Ask a Question forum: Rosemary Black Dots

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Richmond, TX
paradeshi
Jan 8, 2018 11:23 AM CST
Hi there,


Thumb of 2018-01-08/paradeshi/04d5bf
Thumb of 2018-01-08/paradeshi/5af286

Thanks for any help on this! I've noticed these black dots on my rosemary leaves and stem. Does anybody know what this could be? I'm attaching two photos for your reference. Thanks!
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
Image
Philipwonel
Jan 8, 2018 1:34 PM CST
Best I can tell on my phone, is it looks like scale.
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Richmond, TX
paradeshi
Jan 8, 2018 1:38 PM CST
Thanks Philipwonel! That's interesting, is it something that could hurt if consumed you reckon?
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
Image
Philipwonel
Jan 8, 2018 3:24 PM CST
Let's call it...
Rosemary with protein.
No, it won't hurt you.
Most will wash off.

Anyhow. Anybody that eats veges, eats bugs. The USDA, even, allows a certain number of bugs per serving in all veges. 😮😮😮 , 😋😋😋!!!

😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Richmond, TX
paradeshi
Jan 8, 2018 3:25 PM CST
Lol, thanks Philipwonel!
Name: Sue
SF Bay Area, CA (Zone 9b)
Container Gardener Canning and food preservation Dog Lover
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Zuni
Jan 9, 2018 2:07 AM CST
It would be good @paradeshi if you could get rid of them before they get worse. They're hard to get rid of, and can kill the plant eventually. There are natural options. Although it might end up tasting like soap...lol. Just rinse well.
Richmond, TX
paradeshi
Jan 9, 2018 6:29 AM CST
Thank you @Zuni! Would you be kind enough to share with me what these natural options are? Appreciate the support.
Name: Sue
SF Bay Area, CA (Zone 9b)
Container Gardener Canning and food preservation Dog Lover
Image
Zuni
Jan 9, 2018 8:07 PM CST
@paradeshi This is a good resource website without a ton of advertising all over it:

https://www.planetnatural.com/...

It includes a bunch of natural options like neem oil, insecticidal soap, etc., as well as releasing predator insects like lacewings.

There's actually a really interesting woman with a youtube channel I found, who has 500 houseplants in her New York apartment, and I saw that she has a video about releasing lacewings in her apartment. I haven't watched that particular one yet, but this is her channel:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

I have watched her videos on her watering techniques and I'm going to try some. At any rate, she's quite knowledgeable on houseplants.

If it was me, I'd start by removing them by hand. If you don't have a huge amounts of plants, this is the easiest. I was able to manage a small outbreak of aphids on my bougainvillea on my balcony last summer by just checking the leaves every day and squashing all of the bugs and eggs I found. I didn't end up needing anything beyond that.

I do like to use just watered down dish soap as the next line of defense normally.

Healthy plants will have a natural resistance to bugs and diseases, so if you keep them healthy and water them appropriately, they will also be less susceptible. Then, you usually just need to quickly kill any rogue invaders and that's often enough.
Richmond, TX
paradeshi
Jan 9, 2018 8:15 PM CST
@Zuni, very insightful. Thank you! I'm curious to know though if scale is a disease that can die with neem oil or if it's something that's 'formed' on the leaves that doesn't hurt. Does that make sense?
Name: Sue
SF Bay Area, CA (Zone 9b)
Container Gardener Canning and food preservation Dog Lover
Image
Zuni
Jan 9, 2018 8:26 PM CST
paradeshi said:@Zuni, very insightful. Thank you! I'm curious to know though if scale is a disease that can die with neem oil or if it's something that's 'formed' on the leaves that doesn't hurt. Does that make sense?


@paradeshi That makes complete sense. They are actually insects, though. Isn't that amazing? The ones that you have appear to be the hard shell type. They are an insect that has evolved to not look like an insect - I would guess, so that birds don't notice them and pick them off - and to form a hard shell, so they are also protected by a bit of armor. Pretty amazing, eh?

This is why they're hard to get rid of. They're like little armadillos with camouflauge.

So, they're not actually something that has formed on the leaves. They are camouflaged flat insects that hold on to the plant and suck the juices out of it.

So, when they reproduce, the next thing you know, your plant is getting more and more of it's life juice sucked out of it. Then, it starts to get sick, and gets susceptible to other diseases and would eventually die from losing it's "blood" so to speak, and/or from another disease it succumbed to.

So, getting rid of them now is preventive medicine. You wouldn't likely get sick from eating them yourself, but if you just leave them to reproduce, they will likely end up killing your plant - and any others you have or bring in.
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
Image
Philipwonel
Jan 10, 2018 7:24 AM CST
1 Tbl old fashion dawn dishsoap to 1 gallon water. Spray plants, early morning or evening, no need to wash off.
If plant is small, you could just submerge her in a bucket of water for 20 minutes, weight her down with something, to keep her submerged.
DROWN THE SUCCKERS !
Ewe 😀 I made a pun.
Whistling 🙊 Rolling on the floor laughing
Philip 😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
[Last edited by Calif_Sue - Jan 10, 2018 11:43 AM (+)]
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Richmond, TX
paradeshi
Jan 10, 2018 8:27 PM CST
You guys are hilarious! Thank you so much!!!

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