All Things Gardening forum: Gifted 3 bags of chicken manure in the middle of summer - how should I use them?

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Melbourne, Australia [AU zone
whoatemylettuce
Jan 14, 2018 9:27 PM CST
Firstly, thank you for your time reading this. I'm from Melbourne/Australia.

I have just done gardening for the past 6 months, starting with 0 experience.

At the moment, we have 3 vegetable beds -growing mainly Shungiku, Kang Kong (water spinach), Spinach, Pumpkin, Lettuce, Spring Onion, Sweet Potatoes
- the beds are made using lasagna method which already have horse manure back in July (winter). All plants are pretty much established and yielding crops with liquid fertilizer applied every 2 weeks

1 lemon tree which has been fertilized with citrus food last month

4 tomatoes plant fertilized with liquid fertilizer every 2 weeks

And bunch of roses which I don't really want to keep because I can't see their benefits beside decorative purpose or extract for scented candle and wife's bath.

So with this 3 bags of chicken manure (not pellet) - what should I do with them.

Should I keep them in store and wait till winter (another 6 months or so) before digging them in beds for new seasons?
Or should I apply by raking them into soil of the beds for veggie and tomatoes etc?
Or should I just throw them in compost? Because this is already aged manure, will mixing them in compost not utilizing their full usage?

My understanding is it's better to use manure ASAP otherwise nutrients are leached? not sure if this is still the case because they're in bags....

Thank you and hope to hear from your opinions soon.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 14, 2018 10:26 PM CST
Put the chicken manure in the compost pile and revisit it in about a year. Smiling
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Jan 15, 2018 8:36 AM CST
The thing to understand about chicken poop, is the high N ratio.
I've used it fresh, but very sparingly.
Treat it the same as you would chemical fertilizers, and you'll be in the right ballpark.

I agree that there is a leaching issue with holding on to animal products, and even worse, there's the fire fanged issue, where all the valuable bits get oxidized and released into the atmosphere.

That smell? Thats the nitrogen escaping.

Mixing some of it into a high carbon compost mix is also a viable alternative.
Melbourne, Australia [AU zone
whoatemylettuce
Jan 15, 2018 4:35 PM CST
Thank you guys,

It's not fresh I guess. It's a bagged commercial product so I reckon must have been aged.
But anyway, I'll mix them into compost then.
[Last edited by whoatemylettuce - Jan 15, 2018 4:35 PM (+)]
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Name: Frank Mosher
Nova Scotia, Canada (Zone 6a)
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fwmosher
Jan 17, 2018 1:01 PM CST
If it is aged, you can use it right away, but I would apply it at the start of growing season (your Spring). If it is commercially bagged, it is "cured" so no worry about Salmonella introduction as with any "fresh" manure. As others have suggested, if it is not the start of your growing season, add it to your compost heap. Cheers! PS. You are going to break my heart by turfing the roses. LOL
Melbourne, Australia [AU zone
whoatemylettuce
Jan 18, 2018 5:02 AM CST
fwmosher said:If it is aged, you can use it right away, but I would apply it at the start of growing season (your Spring). If it is commercially bagged, it is "cured" so no worry about Salmonella introduction as with any "fresh" manure. As others have suggested, if it is not the start of your growing season, add it to your compost heap. Cheers! PS. You are going to break my heart by turfing the roses. LOL


Thank you for your kind advice. No I won't turfing the roses anymore, I'll dig them out and give them away.
I do feel bad for removing plants and it does hurt, like when you kill someone, when I cut down a plant with no other choice.

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