All Things Gardening forum: Fresh Cow Manure Need Help!

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TEWNCfarms
Jan 17, 2018 8:09 PM CST
So I have been getting this sterile dewormer vermicide horse manure for the past almost 6 months, building up all this compost by mixing fresh veggies from a restaurant, but it still ends up being sterile even though it looks and smells amazing. Fire ants always end up coming back to it, and No worms or anything else Ever go into it.

Well two weeks ago I reconnected with a Great supply of cow manure, pretty much organic, already found multiple worms.

But I Need to use this on my fields This spring, because I don't want to add the sterile compost/manure and it cause more problems than using chemicals! I have mixed the fresh manure--which the pile im grabbing from is the oldest, but it has Never been turned or anything so it is still ammonia rich manure--but mixed this with the wood shavings they have piled up, and the pile I first made has Never gotten hot.

The manure is very wet, and maybe that is the problem, or maybe something else, maybe too much nitrogen. It does reek, it just some times smell like kind of fresh manure.

What should I do to be able to use this in the next couple months?!?

I was thinking of just adding it to the soil and let it sit for a couple weeks and just till it in, but I also don't want to burn the plants. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Jan 18, 2018 11:22 AM CST
Where are you at?
How big of a garden?
I have used sheep manure that still smelled like sh-t and both left it sit for months or just put it on and roto-tilled it in with no problems.
[Last edited by RpR - Jan 18, 2018 11:24 AM (+)]
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TEWNCfarms
Jan 18, 2018 12:08 PM CST
RpR said:Where are you at?
How big of a garden?
I have used sheep manure that still smelled like sh-t and both left it sit for months or just put it on and roto-tilled it in with no problems.

Southeastern NC. Yeah I mean it doesn't reek, it does have a smell with some of it, but I can Not get it to heat up... I'll be planting in the middle/end of March. I'll probably spread it out around the beginning of March.
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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stone
Jan 18, 2018 2:53 PM CST
How it sounds to me... Is that as your manure has been holding a great deal of moisture, and the smell might be anaerobic bacteria.
Those bacteria kinda have a bad name among compost people, but I can't think how they would cause any problems... I do suggest putting the manure out now, rather than waiting.

Also... don't worry about too much nitrogen... that isn't why it won't heat up... the moisture is the reason...
At my house.... I'm not concerned with getting the compost to heat up, I'm concerned about getting it to help with water retention... sounds like you have that covered!

TEWNCfarms
Jan 18, 2018 9:42 PM CST
stone said:How it sounds to me... Is that as your manure has been holding a great deal of moisture, and the smell might be anaerobic bacteria.
Those bacteria kinda have a bad name among compost people, but I can't think how they would cause any problems... I do suggest putting the manure out now, rather than waiting.

Also... don't worry about too much nitrogen... that isn't why it won't heat up... the moisture is the reason...
At my house.... I'm not concerned with getting the compost to heat up, I'm concerned about getting it to help with water retention... sounds like you have that covered!

Awesome! Okay I'm really glad to hear this! I would add it to the field now but I have a green cover crop on it right now, I was going to let that grow some, I still need to pick up a few more loads anyways to cover the area.

I'm getting a full 1500 truck bed full at a time which I believe is like 2.5cyds and I have my tomato plot which is 2,400sqft so I need At Least 3 loads to cover at 1", maybe I'll try and make it 2" so I'll need 6 loads. My land is Very barren with high sand, high phosphorus, Very low potassium, and a pH of like 5.5. I've already added the suggested lime, and nitrogen and potassium fertilizer (I had to use chemicals for that since using blood and kelp meal would have put me in some debt trying to cover that area). I'm thinking of getting one more soil test done After I add the manure to see if my numbers are where they need to be. I get hit with Bad disease and bugs, so I'm trying to get the plants nutrients where it needs to be to help combat the problems.

Anyone use Korean Natural Farming techniques or Biodynamics?
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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stone
Jan 19, 2018 9:32 AM CST
Thumb of 2018-01-19/stone/aab304

Here's how much I'm bringing in...
After the piles (each hump is a truckload), have time to loosen the sand, and kill the vines and stuff, I shift the manure enough to turn the sand, and... Then put some back... Probably bring in a lot more than you're talking about.

Don't know about the Korean methodology, how about a link or something?

TEWNCfarms
Jan 19, 2018 8:50 PM CST
stone said:Thumb of 2018-01-19/stone/aab304

Here's how much I'm bringing in...
After the piles (each hump is a truckload), have time to loosen the sand, and kill the vines and stuff, I shift the manure enough to turn the sand, and... Then put some back... Probably bring in a lot more than you're talking about.

Don't know about the Korean methodology, how about a link or something?


I hear that, yeah I probably have less than you. Are you loading by hand or do you have a bucket loader to help? I've got to do this stuff by hand and the pure manure is Heavy!

Here is a picture of the manure I have, I was trying to mix like half and half with the wood shavings they have but it still didn't heat up, and I feel like that is asking to have my nutrients eaten up by the wood shavings so I'm thinking of just going pure manure. What do you all think?

Thumb of 2018-01-20/TEWNCfarms/8444a6
Thumb of 2018-01-20/TEWNCfarms/d1503e

And here is a link to KNF it's basically using all local inputs and fermenting your own nutrients and pesticides etc, the big thing is indigenous microorganisms where you basically cultivate the white mycelium on the forest floor and move it to your field, if done Right the whole field will turn into a beautiful white mycelium forest floor.

I coukdnt our the link in, but just type in Korean Natural Farming in google it will pop up. Heard of biodynamics?
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Jan 20, 2018 8:27 PM CST
TEWNCfarms said:
Here is a picture of the manure I have, I was trying to mix like half and half with the wood shavings they have but it still didn't heat up, and I feel like that is asking to have my nutrients eaten up by the wood shavings so I'm thinking of just going pure manure. What do you all think?

You are really just feeding the wood chips which will do your garden no good.
Go straight manure.

Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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stone
Jan 22, 2018 7:30 AM CST
When working with sand, bulk is very important.
Mixing with woodchips isn't going to harm the manure, but... Will prevent heating up... And prolong the composting process.
Seems like unnessary effort to mix with anything.
I'd save the woodchips for mulch.

And, yes, I load & unload by hand.
Helps to have the right tools. I use a silage fork... Don't know if it would work with the product that you are getting.

Ok....
Searched natural Korean gardening.... Doesn't sound too different from my style...

I'll do you one better....
How about an article in praise of weeds?
http://journeytoforever.org/fa...

Here's a cardinal that appreciates my gardening technique:

Thumb of 2018-01-22/stone/035f18
[Last edited by stone - Jan 22, 2018 7:46 AM (+)]
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Name: Frank Mosher
Nova Scotia, Canada (Zone 6a)
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fwmosher
Jan 23, 2018 9:41 AM CST
Tewncfarms, firstly, welcome to Garden.org. As you still haven't said where you are, it is difficult to make recommendations. Having said that, farmers here take their raw manure and spread it out over their fields in fall or early Spring, to cure it. Then they till it in. I would not add woodchips to ANYTHING, (except for a worm farm) as it is a bad compost bulk "filler". It saps most of your nitrogen to decompose the wood shavings. Additionally, it draws unduly large numbers of nesting "what we called cutworms when we were young", perhaps always called centipedes now. About an inch long, very thin with a brownish hard shell. They crawl very slowly. Cheers. Smiling

TEWNCfarms
Feb 10, 2018 7:03 PM CST
Bought a manure fork and fill the truck bed up in 30 minutes now! Getting lots of piles and going to put them out in the field in March... I started my 600+ tomato seeds beginning February in my fresh made hot bed but I think the top soil was too wet and I didn't have the seams sealed and it rained in it... so I think they all died... but that might have been THE LORD'S work, I kind of hope they did die because I'm gonna buy some even crazy seeds from wild boar farms and it gives me more time to prepare the field especially since the manure is fresh/anaerobic.

I'm in southeastern North Carolina, Wilmington area, zone 8a.

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