Plant ID forum: Please help me identify my grandma's orange type. Maybe tangerine?

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Southern California
Infinitecrisis
Jan 18, 2018 2:38 AM CST
These are from a tree in my grandma's backyard. She says they're tangerines, but I can't find any breed online that has that little bulb on the top. They're also ultra ultra sour, which is why I love them so much. I plan on just planting the seeds and trying to grow my own so I guess it doesn't really matter unless its the type of tree with infertile seeds so the seed seller can sell more. In which case I do need an ID. How would I check for that anyway? Also how many seeds should I put in a pot to start the growing?

I created an imgur album with more pictures but I can't post it because I'm new. Here is the album id though if you want to enter it manually,

/a/KGmWR

Thumb of 2018-01-18/Infinitecrisis/0ba606

Southern California
Infinitecrisis
Jan 18, 2018 2:47 AM CST
Maybe it's a tangelo? Google says those are sweet though.
Name: Tofi
Sumatera, Indonesia
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tofitropic
Jan 18, 2018 3:34 AM CST
Not trying to ID your citrus, cause I have no idea, but cant help to comment that those bump on top reminds me of one of most famous citrus of Japan the Dekopon (which literally means bumpy ponkan {another famous citrus, one of its parents). Dekopon is sweet and seedless, so off course not yours. Smiling I hope other will help with the ID
However my suggestion is; why not try grafting or layering? and you'll have exact clone of your beloved grandma's citrus.
Southern California
Infinitecrisis
Jan 18, 2018 3:39 AM CST
tofitropic said:However my suggestion is; why not try grafting or layering? and you'll have exact clone of your beloved grandma's citrus.


I've never really grown anything before so I'm not familiar with grafting or layering, but that sounds like a great idea, I'll look into it. Thank you.
Southern California
Infinitecrisis
Jan 18, 2018 3:44 AM CST
I just looked up a guide on air-layering. That sounds perfect! It says the best time to do it is when the tree starts growing new leaves. Do you know what time of year that is for a citrus tree?
Name: Tofi
Sumatera, Indonesia
Vegetable Grower Butterflies Garden Procrastinator Roses Bookworm Tomato Heads
Tropicals Salvias Plays in the sandbox Frogs and Toads Fruit Growers Sempervivums
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tofitropic
Jan 18, 2018 4:05 AM CST
Well I live in tropic where everytime is summer, LOL
I'm not really sure for your area, but my guess will be mid or late spring to give time for root to mature enough till you separated them...
Go for it.. it's not too difficult, no need to be nuclear scientist to do it, just learn, even if you fail at first. and you'll have fruits within few years instead of from seed..

Please contact local gardener too, or any forum in this site ( propagation https://garden.org/forums/view... ) I hope other will chime in too. Group hug
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
My dogs love me; some people don't.
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greene
Jan 18, 2018 5:47 AM CST
Please look at Mineola Tangelo, a cross between Duncan grapefruit and Dancy mandarin in this link:

http://www.clovegarden.com/ing...
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Southern California
Infinitecrisis
Jan 18, 2018 6:26 AM CST
greene said:Please look at Mineola Tangelo, a cross between Duncan grapefruit and Dancy mandarin in this link:



Wow. It looks identical. Is there any way to know if that's the one for certain?
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
My dogs love me; some people don't.
Deer Bookworm Keeper of Poultry Vermiculture Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Georgia
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greene
Jan 18, 2018 7:06 AM CST
To know for certain, Shrug! I suppose if you spent enough money someone could do some kind of DNA or genetic testing?

Here is another link with a description.
http://www.wonderfulcitrus.com...

We have an NGA member who lives not too far from me and knows quite a bit about citrus; let me give a shout out to @TheCitrusGuy to see if he can help.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: bron
NSW-Qld border Australia
DD + her little ones
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bron
Jan 18, 2018 7:42 AM CST
wondering if the tree is on a grafted rootstock? If not maybe it is a self sown sdlg. I read somewhere that tangelos grow true to type from seed. But in my experience when you grow a few different types of citrus near each other they cross pollinate. I have a tangelo and a tangerine. Also a 20 yr old tree with yellow easily peeled fruit with a mild refreshing taste. It has a topnot. It looks like a wekiwa but probably isn't. The tree has long spikes.

So if you raise sdlgs they might be a little different from the fruit. But worth a try. Most citrus are grafted onto rootstock which increase the cropping and the longevity of a tree. Also rootstock are selected to better cope with various soil/local climate conditions.
My son has a sdlg tree which produces nice mandarins. It also has long thorns. It is vigorous in his volcanic soil so I was always pruning it to allow air movement inside the tree.

I once accidenatlly allowed a trifoliata rootstock on an valencia orange to grow and fruit. The fruit looked nice but it tasted evil.
[Last edited by bron - Jan 18, 2018 9:43 PM (+)]
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Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
My dogs love me; some people don't.
Deer Bookworm Keeper of Poultry Vermiculture Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Georgia
Plant Identifier Rabbit Keeper Composter Garden Sages Native Plants and Wildflowers Herbs
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greene
Jan 18, 2018 9:50 AM CST
Most purchased citrus trees are ( I believe) on grafted rootstock, usually but not always on trifoliate rootstock.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: bron
NSW-Qld border Australia
DD + her little ones
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bron
Jan 18, 2018 10:47 PM CST
Don't know if u can access this site where u r. Very informative about how citrus varieties are bred or naturally selected
http://citruspages.free.fr/cit...

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