Houseplants forum: Help: Monstera plant

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London, UK
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Sabrinie
Jan 6, 2018 1:26 AM CST
Hi,

Forgive me as I have no experience with plants whatsoever!

My new monstera plant (from Ikea) has started getting light green patches on some of the leaves and these areas feel very thin and are starting to turn brown (Pics 1-3)

I am also worried about the black dots that are on some of the newer leaves, what are these? (Pics 4-5)

When I bought the plant, the bigger leaf was damaged with cuts in it and brown spots as shown in the pictures, should I be worried? (Pic 6)

Pic 7 shows the stem turning brown which wasn't like that before.

The plant is kept about 1metre from a huge window (I live in the UK so it is not very hot or bright here) and I have underfloor heating which is kept at 24 degrees / 75 Fahrenheit.
I only water when top inch of soil is dry and the plant is kept in its original pot with drainage holes.

Any help would be appreciated!

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[Last edited by Sabrinie - Jan 6, 2018 5:52 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1615033 (1)
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Jan 6, 2018 8:35 AM CST
Sabrinie - Congratulations on your new and healthy Monstera. I don't believe that any of the concerns that you referenced indicate that anything is wrong. Like most things in nature, plants are never perfect. They often have small blemishes and imperfections. I understand your desire to do everything possible to keep your new plant happy, but I can assure you that its overall health is fine. Step back a bit, worry less, and enjoy your plant. Hurray!
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
London, UK
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Sabrinie
Jan 6, 2018 9:55 AM CST
Thanks for the response, I'm feeling relieved that I'm not killing another plant!
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Jan 6, 2018 10:48 AM CST
You are on the right track. Just don't try to make it better by doing something radical like changing its soil or pot or location. Thumbs up
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Jan 6, 2018 11:15 AM CST
Sabrinie, Welcome!

Your Split-leaf Philodendron (Monstera deliciosa) looks very healthy and happy to me. If you recently acquired the plant, it's probably adjusting to it's new home conditions and will be fine. The crispy, brown leaf tip in your photo #2 is probably due to the lower humidity at this time of year. I can't tell what the black spots are that you refer to on newer leaves. The curling yellowish leaf in photo #4 is a new leaf unfurling; it will mature to the darker green shade as it ages. The leaf in photo #6 looks perfectly fine and normal to me. Juvenile Monstera leaves will have no slits or holes, looking more like a heart leaf philodendron but as the leaves mature, they will gain more holes and splits.

The light patches on the leaf in photo #1 may be normal. There are varieties of Monstera deliciosa that have light yellow to cream patches:


Juvenile leaves and a plant with different stages of leaf maturity:


Photos of plants with mature leaves:


~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


London, UK
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Sabrinie
Jan 6, 2018 12:15 PM CST
:thankyou:
I have definitely learned a lot about plants and by getting a monstera. Can't wait to see more leaves with splits!
London, UK
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Sabrinie
Jan 12, 2018 5:11 AM CST
Problem is getting worse, any ideas? Confused
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Name: Adam Pope
Seattle WA (Zone 8b)
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BotanicallyBaked
Jan 12, 2018 5:52 AM CST
i see a pot inside of another both of them have proper drainage??? no thats not healthy or normal at all
London, UK
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Sabrinie
Jan 12, 2018 8:46 AM CST
BotanicallyBaked said:i see a pot inside of another both of them have proper drainage??? no thats not healthy or normal at all


Yeah, the inner pot is the pot it came in which has some drainage holes but the other pot does not. Do you think this is bacteria or fungus?
[Last edited by Sabrinie - Jan 12, 2018 8:47 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1619072 (9)
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Jan 12, 2018 11:24 AM CST
Looks like there may be a watering problem. There is nothing wrong with double-potting. However, it is very important to lift up the inner pot after each watering to make sure water is not collecting in the bottom of the outer pot.

Allow the top half-inch of soil to dry before adding just enough water so that the top half inch of soil is dry again in about a week. Adjust the volume of water accordingly.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Sue Taylor
Northumberland, UK
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kniphofia
Jan 12, 2018 11:36 AM CST
Will you aren't suggesting to just water the top of the soil? I would give the plant a thorough watering then pour away any excess water that hasn't been absorbed after half an hour or so. A good watering is better than a dribble more frequently, the plant needs to have air flowing through the rootball which occurs when the water runs out of the bottom of the pot.

The black patches may be caused by excess heating, or draughts.

Most newly acquired plants take some settling in as they've come from greenhouses, have been transported and often have been in a store environment, so let your plant adapt to its surroundings and it should be fine.
London, UK
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Sabrinie
Jan 12, 2018 11:47 AM CST
Thanks for the responses!

I have only watered twice since I got the plant at the end of December.
The first time I think was too shallow but the second time I took the plant out of the decorative pot and watered thoroughly, allowing it to drain (2 hours) before putting it back in its original pot.

Just want to make sure this isn't some kind of fungus or bacteria as my apartment can get humid and warm with cooking.
Name: Sue Taylor
Northumberland, UK
Charter ATP Member Bookworm Amaryllis Houseplants Annuals Garden Photography
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Foliage Fan Bulbs Bee Lover Frogs and Toads Container Gardener
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kniphofia
Jan 12, 2018 11:49 AM CST
Do fill in your profile information as it helps us to help you.

Nice to see another Brit here!
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Jan 12, 2018 11:58 AM CST
Sabrinie - There is no reason to suspect a fungal or bacterial infection.

Sue - You are correct that in general, it is best to water thoroughly. However in situations where a thorough watering keeps the soil and roots moist for a couple of weeks or longer, then root suffocation can set it. When I recommend watering just enough so that it dries out again in a week, that is not dribbling. Just as roots need regular replenishment of water, they need regular infusions of oxygen and that can only occur if the soil dries out properly and every week or so.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
London, UK
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Sabrinie
Jan 12, 2018 1:59 PM CST
WillC said:Sabrinie - There is no reason to suspect a fungal or bacterial infection.

Sue - You are correct that in general, it is best to water thoroughly. However in situations where a thorough watering keeps the soil and roots moist for a couple of weeks or longer, then root suffocation can set it. When I recommend watering just enough so that it dries out again in a week, that is not dribbling. Just as roots need regular replenishment of water, they need regular infusions of oxygen and that can only occur if the soil dries out properly and every week or so.


Thanks for the reassurance Will. I will try that!

Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
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Carter
Jan 12, 2018 2:15 PM CST
Hi there. I agree with everyone that the original posting is that of a nice healthy plant and the newer pics are signs of overwatering issues. I completely agree with everything Will has stated.

Of all the plants I grow, Monstera deliciosa is one of my absolute favorites. I love the transformation the leaves make as the plant matures. These are generally tough, carefree plants with just a few basic needs. Primarily, when grown indoors, make sure to let dry slightly between watering. Bright natural light is also a bonus, but they will tolerate (but not thrive) in lower light.

I'm lucky enough that I can grow them outdoors year round, though a light freeze will zap the big beautiful leaves. This was one of mine several years ago growing up a big oak tree in the back yard. It's well over 6 ft, probably over 7 ft tall with leaves over 3 ft wide.

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London, UK
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Sabrinie
Jan 13, 2018 6:05 PM CST
WillC said:Sabrinie - There is no reason to suspect a fungal or bacterial infection.

Sue - You are correct that in general, it is best to water thoroughly. However in situations where a thorough watering keeps the soil and roots moist for a couple of weeks or longer, then root suffocation can set it. When I recommend watering just enough so that it dries out again in a week, that is not dribbling. Just as roots need regular replenishment of water, they need regular infusions of oxygen and that can only occur if the soil dries out properly and every week or so.


Thanks for the reassurance Will. I will try that!


Ludia_K
Jun 6, 2018 9:11 AM CST
Hello everyone!

I have acquired a Monstera plant that I have been wanting in a long time now. I was very happy I found one in my local Ikea and I brought it home. However, the leaves seem far from healthy and I really don't know what the deal is. I've read many forums, watched many videos and tried a lot of "troubleshooting", but I still don't know what's causing that to the plant. As you can see in the pictures, the leaves have black spots with yellow halos and in general they look very affected by whatever that is. I had to cut some of the older leaves that were very bad and for a week or so it looked happy. Now it started having these spots in many more leaves. However there are some new leaves perking up from the lower part.

I think watering is ok, I give it a good rinse (once per week approximately), wait for the excess water to go away and I've given it a couple of showers in these 2 months that I have it. I live in Sweden and my apartment's windows face the East, with plenty of sunshine and a good temperature of around 20-22 degrees in the house. I'm not sure about humidity levels, but I leave a small window open so the air is circulating. The only thing is that I haven't added any nutrients since I got it. From what I read, I suspect bacterial infection, but I really don't know what to do.

I'd be very grateful if I could get some help, I love this plant and I truly want to save it! Thank You!

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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Jun 6, 2018 2:33 PM CST
Ludia - The leaf spots are the result of some damage to the roots most likely caused by improper potting or watering. I cannot see the pot and you didn't provide any information about how it is potted or repotted and what kind of soil it is in and if the pot has drain holes. More information would be helpful.

The east window is fine as long as the Monstera is no more than 3 or 4 feet from the window and in front of it, not off to the side. It does not need any nutrients and it does not need misting or a shower.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

Ludia_K
Jun 14, 2018 1:49 AM CST
WillC said:Ludia - The leaf spots are the result of some damage to the roots most likely caused by improper potting or watering. I cannot see the pot and you didn't provide any information about how it is potted or repotted and what kind of soil it is in and if the pot has drain holes. More information would be helpful.

The east window is fine as long as the Monstera is no more than 3 or 4 feet from the window and in front of it, not off to the side. It does not need any nutrients and it does not need misting or a shower.


Thank you Will! I will take a good picture of the roots once at home and post it here. Do you think it might be burns from direct sunlight, or low humidity levels? I check how dry the soil is before I water it and as I mentioned I do it approx once a week. I can exclude root rot, the root smells OK and there are not signs of overwatering really. It's gotten worse that week, so I added a cup of a general nutrient in the last watering, in case it helps a bit. Also, the new leaves seem to be doing fine!

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