root but be patient. Hopefully some of them will survive.

You can try laying some of them over on their side and gently pressing them into the soil so the stem is mostly covered. You have to take the leaves off the down side.

Keep us posted.

No, sorry, there's no way to convince them its now spring.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
New York City
SQGlue92
Jan 7, 2018 2:12 AM CST
For the ones that were planted about a week ago - am I better of leaving them alone or pulling them out, cutting them as you descriped, letting them sit for a few days to scab over, and then replanting?

I used a cactus potting mix that's very airy but definitely started with it too damp.

Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Jan 7, 2018 9:49 AM CST
Jades are non-seasonal so that is not a concern. As Daisy indicated, keeping the soil constantly wet or damp around the stems will cause them to rot. However, some moisture is required to trigger the production of roots. I suggest a very light watering or frequent misting of the soil to accomplish this. Warm temps and good sunlight will help the process.

I don't think it is necessary to allow the air drying initially, although that is usually recommended. My concern would be the very large pots you put them into. That increases the likelihood of inadvertent overwatering. In addition, after the roots are established, the cuttings will tend to continue to produce more roots at the expense of top growth. In my opinion, pots that are 1-2 inches in diameter would be more appropriate.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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