Ask a Question forum: Possible to save this Jalapeño plant

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Vancouver
Juliochristo
Jan 13, 2018 3:46 PM CST
I have a Jalapeño plant that I'm trying to restore. What do I do?

All the leaves veins are brown and I've trimmed back the lower damaged foliage.

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Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Mid-Atlantic Composter Region: Maryland Birds
Cat Lover Dog Lover Region: United States of America
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sallyg
Jan 13, 2018 5:54 PM CST
Being normally a full sun, heat loving plant, it's got a real challenge being indoors. Having mature fruit on is also an energy demand to the plant. Do you know what it's recovering from?
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Vancouver
Juliochristo
Jan 13, 2018 5:58 PM CST
Well, I've had a couple of Jalapeños indoor before and they were fine - not sure of the strain however. I don't really know what they were recovering from this is just the states that I received them in.

I've harvested the Jalapeño as a start but I'm wondering if anyone on the forum can diagnose that kind of leaf problem. I've seen photos showing issues of other varieties but I have not seen any images that resemble mine.
Southern Ontario, Canada
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Raddyl
Jan 15, 2018 9:04 PM CST
1. Was it indoor vs outdoor plant? (possible fungus such as Septoria?)
2. Do you know if old leaves discolored first? (bacterial?)
3. It may kill it, especially if the problem is in the roots or soil, but in the past when I receive, specifically peppers, in a nasty state like that and I am out of ideas, I chop them a few inches from the soil and cross my fingers. Peppers are some of the most resilient plants I know of aside mint, I usually see new growth and leaves within a week. Otherwise it's a slowwwww recovery. You could even chop one stem off and try a propagation attempt.

Sorry, but that's all I can think of without some history.
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jan 15, 2018 10:05 PM CST
Hi Julio, from another (transplanted) Vancouverite. I know the weather there is grey, what little sun you get is very weak and the days are short at this time of year.

Pepper plants love sun, and heat so the best you can possibly do for that plant would be to get a grow light for it, and maybe a little grow mat (gentle heat pad meant for raising seedlings) as well to keep it warmer and give it the light it needs. The grow light will need to be on, and close to the plant (within inches) for at least 12 hours per day. Start with a shorter time, and build up to all day light gradually, as you start to see new growth.

The plant has basically starved to death, for lack of sunlight. I think possibly the brown veins in the leaves could be from over watering. Both those situations will be solved with more warmth and light.

Do NOT under any circumstances give it any fertilizer until new growth starts (healthy, green new leaves) then begin with a soluble fertilizer at about 1/4 the strength they say on the package. Any stronger solution will burn the new leaves, doing more harm than good. A plant can't utilize nutrients if it's not growing, so be patient and wait for new leaves.

Good luck!
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Vancouver
Juliochristo
Jan 16, 2018 12:01 AM CST
Thanks raddyl and dyzzypyxxy for the advice. This plant used to be outside during the summer in a large box. I think the soil was off so I transplanted with some quality soil. Unfortunately I did fertilize but with some good organic fish based stuff. There aren't many leaves on it left ... perhaps 4 so I think it's probably best to cut it right down and wait for some life to emerge. I have a grow light I could try...should I wait for new growth to emerge before starting that?
Vancouver
Juliochristo
Jan 16, 2018 12:03 AM CST
If it has caught a cold...fungus or something else...how would you proceed? Is it treatable?
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Mid-Atlantic Composter Region: Maryland Birds
Cat Lover Dog Lover Region: United States of America
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sallyg
Jan 16, 2018 9:01 AM CST
Last year at end of summer, I trimmed and potted one of my pepper plants, It died on the windowsill. By the time your jalapeno recovers, IF it recovers, your store will be selling vigorous new baby plants. I don't think this is worth the effort- just being honest. (Though you may like the learning experience.)
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jan 16, 2018 2:08 PM CST
I do kind of agree with Sally. It may not recover at all. But if you still want to try, there's no reason to cut anything. The stem is still green so it's alive. Just give it light, warmth and when it starts leafing out, a tiny bit of fertilizer.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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stone
Jan 16, 2018 4:52 PM CST
In my experience, a plant carried over from last year starts blooming and setting fruit right away, while a seedling has a lot of maturing to do... unfortunately, they don't always survive the winter.

I would encourage you to allow the roots to dry out between waterings, and to stop cutting it back.

In my experience, cutting the dead bits off in an attempt to tidy the plant tends to finish the plant off.

If you could provide it with grow lights, you might begin to see some life... I can't tell about the leaf... pepper plants tend to look ragged at the end of summer (in the best of times), and potting them up tends to make them look worse.

My plants usually start to perk up with the additional sun shining through the window as the days get longer... and I start seeing blooms even before the end of frost... You would probably have fruit by time to set the plant out... if you are lucky enough to keep it alive.

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