Bulbs forum: Hyacinth bulbs

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Name: Carly Rush
San Diego California (Zone 10a)
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carlysuko
Jan 18, 2018 11:31 AM CST
Hi

I bought some hyacinth bulbs from Bluestone Perennials back in November. I placed them in the fridge drawer ( no fruit in there) and left them in there a little less than 2 months. I then potted them up and now I see they are starting to peek above the soil line. I was just wondering if anyone has ever done this with bulbs in warmer zones and if my chances are good that they will bloom?

Also I had gotten some Fritillaria michaelovskyi bulbs but unfortunately when I got them they were not good. A couple of them were broken in half and some we're shriveled and did not look at all viable. Bluestone was very good about it though as they refunded me no problem. There were a few that looked ok, so I put those in the fridge as well. Sadly when I took them out of the fridge, they looked much worse. I thought they needed a chill period based on what I had read. I'm pretty positive they won't do a thing this year but I was wondering if they could possibly do something next year, or are they goners for good?

Thanks for any feedback
Sweden
Bulbs Lilies Bee Lover Irises Hellebores Deer
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Photo Contest Winner: 2016
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William
Jan 18, 2018 5:32 PM CST
Hi Carly.

I would think that growing hyacinths outdoors in your zone would be very similar to forcing them indoors. I think you have as good chance of success as one have when forcing them. If the vernalization process is done correctly, they should bloom. Smiling Many spring bulbs are also sold pre-chilled specifically to be able to bloom in warmer areas.

Can't speak of F. michailovsky specifically, but my best guess is that they in similarity to other Fritillaria are best planted early in the autumn. Not doing this could jeopardize the natural rooting process and possibly even bloom formation. In my garden F. imperialis certainly is one of the first spring bulbs to root in autumn, often doing so sometime in August, provided there is enough moisture.

Even though most Fritillaria hate being wet, they are also very sensitive to drying out as they lack an outer tunic. They should normally never be out of soil very long. This is especially true for the smaller species. To me it sounds like you got some very abused bulbs, sadly this is probably very common.

Not sure how you have handled them since, but if you chilled them without planting them in a pot, then they have had no chance to root and all they could do were to dry out even more. If they still seem somewhat firm it might be worth a try to pot them up and place them in the fridge again to see if roots start to grow.
Name: Carly Rush
San Diego California (Zone 10a)
Image
carlysuko
Jan 20, 2018 10:43 AM CST
William said:Hi Carly.

I would think that growing hyacinths outdoors in your zone would be very similar to forcing them indoors. I think you have as good chance of success as one have when forcing them. If the vernalization process is done correctly, they should bloom. Smiling Many spring bulbs are also sold pre-chilled specifically to be able to bloom in warmer areas.

Can't speak of F. michailovsky specifically, but my best guess is that they in similarity to other Fritillaria are best planted early in the autumn. Not doing this could jeopardize the natural rooting process and possibly even bloom formation. In my garden F. imperialis certainly is one of the first spring bulbs to root in autumn, often doing so sometime in August, provided there is enough moisture.

Even though most Fritillaria hate being wet, they are also very sensitive to drying out as they lack an outer tunic. They should normally never be out of soil very long. This is especially true for the smaller species. To me it sounds like you got some very abused bulbs, sadly this is probably very common.

Not sure how you have handled them since, but if you chilled them without planting them in a pot, then they have had no chance to root and all they could do were to dry out even more. If they still seem somewhat firm it might be worth a try to pot them up and place them in the fridge again to see if roots start to grow.


Hi William,

Yes that makes a lot of sense about the Fritillaria since they pretty much arrived shriveled up. I love the way all the Fritillaria look so too bad. Good to know about the hycianth, they're coming up now. I've also got leucojum aestivum, double blue freesias, some Alba freesias, daffodils, and some dutch iris, so at least I can still look forward to all of them blooming.
Thank you again! Smiling

Sweden
Bulbs Lilies Bee Lover Irises Hellebores Deer
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Photo Contest Winner: 2016
Image
William
Jan 20, 2018 11:08 AM CST
You're very welcome Carly and thank you for the acorn. Smiling

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